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Complements: Direct Objects, Indirect Objects, Predicate Nominatives, Predicate Adjectives

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Lydia Elgas

on 28 April 2014

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Transcript of Complements: Direct Objects, Indirect Objects, Predicate Nominatives, Predicate Adjectives

Direct Objects
A direct object is a noun or a pronoun
that receives the action of the verb. A
direct object answer the question Whom? or What? after a transitive verb. (Remember that a transitive verb TRANSFERS action.).

Examples of Direct Objects
Today, I met
Dr. Mason
.

My uncle repairs small
engines
, and then he sells
them
.
A direct object can never follow a linking verb because a linking verb does NOT express action.
Identifying Direct Objects
1. Many sports test an athlete's speed and agility.
2. However, long-distance, or marathon, swimming requires strength and endurance from an athlete.
3. A swimmer in training may swim five or six miles every day.
4. Marathon swimmers smear grease on their legs and arms for protection against the cold water.
5. Fatigue, pain, and huge waves challenge marathon swimmers.
6. As they swim, they endure extreme isolation from the rest of the world.
7. Toward the end of the marathon, swimmers hear the loud applause and shouts of encouragement from their fans.
8. Spectators can watch only the finish of a marathon.
9. Nevertheless, they know the long distance that athletes have traveled.
10. Emerging from the water, exhausted swimmers have successfully completed another marathon.
Answers
1. Many sports test an athlete's
speed
and
agility
.
2. However, long-distance, or marathon, swimming requires
strength
and
endurance
from an athlete.
3. A swimmer in training may swim five or six
miles
every day.
4. Marathon swimmers smear
grease
on their legs and arms for protection against the cold water.
5. Fatigue, pain, and huge waves challenge marathon
swimmers
.
6. As they swim, they endure extreme
isolation
from the rest of the world.
7. Toward the end of the marathon, swimmers hear the loud
applause
and
shouts
of encouragement from their fans.
8. Spectators can watch only the
finish
of a marathon.
9. Nevertheless, they know the long
distance
that athletes have traveled.
10. Emerging from the water, exhausted swimmers have successfully completed another
marathon
.
Indirect Objects
An
indirect object
is a noun or pronoun that comes between the verb and the direct object. It tells
to whom
or
to what
, or
for whom
or
for what
, the action of the verb is done.

The Waiter gave
her
a smile.

Pam left the
waiter
a tip.
Indirect Object Practice
1. The usher found us seats near the stage.

2. I'll gladly lend you my typewriter.

3. The Nobel Committee gave Octavio Paz the Nobel Prize for literature.

4. Please show me your beaded moccasins.

5. Mai told the children stories about her family's escape from Vietnam.
Complements
A complement is a word or a group of words that completes the meaning of a verb.

Complements can come in the form of-

Direct Objects
Indirect Objects
Predicate Nominatives
Predicate Adjectives
Identify the Direct Object and Indirect Object in each sentence
1. The usher found
us

seats
near the stage.

2. I'll gladly lend
you
my
typewriter
.

3. The Nobel Committee gave
Octavio Paz
the
Nobel Prize
for literature.

4. Please show
me
your beaded
moccasins
.

5. Mai told the
children

stories
about her family's escape from Vietnam.
Direct Objects
and
Indirect Objects
Subject Complements
A subject complement completes the meaning of a linking verb and identifies or describes the subject.

Examples:
Julio has been
president
of his class since October.

Barbara looks
sleepy
this morning.
A subject complement completes the meaning of a linking verb and identifies or describes the subject.

A
predicate nominative
is a
noun or pronoun
that follows a linking verb and explains or identifies the subject of the sentence.

A
predicate adjective
is an
adjective
that follows a linking verb and describes the subject of the sentence.
Subject Complements
Predicate Nominative
*Renames the subject in the predicate
Example:

Julio
has been
president
of his class since October.

We
are the
delegates
from our school.
Predicate Adjective
*Describes the subject in the predicate.

Examples:
Cold
lemonade
tastes
good
on a hot day.

The pita
bread
was
delicious
!
Practice
Identify the complements (direct object, indirect object, predicate nominative, or predicate adjective) in each sentence.
1. Leatherstocking was a fictional scout in Cooper's Leatherstocking Tales.
2. He was a woodcrafter and a trapper.
3. He could not read, but he understood the lore of the woods.
4. To generations of readers, this character has become a hero.
5. He could always face any emergency.
6. He always remained faithful and fearless.
7. Leatherstocking loved the forest and the open country.
8. In later years he grew miserable.
9. The destruction of the wilderness by settlers and others greatly disturbed him.
10. He told no one his views and retreated from civilization.
Complements Review
Identify the
word
in the sentence as a Direct Object, Indirect Object, Predicate Nominative, or Predicate Adjective.

1. Our cat avoids
skunks
and
raccoons
.
2. Jim Thorpe was a famous American Indian
athlete
.
3. The teacher showed
us
a film.
4. The television commercials for that new product sound
silly
.
5. Who put the
roses
in that vase?
Full transcript