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Starside - 1st Grade - One Tiny Turtle

Creating prior knowledge for the Rigby Literacy by Design Theme 11 story - One Tiny Turtle.
by

Whitney Mason

on 9 February 2012

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Transcript of Starside - 1st Grade - One Tiny Turtle

In my head:
What I know about turtles Turtles have shells that cover their backs and shells that cover their stomachs. The shells are made from bony plates that get bigger
and harder as the turtle grows. Fish breathe underwater, but turtles are reptiles and need to come up to the surface for air. They do this every 4 to 5 minutes when they are active. When they are asleep, they can stary underwater for hours. Male turtles wait just off the nesting beaches. They mate with the females. Then the females come ashore to lay eggs. Coming ashore is very risky for sea turtles - they can easily overheart and die. So they only nest at night or in cool weather. Then they get back to the sea as soon as possible Females stay close to their nesting beach for several months. In that time they usually make at least 4 nests, and sometimes as many as 10. Turtle eggs in warm sand can be ready to hatch in 6 weeks. If the sand is cool, they can take 3 weeks longer. The horizon, where the sea meets the sky, tells baby turtles which way to turn to get to the water. But street lights and buildings next to the beach can confuse them and make them go the wrong way. In the book:
One Tiny Turtle
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