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The Cask of Amontillado

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by

Morgan Gower

on 28 January 2014

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Transcript of The Cask of Amontillado

Some other festivities also include dancing in the streets. People wore colorful and elaborate costumes like the one below.
The Cask of Amontillado
Montresor
despises
Fortunato

Game Plan
Story Background
Story Summary
Literary Terminology
Poe's Tortured Life
Poster
Vocab Game
C
L
A
S
S

C
A
R
N
I
V
A
L
!
Reenactment
Conclusion
Any Questions?
"The Cask of Amontillado" takes place in a
catacomb
- an underground tunnel where Catholics buried their dead.
"The Cask of Amontillado" is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe.
Presentation by
Morgan Gower
{ and }
Dana Weiss
The events in the story unfold during Italian carnival, a wide-spread celebration before the first day of Lent.
Literary Terms
Characterization
Setting
Plot
Conflict
Simile
Symbol
Irony
Point of View
- Unreliable Narration
Theme
What they are and how they're used:
Point of View
Symbol
Simile
:)
Edgar Allan Poe
He was a tortured man...
He was a foster child of an extremely wealthy family after his father left and his mother died.

Foster dad =
David Poe (father) left family
Elizabeth Arnold Poe (mother) died (1811)
In 1837 he married his 13-year-old cousin,
Virginia Eliza Clemm Poe
, but she died of Tuberculosis at the age of 23, in 1847.
Characterization
Setting
Plot
Conflict
Irony
Unreliable Narration
Theme
(Man vs...)
Conflict is a struggle between two opposing forces.
There are two categories of conflict - internal and external.
Internal
conflicts occur inside a character's mind. This is known as
Man vs. Self
.
External
Conflict involves the character and some opposing outside force.
Man
vs.
Man, Man
vs.
Nature, and Man
vs.
Society are all
external
conflicts.
Most of the
conflict
in the story are external -
Man vs. Man
.
Montresor strongly
dislikes
Fortunato, but he
pretends
to be his friend in order to
entice
him into the catacombs to his death. This
trickery
(and the murder) is an example of
Man vs. Man conflict
.
After her death Poe went into a terrible depression. He already had a difficult life, and losing his only refuge destroyed him.
Poe was an avid drinker with a gambling problem, but his wife kept him in check.
Two years after her death
he hit a
low point
and was found,
delirious

(semi-conscious, out of it)
, in a
gutter
near a
Baltimore tavern
.
Edgar Allan Poe
died
(a few days after arriving at the hospital) on
October 7th, 1849
.
Hospital Poe died in - spent 4 days here
Original burial site
Poe's Monument
(Monument)
Tuberculosis takes Virginia Eliza Clemm Poe
1847
1837
Poe marries 13 year-old cousin
He never recovered himself enough to explain what happened to him, so theories vary. Some of them are:
Alcoholism (Overdose)
Rabies
A mugging
Tuberculosis
Edgar Allan Poe
First published in November of 1846
Modern scene (float)
Modern scene (costumes)
1800s Venetian masks
1800s carnival scene
:)
Carnival is celebrated with many festivities, including doing or eating the things you are going to give up. This is because it is the last time you'll get to do it for all 40 days of Lent.
The cold and the dark were also ideal for aging and storing wine.
Wine and bodies go here
Edgar Allan Poe spent October 3-7, 1849 in a hospital.
10/7/1849
The way an author reveals a character's personality to the reader.
Direct
Indirect
"[Fortunato] was a man to be respected and even feared."

"In painting and gemmary, Fortunato... was a quack."

"I was skillful in the Italian vintages"

"[Fortunato] wore motley. He had on a tight-fitting parti-striped dress, and his head was surmounted by the conical cap and bells."

"You (Fortunato) are rich, respected, admired, beloved; you are happy, as once I was."

"F: 'You do not comprehend?'
M: ' Not I.'
F: 'Then you are not of the brotherhood!'
(Montresor is not a Freemason, but Fortunato is.)

" ... the noble Fortunato."
"I continued, as was my wont, to
smile
in his face, and he did not perceive that my smile now was at the thought of
his immolation
."
"The thousand injuries of Fortunato I had borne as best I could, but when he ventured upon insult, I vowed revenge. You, who so well know the nature of my soul, will not suppose, however, that I gave utterance to a threat. At length I would be avenged; this was a point definitely settled -- but the very definitiveness with which it was resolved precluded the idea of risk. I must not only punish, but punish with impunity. A wrong is unredressed when retribution overtakes its redresser. It is equally unredressed when the avenger fails to make himself felt as such to him who has done the wrong."
Montresor orders the
attendants
of his palazzo
to
stay inside
, but assures them that he
will not be back until morning. He is
confident that
nobody will be around
when
he
murders Fortunato
, thus showing
his knowledge of
human psychology
.
Throughout the story
Montresor is polite
towards Fortunato, treating him like a guest (
instead
of the
doomed prisoner
that he is), and
pretending to care
about his
health.
"The gait of my friend was unsteady,"
and similar statements suggesting the extreme

