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Utopia

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by

Claire Beno

on 7 February 2013

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Transcript of Utopia

By: Kierstin Faw, Claire Beno, Jessica Biresch, and Megan Ebraheem Utopian Communities The Shaker Phenomenon Motive to Begin Colony Checklist Location
How many people
Goals for society
Jobs
Religion
Government
Education
Health Oneida Difference between Utopia and Dystopia Utopia: A perfect world

Dystopia: Disfunctional Utopia New Harmony Motive to start community:
"Owen believed that the best way to influence behavior was through the proper environment."- americanhistory.about.com

Successful:
"The group believed in communal living and progressive systems of education."-americanhistory.about.com
"time money"
"time stores"

Failure:
they didn't have a religion to be centered around
"...lasted less than three years, lacking strong central beliefs."-americanhistory.about.com Expression of religion
Creation of art
Allowance of demands Success Survived for more than two hundred years
More than twenty thousand Americans partially lived as a Shaker since 1774
Converted nearly four thousand Americans to Shakers by 1850
Shakers served as a touchstone for other communal movements
One small Shaker community still in existence today Failure One described people of community as dull, incapable animals
Dwindled slowly
Lacked controversial practices
Received harsh remarks from a few visitors Sources http://brbl-archive.library.yale.edu/exhibitions/utopia/utopcom.html
http://www.apstudynotes.org/us-history/topics/transcendentalism-religion-and-utopian-movements/
http://www.enotes.com/utopian-communities-reference/utopian-communities
http://media.mainememory.net/media/images/195/75/6735.JPG Motivation Success Failure John Humphrey Noyes founded this community based on the beliefs in the Putney. He was forced out of Putney in 1847 because of his group practices. -explored many different economic ventures like farming, saw milling, black smithing and silk production. - made themselves into a joint stock company called the Oneida. Ltd. to support themselves. "Finally, John Humphrey Noyes and the Oneida Perfectionists were responding, not just to the call of the West and the promise it held out, as Turner might have us believe, but just as Winthrop and the Puritans, to changing social conditions that undermined their understanding of themselves and their place in their society." had very high expectations for the community making it hard to live in http://xroads.virginia.edu/~HYPER/HNS/Cities/oneida.html Sources
http://americanhistory.about.com/od/19thcentur1/tp/Utopian-Movements.htm
http://xroads.virginia.edu/~HYPER/HNS/Cities/newharmony.html
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