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KINETIC AND INTERACTIVE SCULPTURE

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Laura Lilienkamp

on 28 January 2014

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Transcript of KINETIC AND INTERACTIVE SCULPTURE

Machines
Arthur Ganson-
Was interested in programming and precision, and realized art was a way to combine logical flow and precision, as well as playfulness.
History
Science
Theo Jansen -

Evolves new, wind-powered life forms made of plastic, electrical conduit piping, and soda bottles

Arduino
Tangible product of the open source community specifically designed to allow people to create things, Arduino is "an inexpensive, open-source microcontroller electronics platform based on flexible, easy-to-use hardware and software" (Art + Science 120). Arduinos are often used in interactive installations.
Waves
Reuben Margolin-
Tries to combine the beauty and structure of the world in wave sculptures. All sculptures are complex versions of the same simple mechanism.



KINETIC
AND
INTERACTIVE
SCULPTURE

Edwin van der Heide-
Creates interactive environments, some using fog others mirrors... my favorite is this one, where lights emit vibrations and are sensed by radio-like machines, which translate the light's vibration into sound.
Interactivity
Raphael Lozono-Hemmer-
Creates interactive environments and pieces, for example lights which follow the path of the viewer, often comments on privacy and what that means in our world.
1880-1930: Science and art underwent radical changes.
Ideas about time and space had to be revised (in science, with relativity, in art, with perspective)
Science moved towards the theoretical, art towards the abstract
The Impressionist movement began
The invention of photography interested artists in capturing motion
Art and Science
Art and science have been intertwined since humans began to create art.
Cave paintings represent great strides in both artistic expression and anatomy
During the Rennisance, artists used science and the scientific method to create artwork; for example, anatomy and dissection were important to understanding and drawing the human form.


1880s-
Common Ideas
Many pieces have a sense of humor, are a little quirky, whimsical, etc.
The viewer is essential; in the words of Arthur Ganson, "The object itself means nothing at all. Once it's perceived, someone brings it into their own mind, there's a cycle that has completed. And to me that's the most important thing." In the words of Anne Lilly, "[My art is] about the experience, not a 'message.' I want people to experience something.
Art is essential to technology and science, science and technology are essential to art.
http://www.arthurganson.com/pages/Sculptures.html
Anne Lily-
Makes stainless steel, polished surface, mechanical sculptures.



http://www.annelilly.com/
Jean Tinguely (1925-1991)-
One of the first modern kinetic sculptures, created chaotic machines, such as his most famous, which destroyed itself until the New York fire Department decided to intervene.
http://www.tinguely.ch/en/museum_sammlung/jean_tinguely.html
A Homage to New York
The translation of circular motion to sinusoidal motion appears throughout different sculptor's work.
http://www.reubenmargolin.com/
John Douglas Powers-
Sculptures use a rotating metal device set up like a sine wave so that the objects attached to them move in a manner which evokes reeds or sensual, seductive movement (his words, not mine).

http://www.john-powers.com/
http://www.strandbeest.com/
http://blog.arduino.cc/
http://www.lozano-hemmer.com/
Karina Smigla-Bobinski-
Created an interactive drawing ball


Bibliography

Web and Print Resources:
Arthur Ganson: Moving Sculpture. Ted Talks. Ted Conferences, May 2008. Web. 4 Oct. 2013.

"The Gestalt Principles." Spokane Falls Graphic Design. Community Colleges of Spokane, n.d. Web. 17 Dec. 17.

Jones, Caroline A., ed. Sensorium: Embodied Experience, Technology, and Contemporary Art. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2006. Print.

Klanten, Robert, Sven Ehmann, and Verena Hanschke, eds. A Touch of Code: Interactive Installations and Experiences. N.p.: Gestalten, n.d. Print.

Popper, Frank. Origins and Development of Kinetic Art. Greenwich, CT: New York Graphic Society, 1968. Print.

Reuben Margolin: On Kinetic Art. YouTube. Google, 12 Mar. 2010. Web. 18 Nov. 2013.

Theo Jansen- The Great Pretender. YouTube. Google, 6 Nov. 2008. Web. 18 Nov. 2013.

Wilson, Stephen. Art + Science Now. New York. Thames & Hudson, 2010. Print.

People:
Laura Knott. Personal MIT Museum. 22 Oct. 2013.
John Douglas Powers. MIT Museum. 7 Nov. 2013.
Anne Lilly. MIT Museum. 13 Nov. 2013.
Marcel Duchamp (1887-1968)-
One of the first kinetic sculptors, he was especially inspired by dance.

His
Bicycle Wheel
(1913) is recognized as the first modern kinetic sculpture.

Alexander Calder (1898-1976)-
A contemporary of Duchamp, created giant, primary-colored mobiles. (The term mobile is actually thought to be coined by Duchamp in reference to Calder's early work)
http://www.moma.org/collection/object.php?object_id=81631
http://www.calder.org/
Next Steps
Contact Anne Lilly
Visit Museums
Go back to MIT Museum
deCordova
MoMA
Mass MoCA
Classes and make contact with the Artists Asylum
Join a programming/ Arduino group
Keep experimenting
Product
Motion sensitive
Light sensors
Nitinol wire
One large product, multiple little products
HOW CAN I CREATE INTERACTIVE ART?
Full transcript