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f

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Zaiba Fatima

on 22 October 2012

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Transcript of f

Plants and Flowers Structures and functions Process Of Growth Seed Roots The Root System

Underground (usually)
Anchor the plant in the soil
Absorb water and nutrients
Conduct water and nutrients
Food Storage The starting of a plants life.
The seed consisted of Embryo
the baby part of the plant. Seed Coat:
An almost airtight protective covering of the seed The Shoot System
Above ground (usually)
Elevates the plant above the soil
Many functions including:
photosynthesis
reproduction & dispersal
food and water conduction Stem and Leaves Seed Coat Embryo Cotyledon Roots Root Hair LEAVES STEM Over hery Pollen/Pollinators Pollen
pollen: The fine powderlike material consisting of pollen grains that is produced by the anthers of seed plants. Pollenation: process of male sex cell reaching out to the stigma of another plant. Pollinators: EXP: bee, hummingbird,. butterfly's, humans, wind, moths, ant. There are over 400,000 different species of flowers covering the planet. Flowers are found almost everywhere and people grow accustomed to seeing them without realising the speciality of each little bloom. Roses are related to apples, raspberries, cherries, peaches, plums, nectarines, pears and almonds.

2. Tulip bulbs were more valuable than gold in Holland in the 1600s.

3. Ancient civilizations burned aster leaves to ward off evil spirits.

4. Tulip bulbs can be substituted for onions in a recipe.

5. Chrysanthemums are associated with funerals in Malta and are considered unlucky.

6. The very expensive spice, saffron, comes from a type of crocus flower.

7. The largest flower in the world is the titan arums, which produce flowers 10 feet high and 3 feet wide. The flowers smell of decaying flesh and are also known as corpse flowers.

8. Almost 60 percent of fresh-cut flowers grown in the U.S. come from California.

9. Hundreds of years ago, when Vikings invaded Scotland, they were slowed by patches of wild thistle, allowing the Scots time to escape. Because of this, the wild thistle was named Scotland’s national flower.

10. The lotus was considered a sacred flower by ancient Egyptians and was used in burial rituals. This flower blooms in rivers and damp wetlands, but may lie dormant for years during times of drought, only to rise again with the return of water. Egyptians viewed it as a symbol of resurrection and eternal life.

11. Scientists discovered the world’s oldest flower in 2002, in northeast China. The flower, named Archaefructus sinensis bloomed around 125 million years ago and resembles a water lily.

12. The juice from bluebell flowers was used historically to make glue. 13. Foxglove is an old English name, derived from the belief that foxes slipped their feet into the leaves of the plant to sneak up on prey.

14. Dandelions might seem like weeds, but the flowers and leaves are a good source of vitamins A and C, iron, calcium and potassium. One cup of dandelion greens provides 7,000-13,000 I.U. of vitamin A.

15. The flower buds of the marsh marigold are pickled as a substitute for capers.

16. Sunflowers move throughout the day in response to the movement of the sun from east to west.

17. Moon flowers bloom only at night, closing during the day.

18. Flowering nicotiana is related to tobacco, from which cigarettes are made.

19. Gas plants produce a clear gas on humid, warm nights. This gas is said to be ignitable with a lit match.

20. When Mormon pioneers arrived in the Salt Lake Valley, they subsisted on the roots of the Sego Lily Plant. This plant is the state flower of Utah.

21. The cornstarch-like powder known as arrowroot is derived from the plant, Marantha arundinacea, and is native to India. It was used by indigenous people to draw out the toxins from a poisoned arrow wound. Today, it is used to thicken pies and jellies.

22. Angelica was used in Europe for hundreds of years as a cure for everything from the bubonic plague to indigestion. It was thought to ward off evil spirits.

23. Blue cohosh, also known as squaw root or papoose root, was used by Native American women to ensure an easy labor and childbirth.

24. During the Middle Ages, lady’s mantle was thought to have magic healing properties.

25. When Achilles was born, his mother dipped him head first in a bath of yarrow tea, believing it had protective qualities. Yarrow is still known for healing and was used during World War I to heal soldiers’ wounds.

