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Changing Gender Roles in 1920s Society

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on 27 March 2014

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Transcript of Changing Gender Roles in 1920s Society

Thesis
Conclusion
The 1920s brought a revolutionary change for women in regards to sexuality, physical appearance, and media. Women adopted the "flapper" appearance of short hair, short skirts, and makeup, which heightened their public appeal and portrayal. Large companies used this to their advantage by characterizing them as sexual to attract the attention of everyday consumers. Although some women were obtaining jobs, many were used primarily for their bodies and outward appearance, which caused men to continue to treat them as inferiors and further diminish their position in society.

Women experienced significant change in regards to their clothes, hair, makeup, and body in the 1920s. As many adopted the "flapper" look, people began to see them as very sexual and appealing. This caused the media to use this "new" woman to catch the public's attention. Large companies began to use them to advertise product, which attracted many. Women's appearance in media is even more common today, representing society's increasing consumerism and sexual portrayal of women.
1920s: Women in the Media
Lucky Strike
Coca-Cola
"The young, devil-may-care flapper with her short dress, rouged face, and rolled stockings symbolized the New Woman of the 1920s."
"As one girl said-- I don't particularly care to be kissed by some of the fellows I know, but I'd let them do it any time rather than think I wouldn't dare"
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