Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Taming of the Shrew: Act 5 Scene 2

No description
by

Lillian Chen

on 30 November 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Taming of the Shrew: Act 5 Scene 2

At the wedding feast
Petruchio and Hortensio think they each fear their wife
Bet on their wives
Everyone knows that Katherina is now tamed
Katherina tells the Widow and Bianca about a wife's duties to her husband
The Widow and Bianca are seen as shrews
Summary
Dramatic Significance
There are three small moments of dramatic significance throughout the scene, which take place as a result of the wager made to see who had the most devoted wife.

Thematic Significance
Major Theme:
Do not let your confidence blind you.
By: Enoch, Lillian, Daniel, and Jessie
Taming of the Shrew: Act 5 Scene 2


Epistrophe
Lucentio-Petruchio (5.2.11-12)
- (Lucentio) “For now we sit to chat as well as eat.”
(Petruchio) “Nothing but sit and sit, and eat and eat”
To show the fact that Petruchio firmly and definitely agrees with Lucentio. Petruchio wants to get eating and relaxing stuck in their minds by repeating the words sit and eat. This repetition also creates a recency effect on the other characters.
Metaphor
Bianca-Petruchio (5.2.46-51) - (Bianca) “Am I your bird? I mean to shift my bush, and then pursue me as you draw your bow. You are welcome all” (Petruchio) “She hath prevented me. Here, Signor Tranio, This bird you aim’d at, though you hit her not-Therefore a health to all that shot and miss’d.”
Bianca and Petruchio both compare her to a targeted bird. This metaphor is very effective because it compares the suitors as people shooting at the bird (Bianca).
This shooting is representative of the intense pursuit of Bianca
Part D: Literary Devices and Their Effect
Similes
Katherina (5.2.139) & (5.2.140) respectively - “It blots thy beauty as frosts do bite the meads,”
This simile means that the angry facial expression that the widow has on her stains her beauty as the frosts dulls the meadows. It is the comparison of the widow’s facial expression and the fading meadow.
- “Confounds thy fame as whirlwinds shake fair buds,”
This simile means that the facial expression on the widow ruins her reputation as the strong winds shake the beautiful buds of flowers. Her bitter character represents the strong wind and the beautiful buds of flowers is compared to the widow’s reputation.
In general, these two similes are warnings from Kate that the widow should change her heated facial aspects (e.g., from and unkind brow to a kind one) or continue to lose her reputation and her beauty.
Part D Continued...
Part D Continued...
Allusion
Katherina (5.2.147) - “Thy head, thy sovereign; one that cares for thee”
This allusion is from the Bible (See Ephesians, 5:24). It is used to emphasize that the husband should be be supreme over the wife just like God is supreme over the church and the world. Therefore, in the context she is essentially telling the widow to accept Hortensio as her “ruler” and to submit to Hortensio’s will.
Pun
Tranio (5.2.56) - “Tis thought your deer does hold you at a bay.”
Tranio puns on ‘deer’ and dear’; the stag is said to be ‘at bay’ when it turns at tries to hold of the hounds. Tranio “disses” Petruchio with the pun because his dear (Katherina) seems like she is cornering and taking a stand against Petruchio just like the stag against the hounds.
Repetition
Biondello-Petruchio (5.2.81-82) - (Biondello) “Sir, my mistress sends you word that she is busy, and she cannot come.” (Petruchio) “How? ‘She’s busy and she cannot come’!”
This repetition is used almost like to mock Lucentio. It emphasizes the fact that Bianca rejected Lucentio order for her to come to him.
Katherina
Before:
the most sweet, obedient wife you could ever have
the dream wife of any man
After:
contrasting Petruchio and Katherina’s relationship, as Petruchio committed himself to taming Kate, Lucentio’s relationship was built on romance and submitting to Bianca for her love
shows she is not perfect as they previously thought
Evidence:
V.ii.39-41 - surprises the other characters as well as the reader by her indecent and rude wordplay
V.ii.80-83 - the characters expected Bianca to win the wager, but she didn’t even show up, showing her lack of trust or bond with Lucentio
V.ii.125-129 - contrasting Kate/Petruchio’s relationship, when Bianca came she came in making ill-mannered comments, without much of a bond
also shows that she believes Katherina’s complete obedience to be foolish
Part C: Character Development
Katherina
Biondello
Played by Jessie
Played by Daniel
Petruchio
Lucentio
Hortensio
Played by Enoch
Bianca
Widow
Played by Lily
Thank you for watching!
Played by Audience Members
Vincentio
Baptista

Justification
x
Modernized/Traditional play
props (table)
took out the kiss
took out Tranio and Gremio and gave Biondello their lines
Costumes represent levels in society and character traits

Katherina: long skirt and flower top
Biondello: dress shirt
Petruchio: formal clothing
Hortensio: formal clothing, moustache
Lucentio: formal clothing and a hat
Widow: black skirt
Bianca: pink skirt and flower in her hair

-Lucentio and Hortensio were quick to agree on the wager Petruchio proposed
-They were too fixed on the idea that Katherina was and would always be a nasty, ill-tempered shrew
Social Roles:
-theme of different social roles people played in society
-wager between the three men
-Katherina's words from lines 136-179

-Rising action: On the three different occasions in which Biondello and Grumio go to call either Bianca, the Widow, or Katherina to come
-Climax: Katherina obeys her husband It is almost ironic, because through even the title, Katherina was called a shrew, yet she showed stayed loyal to her husband and the Widow and Bianca did not.

Taming

-The three men place a bid to see who has the most loyal wife
-Katherina shows recurring behaviour that she has been tamed
In Act 5, Scene 2, Lines 136-179, each line that Katherina delivers contributes to a rising action that leads to the climax.
-With each line, the characters and the audience see how Katherina's heart and thinking has changed.
-Climax is in line 180, where Petruchio and Kate kiss
-It also shows their true love
Lines 150-154: "
To watch the night in stores, the day in cold,
Whilst thou li'st warm at home, secure and safe,
And craves no other tribute at thy hands
But love, fair looks, and true obedience"

Lines 121-122: "
Katherine, that cap of yours becomes you not:
Off with that bauble--throw it underfoot!"
Line 179:
"My hand is ready, may it do him ease"
Before:
despised by other characters
just beginning to warm up to Petruchio
After:
tremendous loyalty to Petruchio
accepted new found role in society
now has a level of respect and authorty
Evidence:
V.ii.96-100 - she wins the wager, and shows her intimate trust and obedience of Petruchio
V.ii.116-120 - Petruchio states his trust in her virtue and obedience. Brings in other wives through her"womanly persuasion” showing the new authority and respect she has
V.ii.121-124 - throws her hat on the floor when asked, showing loyalty, trust, and obedience as well as the reaction of the other characters as shocked
V.ii.136-179- her speech which rattles the other characters, and shows her loyalty and views on being a wife
Petruchio
Before:
other characters question his way of “taming the shrew”
seen as completely boastful, arrogant,
After:
shows that although he is the lord of his wife, he also has complete trust in her
shows how he truly loves Katherina, and was not there only for the dowry
Evidence
V.ii.48-51 - this portrays his beliefs that although Traino did not get Bianca, should still be happy
V.ii.65-73 - he is willing to wager much more than anyone else on his wife showing trust
V.ii.180 - the third kiss is representative of their new found bond
V.ii.184-187 - this further enforces his beliefs that, although some did not hit their target (Bianca), they would not ever be as happy as he is with Katherina

Bianca
Full transcript