The next time you walk through a flower garden, take a minute to consider the individual plants growing there. One of them may hold the secret for curing a dreaded disease. Another may have a long, illustrious history. Every flower has qualities and attributes worth admiring. FLOWER FACTS More than 200,000 animal species serve as pollinators. Most are insects — only about 1,000 are hummingbirds, bats, or other small mammals.
Flowers that rely on daytime pollinators are often brightly colored. Flowers that bloom at night are often more pale in color and instead emit
sweet perfumes or other strong odors to attract moths, bats, and other nocturnal pollinators.
Bees come from wasps, evolutionally speaking. Actually, so do ants.
The flowers of the Saguaro cactus are open both day and night so that they can be pollinated by bees, bats, and birds. Their most efficient pollinator? The Western White-Winged Dove!
Pollen comes in many colors.
Most bees like warm areas, but there are bees that live in the Arctic and way up high in the Andes and Himalayas.
Migrating pollinators follow nectar corridors during their travel. Keep those flyways full of blooming flowers!
Some bees vibrate their flight muscles in order to knock pollen onto the stigma. Bumblebees do this for tomatoes, blueberries, and cranberries.
The number of pollinators in an area is a great indicator of the overall health of an ecosystem. Roses are edible
Yes, you read that right. Most people might not know this, but roses are edible and as with many edible flowers,
they actually are quite tasty! Some claim they taste like a sweet apple fruit and others fail to be able to describe the taste of a rose. There are many recipes for the use of roses online, but a favorite is always candied rose petals, which are a great confection to decorate cookies, cakes and puddings, as well as rose jam for fantastic petit fours. You can also freeze roses in ice cubes, float them in punches and sprinkle them on your favorite flan. Remember, if you are going to use roses for any type of food, it is imperative you use organic roses that are 100% pesticide free. Also make sure to remove the bitter white portion of the petals. Sunflower's seeds are nutritious
Sunflower seeds are one of the highest concentrates of vitamin E around, and they are an amazing summer snack. Raw sunflower seeds are more nutritious, carry more protein and have a higher concentration of vitamin E than roasted sunflower seeds – but your taste is what is most important. You can sprinkle shelled sunflower seeds on cereals, salads, trail mix and even mix it in with your pesto sauce. If you choose to roast your sunflower seeds, toss a handful or two of raw sunflower seeds into a dry non-stick skillet. Using high heat, stir continuously until seeds turn light golden brown, about 2 or 3 minutes. Watch them carefully to avoid burning. As soon as they begin to turn brown remove from the heat. Sunflower's seeds are nutritious
Sunflower seeds are one of the highest concentrates of vitamin E around, and they are an amazing summer snack. Raw sunflower seeds are more nutritious, carry more protein and have a higher concentration of vitamin E than roasted sunflower seeds – but your taste is what is most important. You can sprinkle shelled sunflower seeds on cereals, salads, trail mix and even mix it in with your pesto sauce. If you choose to roast your sunflower seeds, toss a handful or two of raw sunflower seeds into a dry non-stick skillet. Using high heat, stir continuously until seeds turn light golden brown, about 2 or 3 minutes. Watch them carefully to avoid burning. As soon as they begin to turn brown remove from the heat. Sunflower's seeds are nutritious
Sunflower seeds are one of the highest concentrates of vitamin E around, and they are an amazing summer snack. Raw sunflower seeds are more nutritious, carry more protein and have a higher concentration of vitamin E than roasted sunflower seeds – but your taste is what is most important. You can sprinkle shelled sunflower seeds on cereals, salads, trail mix and even mix it in with your pesto sauce. If you choose to roast your sunflower seeds, toss a handful or two of raw sunflower seeds into a dry non-stick skillet. Using high heat, stir continuously until seeds turn light golden brown, about 2 or 3 minutes. Watch them carefully to avoid burning. As soon as they begin to turn brown remove from the heat.


Lavender is nature's relaxation tool
The smell of lavender can calm even the most stressful of folks. While lavender can be used for a variety of potions, teas, lotions and oils – one of the favorite and most simple ways to calm down after a long days work is to take a lavender bath. Taking a bath full of the smells and calming qualities of lavender is simple. Take a bunch (a handful is usually enough) of fresh or dried lavender flowers and crush them into the hot bath water with your hands. Let it soak for a minute or two and then hop on in. You will feel like a million bucks every day you indulge in this bath.

The vanilla bean comes from an orchid
The vanilla orchid is just as beautiful as every other orchid you find at the flower mart. However not many people know that the vanilla bean actually comes from an orchid. From essential oil, to candles, lotions and creme brule – vanilla is one of the most sought after scents, flavors and flowers around for cooking. The next time you go to buy vanilla extract to cook your favorite dessert, why not grab the real thing and purchase vanilla beans instead? You will be pleasantly surprised. There are two types of vanilla beans you can find at most specialty food shops – Bourbon and Tahitian. Both are unique in their flavor but equally delicious. ZAIBA F. MALIHA C. (cc) photo by medhead on Flickr SARA A. the stem
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