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Spark! Youth Voices Against Violence Audio Curriculum and Program Guide

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Roni Ayalla

on 15 March 2014

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Transcript of Spark! Youth Voices Against Violence Audio Curriculum and Program Guide

how do you define
ICE BREAKER
1. Share your name (if you are getting to know each other) and

2. Something you see as considered taboo
what's
taboo
to you?
is
youth violence
taboo?
Who IS talking about youth violence in your community? What are they saying?

Who ISN'T talking about youth violence? Why?

Who SHOULD be talking about youth violence?

Is it a topic that needs more attention? Less?
NORMS
FOR YOUTH | BY YOUTH
SAY WHAT?
"Youth violence is a public health concern."
If you could convey a single message to an audience (abusers, targets, community leaders, etc.) affected by youth violence, what would it be?
Who is missing from this equation?
Who are the other "players" in youth violence?
Who else is affected directly? Indirectly?
abusers
targets
Make a list:
}
MEDIA LITERACY
1. All media messages are carefully crafted.

2. Media messages are constructed using creative techniques.

3. Different people experience the same media message many ways.

4. Media have their own internal values and points of view.

5. Often, messages are created and sent to gain profit and/or power.
5 key concepts

: the ability to access, analyze, evaluate and create media in a variety of forms.
Make an album cover to accompany your audio piece! Use any tool you have handy to create square piece of art (5x5 inches is a good size).

Save your art and submit it with your audio piece.
SCRIPT
WRITING

STORYTELLING
narrative arc

tension
dramatic question
??
telling a story is often a response to a
a good story has
(a.k.a. drama; or action)
Example:
“how can politicians help end youth violence?"
??
3P's
PEER FEEDBACK
tips for
REHEARSE, REHEARSE, REHEARSE!
Read your script out loud, over and over again before you start recording.
Read it for a friend of teacher.
SPEAK NATURALLY
Aim for a tone of voice that sounds like you're having a conversation rather than reading a script.
SPREAD YOUR STORY
Social Network
BROADCAST
ADVOCATE
GATEKEEPER
In an effort to encourage and support youth to speak out YTech is announcing in partnership with Puget SoundOff and Tabu, its “Spark! Youth Voices Against Violence” audio contest.

Youth across the country are asked to submit audio pieces on the topic during the month of November.
If your group doesn't have a set of community norms that guides your time together, now is the time to make some.
Make a list of guidelines the group thinks are important for a healthy, productive work environment.

speak the truth – no exaggeration
be respectful
treat how you want to be treated
speak consciously and with meaning
give benefit of doubt
LISTEN TO OTHERS
step down and step back
Here's a list we like:
"where I'm from..."
This storytelling activity doubles as a way to get to know one another and their communities.
In a circle, share a little bit of information, starting with the phrase “Where I’m from, [neighborhood/state/community/country]...”

Examples:
"Where I’m from, adults around me didn’t help me feel safe; people with strict parents feel imprisoned in their own homes; I can’t be myself.”

"Where I'm from, you can get caught in the crossfire."

If there is a story to go along with it, tell it. If the tidbit or story resonates with your upbringing, snap your fingers at the end of that person’s turn.
beginning
middle
end
ELEMENTS
STORY
POINT
VOICE
your point of view & purpose
write your script the way you speak
SOUNDTRACK
music sets the tone & mood
IMAGERY*
photos, drawings, scanned items
ECONOMY
keep it focused and to the point
TENSION
no problems? no change.
of
ambient noises, or colorful descriptions from the narrator.
*audio:
(your story unfolds!)
*many stories are driven by a question/problem
telling a story is a response to that question
(what's important?)
(connect to beginning)
neat, resolved endings not required!
drama!
tension!
action!
PRE-PRODUCTION
Research Planning Script Review
PRODUCTION
Record Audio
POST-PRODUCTION
Editing
Review
Export
Sharing
&
The # symbol, called a
hashtag
, is used to mark keywords or topics in a Tweet. It was created organically by Twitter users as a way to categorize messages.
#hashtags
tags
Tags
are keywords that describe videos. A surfing video might be tagged with "surfing," "water," and "waves." Users who enjoy watching surfing videos can then search for any of those terms and that video will show up in their search results. Tags help you label your videos so that other people can more easily discover them.
Brainstorm a list of #hashtags and tags that relate to your media pieces and action projects on YouTube and Twitter as demonstrated in the screen grabs:
1.
2.
Search Keywords Related to Your Media/Projects
Search for related content
1.
2. Find ideas for related tags
Using tags and phrases from Activity One, and your personal knowledge of local organizations working in your project area, search for Facebook pages relevant to your project topic.
Search + Like + Post!
Finding Like-Minds
on Facebook
Once you 'Like' the page, you can post your content on their wall. Suddenly, your reach extends far beyond your network!
The “answer” to the question could be a call to action in your story:
"politicians should provide more opportunities for youth to succeed..."
Tips for Giving Feedback
Questions to Ask
What is the point of the audio piece?

