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Declaration of Independence

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by

Angel Rollins

on 30 October 2013

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Transcript of Declaration of Independence

Declaration

of
Independence

Politicial/Social Significance
For centuries, most people lived as subjects or slaves to various monarchs (Gardner 1). Any individual enjoyment of life or property was by permission, not by right (Gardner 1). America changed that. Alone among nations, America was founded on a philosophy of individual rights (Gardner 1).

The first few paragraphs of the Declaration summarize the nitty-gritties of that philosophy. The great men who founded our nation declared that your life, liberty, property, and right to pursue happiness belong to you, not the state or anyone else (Gardner 1). In the remarkable words of Ben Franklin, they gave us, not mob rule democracy, but a republic (Gardner 1).
Literary Significance
The Declaration of Independence has great significance to the American people because it is what led our independence from King George III.

The Declaration also plays a significant role in our world today and in recent history. It is because of the words in the document that women are now treated the same as men and that all races are treated equally.

. However, without the words of one of our founding fathers Thomas Jefferson, some of the civil rights that have been passed today may never have come to light (Feldman 1). These are a few of the many reasons the Declaration of Independence is so significant to everyone.
Work Cited

Feldman, Barbara. “The Declaration of Independence”Independence Day Fun. Ed.
Barbara Feldman. 1996 – 2013
Gardner, Ken “The Declaration of Independence” www.therightsphere.com Politics July 3, 2011
Jefferson, Thomas. “The Declaration of Independence” www.history.com/
HISTORY Education. 1996-2013


Declaration Video
Thomas Jefferson
John Adams
John Hancock
Benjamin Franklin
Crispus Attucks
Historical Significance
When crowds of American colonists and British soldiers began combat against one another in April 1775, the Americans were apparently fighting only for their rights as subjects of the British crown (Jefferson 1).

The Congress formally adopted the Declaration of Independence--written mainly by Jefferson--in Philadelphia on July 4, a date now celebrated as the birth of American independence (Jefferson 1).
Full transcript