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Eveline by James Joyce

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Ryan Johnson

on 24 September 2013

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Transcript of Eveline by James Joyce

Eveline by James Joyce
Eveline
Eveline is a short story written by James Joyce about a troubled young woman stuck between choosing a life of regret with her father or running away and starting a new life with the man of her dreams.
Traditional Approach
Formalistic Approach
Psychological Approach
As Sigmund Freud suggested, there are driving forces that play a role on how we interact with the world, Eveline is proof of this theory as she battles these forces in her decisions.
Feminist Approach
Eveline's fear of living as a stereotypical women pushes her to decide to leave with Frank
But leaving with Frank fulfills the stereotype of every girl wanting to be swept away by there "prince charming"
It is Eveline's realization that she is just switching between stereotypes that causes her self-paralysis at the end
Archetypal Approach
Archetypes are present in Eveline's memories and her actions as well as in other texts effectively giving evidence of common human memories.
The End
by James Joyce
"But in her new home, in a distant unknown country, it would not be like that. Then she would be married -- she, Eveline. People would treat her with respect then. She would not be treated as her mother had been."
"She was to go away with him by the night-boat to be his wife and to live with him in Buenos Ayres where he had a home waiting for her"
"He would give her life, perhaps love, too. But she wanted to live. Why should she be unhappy? She had a right to happiness."
"If I can get the heart of Dublin, I can get to the heart of all of the cities in the world"
"That was a long time ago she and her brothers and sisters were all grown up; her mother was dead, Tizzie Dunn was dead, too"
"For he was usually bad on Saturday night"
The author James Joyce's life directly correlates to the characters and events that take place in the short story Eveline.
"But in her new home, in a distant unknown country, it would not be like that. Then she would be married — she, Eveline. People would treat her with respect then. She would not be treated as her mother had been. Even now, though she was over nineteen, she sometimes felt herself in danger of her father’s violence."
"She stood up in a sudden impulse of terror. Escape! She must Escape! Frank would save her, he would give her life, perhaps love, too. she wanted to live"
"Even now, though she was over nineteen, she sometimes felt herself in danger of her fathers violence"
"One time there used to be a field there in which they used to play every evening with other people’s children."
"Her father used often to hunt them in out of the field with his blackthorn stick..."
"Her head was leaned against the window curtains and in her nostrils was the odor of dusty cretonne."
"the white of two letters in her lap grew indistinct. One was to harry; the other was to her father"
"the children of the avenue used to play together in that field. her father used to hunt them in out the field with his blackthorn stick"
"they had all gone for a picnic to the hill of howth. she remembered her father putting on her mothers bonnet to make the children laugh
"but latterly he had begun to threaten her and say what he would do to her only for her dead mother's sake."
"He rushed beyond the barrier and called to her to follow. he was shouted at to go on but he still called to her. she set her white face to him, passive, like a helpless animal. her eyes gave him no sign of love or farewell or recognition."
"Passive, Like A Helpless Animal"
Full transcript