drunkenness

of
Fortunato
.
"I made bold to seize Fortunato by an arm above the elbow."
Montresor is getting
excited
about the
murder
that
he alone knows
is close at hand. He is also growing more
confident
in his actions, because he is confident that
Fortunato is hopelessly lost
in the catacombs.
Montresor is
impatient
for Fortunato to be
chained to the wall
, and he isn't going to give him
any chance
to get away once he finds that
he's been tricked
.
Montresor
has
prepared
for this,
setting up
the
chains
in the niche, hiding
bricks
and mortar in a pile of bones, and hiding a
trowel
in his jacket.
He takes a
break
from walling in Fortunato to sit on the bones and
listen
as he starts to
die
.
When
Fortunato
begins to
scream
, Montresor
screams back
louder and stronger. This tells us that Montresor knows that

nobody can hear
a thing, and that he is thoroughly
enjoying
the murder.
Fortunato
, just as he is about to die, begins
laughing
about the cleverness of the crime. He looks
forward
to the
peace
that he sees ahead of him, and he seems to
forgive Montresor
for burying him alive.
Montresor struggles
with the weight of the last brick, he
listens
for a
reply
from Fortunato (after saying "for the love of God"), and his
heart grows sick
when he hears only the jingling of bells.
Montresor is patient, but determined to get revenge, and get away with it.
Montresor is smiling at Fortunato because he is thinking about murdering him.
"He stepped
unsteadily
forward, while I followed
immediately
at his heels."
This all shows us
Montresor's regret
, but he recovers himself quickly. He
blames
the niter for the sickness in his heart, and he
hurries
to
finish
the wall instead of tearing it down.
Montresor
Fortunato
Antagonist
Flat
Static
Motivation?
REVENGE
Protagonist
Round
Dynamic
Imperfect
Not stock characters
Do not fit any stereotypes
Questions
Speak up!
The when(s) and where(s) of a story.
Late evening
Carnival season
Italy
The Montresor family vaults (under the main character's home)
WHEN?
WHERE?
The series of events that make up the story
Exposition
Rising Action
Climax
Falling Action
Resolution
You learn:
Background info
Characters
Setting/atmosphere
Main conflict
The beginning of a story.
Our Story...
Most of the story
Conflicts
develop, interest and
suspense
build
Most intense moment (near the end) of the story
Turning point
(Fortunato is walled in)

Main character faces a major conflict
(The insult posed by Fortunato)

Main character changes
(Montresor becomes a murderer)
The beginning of the end
Conflict quickly unravels
Getting rid of loose ends
Less intense
The main characters are
Montresor
and
Fortunato
Wrap it all up with a bow
Most of the problems are
resolved
(
hopefully
) -- this
ties up the tale
and usually gives the reader
closure
.
Vocab Game Time!!!!!!!
1)
2)
9)
6)
3)
4)
5)
12)
8)
7)
10)
11)
13)
14)
15)
16)
19)
18)
20)
Time to reenact the scene from the story where drunken Fortunato becomes dead Fortunato...
17)
A few seconds of
internal
(Man vs. Self)

conflict
appear at the end of the story, just after Fortunato speaks his
last words
and Montresor feels
sick
and
struggles
with the weight of the last brick.
Simile is the comparison of two unlike things or situations using "like" or "as."
An example of simile in the story is...
"The niter! ... See, it increases.
It
hangs
like

moss
upon the vaults."
This is an example of simile because it compares
"it"
- the niter - to
"moss"
using the word like.
Point of View is the vantage point from which the story is told. It is either first, second, or third person.
"The Cask of Amontillado" is told through the (first person) unreliable narration of Montresor.
First Person -

Uses the pronoun "I," shows the thoughts and emotions of only one character.
Second Person -

Very uncommon in literature, uses the pronoun "you."
Third Person -

Omniscient or limited, uses pronouns "he," "she," "they," etc.
Narrators aren't
always
truthful. Whether they're

lying
or they just
don't know
what they're talking about, you
can't always believe
everything they say.

