Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Poetic Devices / Figurative Language

No description
by

Sheila Whittle

on 9 September 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Poetic Devices / Figurative Language

Poetic Devices / Figurative Language
Alliteration
The repetition of consonant sounds at the beginning of two or more words.

Consonants are any letter that is NOT a vowel:
a, e, i, o, u
Assonance
The repetition of vowel sounds.

Vowels are:
a, e, i, o, u, and sometimes y

Example:
"Rise high in the bright sky"
repeats the long vowel /i/
Hyperbole
An exaggeration or overstatement used to emphasize a point, evoke (create) strong feelings and illustrate a stronger image.

Example:
I was bored to death.
My backpack weighed a ton.
Imagery
A strong description using vivid language to paint a picture that the reader can visualize.

Appeals to the senses (see, hear, taste, touch/feel, smell)

Example:
There was blood and guts
But here's what really got me:
he had pretty eyes
and they glistened still

from "Squished Squirrel Poem"
by Ralph Fletcher
Similes
Metaphors
Comparing two unlikely things.

Unlike a simile, you are saying that something IS another thing.

Example:
The poet is a bird "Soaring high, / Up into the / Limitless sky."

From "The Bird"
by Ernesto Santiago


Onomatopoeia
The use of words that sound like what they mean.



Example:
It SHUSHES
It hushes
The loudness in the road.
It flitter-twitters,

From "Cynthia in the Snow"
by Gwendolyn Brooks
Personification
Giving human qualities to something that is:
inanimate (not alive)
abstract (thoughts and feelings)
nonhuman (animals)

Example:
But I pictured my lost poems / scurrying on little feet
from "Lost Poems" by Ralph Fletcher
Repetition
Repeating a sound, word, phrase, line, or stanza in a poem

Repetition is used to:
Emphasize something that is important
Clarify (or make clearer) certain ideas
Help make a poem visually attractive
Create a better rhythm or flow in the poem
Establish meaning




Example:

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

from "Do not go gentle into that good night"
by Dylan Thomas
Rhyme
Two or more words that end in the same sound.

A
rhyme scheme
is the pattern of the rhyming lines.
(ex: ABAB, ABBA, ABCABC)

He gives his harness bells a shake
A
To ask if there is some mistake.
A

The only other sound's the sweep
B
Of easy wind and downy flake.
A

The woods are lovely, dark, and deep.
B
But I have promises to keep,
B
And miles to go before I sleep.
B
And miles to go before I sleep.
B

from "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening"
by Robert Frost

Example:
P
eter
P
iper
p
icked a
p
eck of
p
ickled
p
eppers;

A peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked;
If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers,

Where's the peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked?
Comparing two unlike things using like, as, than, etc...

Example:
I was as hungry as a bear.

What happens to a dream deferred?
Does it dry up
like a raisin in the sun?

from "A Dream Deferred"
by Langston Hughes
Consonance
The repetition of consonant sounds, especially at the
end
of a word.
Examples:
He stru
ck
a strea
k
of bad lu
ck
.
P
i
tt
er,
p
a
tt
er

"Rap re
j
e
c
ts
my tape de
ck
,
e
j
e
c
ts pro
j
e
c
tile
Whether
J
ew or
g
en
tile
"
from Zealots by the Fugees
Full transcript