Who is the intended audience?

Identify the beginning, middle and end.

What was great about the piece?

What could take the audio piece to the next level?

How does the piece inspire action or change?
Start with positive feedback.

Give the artist the space to ask questions and seek advice.

Ask clarifying questions.

Give suggestions that will help the artist tell their story more effectively.

Respect the artist's decision
to take advice or not.
take responsibility
embrace your growing moments/“growing edge”
TEAMWORK
maintain safe space
be present and involved
our stories stay here unless we put them out there on our own terms
{
Your turn! On a blank piece of paper, write your message to youth violence. Then, take a picture holding the message.
http://www.prx.org/pieces/74078-bullied-teen-stories-from-generation-prx

Follow the link and listen to segment C (20 minutes)
News stories in the 20th century almost always describe crime trends as “increasing,” even when actual crime statistics are stable.

Perpetrators are consistently described as younger and violence as worse than in previous eras, even when statistics do not bear this out.

Racial bias creeps into stories. Dehumanizing language like “recidivist” and “assailant” is used frequently in stories about violence committed by people of color, but not in stores about violence committed by whites.

Many stories leave readers with the impression that violence is inevitable, when in fact there are evidence-based interventions that have proven successful in reducing violence.
http://dartcenter.org/content/youth-violence-with-public-health-frame
http://www.nytimes.com/video/2012/07/31/nyregion/100000001694108/living-with-gun-violence.html
bullying
As a group, define and identify examples for each of the following types of violence.
Discuss how power and control play into each type.


Unwanted, aggressive behavior among school aged children that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. The behavior is repeated, or has the potential to be repeated, over time. (http://stopbullying.gov)
Physical violence occurs when someone uses a part of their body or an object to control your actions. Like: pushing, assault with an object or weapon, slapping, hair pulling.
A pattern of abusive behaviors used to exert power and control over a dating/intimate partner. Can include physical, sexual, and psychological attacks, as well as economic coercion (http://breakingthecycle.org)
Emotional violence occurs when someone says or does something to make you feel stupid or worthless. Like name calling, constant criticism, intimidation, stalking.
Can include: forced sex or sexual acts; forced prostitution, or unfounded allegations of promiscuity. (http://www.gov.nl.ca/VPI/types/index.html)
bullying
sexual violence
dating/domestic
emotional
physical
dating
violence
How is violence defined and portrayed in the media?
Framing Matters

Media scholars and journalists have long recognized that it is not only the story but
how the story is framed that matters.

Given the same set of facts, an incident of youth violence could be presented as:
an isolated act of an unstable individual,
part of an unstoppable crime wave or
one piece of a wider public health problem.
Next, listen to the following stories media stories about youth violence from around the country.
1. Do you think youth violence is a problem in your community? Why or why not?