Montresor is
unreliable
. Because he's biased - he believes that Fortunato has done him a
terrible wrong
. We never find out for certain what he did, or
if he even did anything
, so we need to sift through Montresor's opinion to
find our own
.
Theme is the central insight that a story gives us about human life. It's the main idea expressed in a literary work.
The theme of "The Cask of Amontillado" is...
Be careful who you trust.
Don't mistake kindness for innocence.
Anything that has meaning for itself and also stands for something greater than or beyond itself. Symbols are used to add depth and meaning to a story.
Fortunado's outfit:
The madness of carnival season:
The cask of amontillado:
Montresor's name:
The Montresor family motto:
"The white webwork" (niter):
The words "cask" and "casket" have the same root.
Fortunato is very drunk, probably on wine.
Fortunato's love of wine leaves him open to flattery and trickery, which Montresor happily provides.
He is dressed as a jester, also called a fool. This is a visual representation of Montresor's plan to kill him without him even knowing it.
Represents the supreme madness in the narrator's mind.
"Mon tresor"
is French for "my treasure." The treasure that the narrator possesses is the knowledge of the perfect revenge - and the ability to carry it out.
"Nemo me impune lacessit"
is Latin for "No one provokes me with impunity." That means that nobody can insult Montresor and get away with it.
This symbolizes the web that Fortunato is caught in; Montresor has trapped him like a clever spider.
Main (title) symbol
Irony is a separation from what we would want or expect to happen in a story. There are three kinds of irony: verbal, dramatic, and situational.
Our story contains all three types of irony, and a lot of it.
Verbal irony is when a writer or speaker says something, and means something completely different (sarcasm).
Some examples of this are:
-Fortunato's name is Italian for fortunate. It is an ironic name for someone who is about to be buried alive.

-Montresor 's diction throughout the story:
"My dear Fortunato, you are luckily met."
"I will not impose upon your good nature."
"We will go back; you will be ill, and I cannot be responsible."

-Fortunato saying "I will not die of a cough," and Montresor replying "True."

-Fortunato states that Luchesi is an ignoramus, when in fact it is he who is the ignorant one.
Dramatic Irony is when a reader or audience knows something that a character is the story doesn't know.
An example of this is:
-In the first couple sentences of the story, Montresor vows revenge. We do not know why he despises Fortunato. Fortuanto does not know that he "smiles at the thought of his immolation."
Situational Irony is when the writer lets something happen that they have not led us to expect.
Some examples of situational irony are:
- The way that Montresor treats Fortunato throughout the plot. He smiles at him, greets him warmly, and wrings his hand.

- They toast the wine to Fortunato's long life even as Montresor is leading him to his death.

- Fortunato is dressed as a jester, also known as a court fool. This is ironic because Montresor plans to have him die as an idiot or a fool.
or


Player A: Round 1

- Something said; the act of saying something
Player B: Round 1

- To take revenge for
Player C: Round 1

- Punishment
Player D: Round 1

- Murder or destruction
Player E: Round 1

- Artistically skilled
Player A: Round 2

- To confront boldly
Player C: Round 2

- Type of wine
Player D: Round 2

- Storage cellars
Player E: Round 2

- Unbearable
Player B: Round 2

- Candlesticks or flaming pieces of wood
Please split the room in half, move your desks to the sides, stand in a circle, and we will explain the rules.
Player A: Round 3

- A type of sherry
Player B: Round 3

- Out of the way; secluded
Player C: Round 3

- A fool; a dunce
Player D: Round 3

- A hole or recess in a wall
Player E: Round 3

- Chained
Player A: Round 4

- To beg or ask someone earnestly
Player B: Round 4

- A mixture of lime or cement or a combination of both with sand and water, used as a bonding agent between bricks, stones, etc.
Player C: Round 4

- Listen with attention
Player D: Round 4

- Slender two-edged sword
Player E: Round 4

- Hurried or rushed
-Utterance
-John gave an annoying utterance.
-Avenged
-I avenged my dead brother by punishing his killer.
-Retribution
-The retribution he received after committing the crime seemed fair.
-Immolation
-Everyone was horrified by the immolation that took place during World War II.
-Virtuoso
-Jimi Hendrix was widely considered to be a guitar virtuoso.
-Accosted
-Mrs. Peterlin accosted Dana, and punished her for cheating.
-Flambeaux
-Indiana Jones needed a flambeaux to find his way through the booby-trapped cave.
-Sherry
-My grandmother used to love to have a glass of sherry after dinner.
-Vaults
-He had many vaults in which to store his wine.
-Insufferably
-The movie was insufferably boring.
-Amontillado
-Amontillado is a great wine.
-Remote
-Our summer cabin is in a remote area.
-Ignoramus
-SpongeBob was an ignoramus when it came to the hooks.
-Niche
-The niche in the tree sheltered the squirrel from the storm.
-Fettered
-The maniac at the mental hospital was fettered to the wall.
-Implore
-I implore you to let me go to the party even though I am grounded.
-Mortar
-The mortar between the bricks was dyed purple.
-Hearken
-The fireman asked the students to hearken his safety instructions.
-Rapier
-Old Blackbeard slashed him with his rapier.
-Hastened
-She hastened down the street to catch the bus.
Full transcript