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Machiavelli and The Prince

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by

Natalie Smith

on 8 September 2016

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Transcript of Machiavelli and The Prince

Machiavelli and
The Prince

Machiavelli
Born in Florence, Italy in 1469
Lived during Italian Renaissance, a time of feuding family dynasties and warring city-states.
Falsely implicated in plot against the Medici family, and was tortured and imprisoned in 1513
Wrote
The Prince
in an attempt to win over Lorenzo de Medici

The Prince
Witty and cynical, it showed Machiavelli's understanding of Italy
Sets aside Christian values and give ruthlessly practical advice to a prince
Often maligned as a playbook for tyrants who use evil means to hold onto power
Due to the motivation behind the book, we must suspect that the book doesn't wholly represent Machiavelli's beliefs
Machiavelli's Political Philosophy
Text to Text Comparison
You will compare excerpts from Machiavelli's
The Prince
to a
New York Times
article "Why Marchiavelli Still Matters" by John T. Scott and Robert Zaretsky.
The success of a state or
nation is paramount
Whoever governs the state or nation must strive to secure...
...his or her own power and glory.
...the success of the state.
In order to do this, they cannot be bound by morality.
The end justifies the means.
Full transcript