2. List the pros and cons of a prevention program or strategy to combat violence you heard about.

3. If you were an Attorney General or person in power, how would you try to stop youth violence in this country?

4. What roles can young people play in stopping youth violence?
Next, you'll listen to some audio stories made by youth.
As you listen to these stories, think about the type of audio piece you will want to create and submit to the Youth Voices Against Violence contest.
by Bruce G, Seattle
by Devin, Seattle
DEFINING VIOLENCE
Violence in the Media
by Ameera, Seattle
haven't had enough?
click the files to
play to more stories.
by Daryius, Seattle
by Brittany, Seattle
AWESOME AUDIO
Use the template and prompts below to create an outline, or script, for your audio submission. No matter which way you choose to record your story, you need to prepare a script!
TOOLS:
Take your time to write your piece.

If you can, type up your prepared and perfected scripts.

Ask a friend or adult to look it over. Does it sound like you?

When you're happy with your script, it's time to record!
In groups or pairs, share your scripts. Even if you have more work to do, it's helpful to bounce ideas off others.
YTech @
YMCA of Greater Seattle
“This is an opportunity for youth to express themselves using music, poetry, dialogue or even a voicemail to demonstrate the urgent need for youth violence awareness and prevention.”
-- Colleen McDevitt, YTech Digital Media Educator and founder of Tabu.
Welcome!
Use these buttons to navigate Prezi.
Press forward now.
You can also use your keyboard.
forward
backward
A call for audio projects!
judging:
One Grand Prize Project to receive a grant award of $500. This first place audio piece will be featured prominently on PugetSoundOff.org and TabuTalk.org, as well as published locally.
Two Awards of Excellence will each receive a grant award of $250 and will be featured online.
what we're looking for:
- documentary / interviews
- autobiographical / personal essay
- skits / dialogue
- spoken word / poetry
- music
- combination of all styles!
full contest rules & details: http://pugetsoundoff.org/YouthViolence/Contest

1. Navigate the guide by using the arrow keys at the bottom of this frame.

2. Use the slider to peek at content further along in the Prezi, or jump to a particular section.

3. Switch to full screen mode and use your keyboard to navigate our Prezi curriculum guide!

4. If you get lost, just press your left keyboard arrow to return to where you started.

5. Zooming in and out will take you off the chosen path...but that's okay!

Go ahead, press the right arrow to get started!
-- YTech, Tabu & Puget SoundOff
Welcome to Youth Voices Against Violence Program Guide.
Get started with Prezi by using the tips below:
We've included additional links to stories so that you can customize the stories for your group.
SUBMIT TO THE CONTEST
Next, you're going to use the album art you created to turn your audio piece into a video file. Sharing a video file via social networks is easier than sharing an audio file.
Tutorials on turning an audio piece into a visual slideshow:
using a PC and Movie Maker:
http://support.google.com/youtube/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=1696878&hl=en-US

using a Mac and iMovie:
http://support.google.com/youtube/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=1696878&hl=en-US
Don't stop once you submit to the contest!
Pledge to share your story in multiple ways. Even consider hosting a listening party and inviting community members, friends, family...the sky is the limit!
SHARE YOUR STORY
by Stanley, Seattle
taboo?
{
Double click on a definition to zoom in.
parents
community members
bystanders
friends
peers
family
politicians

- document the life of an individual or group coping with the effects of youth violence
- identify and dispel stereotypes and misunderstandings society has about youth violence
- identify a specific example of hope, a positive story about real people or community groups that will inspire listeners
- recite a truthful letter or powerful message to yourself or others about youth violence
- acknowledge your role in activism against youth violence and raise your voice!
- maybe even try to write a comedy skit or use satire to make a thoughtful and entertaining piece
ideas:
Produce an audio piece --5 minutes or less--
that demonstrates the urgent need for youth violence awareness.
No way to record?
No problem!

Leave a voicemail to youth violence and you could win a $20 gift card!

Visit the contest site for details.
ELIMINATE BACKGROUND NOISE
Beware of air conditioners, fans, rustling papers, appliances, etc.
ALBUM THUMBNAIL
Photoshop
Instagram
Paint
a marker
a pencil
crayons
Photobucket...
Congratulations! You've made a great audio piece! Time to share it!
Crafting this simple message will help you begin to think about the audio message you will create.
Full transcript