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The Taxi by: Amy Lowell

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by

Dylan Henschell

on 4 January 2013

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Transcript of The Taxi by: Amy Lowell

"The Taxi" Poem by: Amy Lowell Prezi by: Chloe, Tegan, & Dylan Author Background Amy Lowell was born on February 9th, 1874 in Massachusetts and was the youngest of five children. Her first piece of writing was written with her mother and sister when she was only 13 years old. By 1910 she was writing and getting her own poems published. She focused a lot of time on the Imagist Movement and served as a publicity agent for the movement. She died in 1925 but still posthumously won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1926. Imagist Movement The Imagist Movement took place in the early 20th century where English and American poets wrote free verse poetry. The poets devoted their poetry to contain clear expression of visual images rather than abstract language. Amy Lowell, the poet of "The Taxi", was seen as the movement leader and influenced free verse poets everywhere. The Taxi When I go away from you
The world beats dead
Like a slackened drum.
I call out for you against the jutted stars
And shout into the ridges of the wind.
Streets coming fast,
One after the other,
Led you away from me,
And the lamps of the city prick my eyes
So that I can no longer see your face.
Why should I leave you,
To wound myself upon the sharp edges of the night? Title We originally thought the title "The Taxi" had to do with traveling, New York, crowded streets, or taxi drivers. Paraphrase When I go away from you
The world beats dead
Like a slackened drum.
I call out for you against the jutted stars
And shout into the ridges of the wind.
Streets coming fast,
One after the other,
Led you away from me,
And the lamps of the city prick my eyes
So that I can no longer see your face.
Why should I leave you,
To wound myself upon the sharp edges of the night? When I leave you
The world stops
Like a relaxed drum
I call out for you among the protruding stars
And shout into the cutting wind
Streets flying by,
One after the other,
Took you away from me,
And the lamps of the city blind me
So that I can no longer see your face.
Why should I leave you,
To hurt myself upon the dangerous things of the night. Connotation When I go away from you
The world beats dead
Like a slackened drum.
I call out for you against the jutted stars
And shout into the ridges of the wind.
Streets coming fast,
One after the other,
Led you away from me,
And the lamps of the city prick my eyes
So that I can no longer see your face.
Why should I leave you,
To wound myself upon the sharp edges of the night? Simile: The world beats dead Like a slackened drum
- the world seems off beat when they're apart Imagery: I call out for you...jutted stars...shout into the ridges of the wind
-creating sharp images to express the pain Imagery: Streets coming fast one after the other
-the speaker feels the world is passing her by while she is staying in the same place Metaphor: And the lamps of the city prick my eyes
-the lamps are bright but the tears are what is making it really painful Attitude The attitude and tone of "The Taxi" is anguished, depressed, and longing. When I go away from you
The world beats dead
Like a slackened drum.
I call out for you against the jutted stars
And shout into the ridges of the wind.
Streets coming fast,
One after the other,
Led you away from me,
And the lamps of the city prick my eyes
So that I can no longer see your face.
Why should I leave you,
To wound myself upon the sharp edges of the night? Shifts When I go away from you
The world beats dead
Like a slackened drum.
I call out for you against the jutted stars
And shout into the ridges of the wind.
Streets coming fast,
One after the other,
Led you away from me,
And the lamps of the city prick my eyes
So that I can no longer see your face.
Why should I leave you,
To wound myself upon the sharp edges of the night? Shift: Shifts from explaining how bad the pain is to asking why they did that to them self. Conclusion Title Revisited: The title not only expresses the literal meaning of a taxi but symbolizes the pain and sorrow of separation, just as one might feel when riding in a taxi leaving someone else. Theme: The more feeling and love one has for another, the harder it is to let go and allow distance. by: Amy Lowell
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