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Attitudes Towards Slavery North and South

By: Matt Eiel, Bill Campbell, and Buddha Paul
by

Matt Eiel

on 4 December 2012

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Transcript of Attitudes Towards Slavery North and South

Slave Attitudes in the South South Regulating Slavery Slavery in the Upper South Slavery in the Lower South Initially grew tobacco
Later started growing grain and vegetables
Crops like grain and vegetables required less intensive labor and allowed slaves work under the "task system" Cotton is the main crop in the lower south
Slaves were more often ill housed, ill fed, and ill cared for
It was more profitable to keep slaves working for longer amounts of time
Since slaves were demanded to do hard labor and work for long times there were many more male slaves than female slaves Slave codes banned slaves to:
Read
Write
Testify in court against whites without a lawyer present
Go to church
Slave patrols
Authorities to make sure the slave codes were followed Owning Slaves in the South Only 50% of southern residents actually owned slaves. Plantation Owners Plantation owners and Yeomen farmers Extremely wealthy
Owned massive amounts of slaves to work their plantations
Mostly farmed cotton
Didn't use any of their money to help anybody besides themselves
They didn't use any of their money to make public schools, instead they only educated their own people Yeomen Farmers Northern Attitudes Attitudes Towards Slavery By: Matt Eiel, Anthony Paul, and
Bill Campbell Yeomen farmers were not nearly as rich as plantation owners
Unlike the plantation owners they only crop to feed their families.
They did not farm cotton.
They mostly did not own slaves.
They were uneducated due to the lack of schooling which is due to the lack of funding from the plantation owners. Most Northerners were impartial to slavery because...
They knew that America needed the products that the slaves produced but they also knew that slavery was immoral.
The pros outweighed the cons in most Northerners minds but... Abolitionists Thought Differently The second great awakening helped people realize that slavery is immoral and a sin. William Lloyd Garrison, an abolitionist published the liberator (1831) which asked for immediate and unconditional emancipation.
In 1833 Garrison and others established the American Anti-Slavery Society. He even condemned and burned the constitution as a pro slavery document. Southerners felt that slavery was a vital part of their lifestyle If the southerners did not have slaves they would not be able to produce as much product and as a result of this, would not make nearly as much money As the 19th century began many people including
people in the south felt that slavery would gradually decrease after the ban on importation of slaves in 1808 but this idea quickly went away as the growth of the cotton industry began. This along with the arguments over the Missouri compromise showed slavery would be an issue with no clear answer The Liberty party was a group of Northerners against slavery felt that political action was more practical than Garrison's moral crusade. They pledged to bring about the end of slavery by political and legal means. Black abolitionists were the most outspoken for obvious reasons against slavery. Freddy D a follower of Garrison advocated both a political and direct action to end slavery. Many other black abolitionists such as Harriet Tubman, David Ruggles and William Still helped slaves escape to Canada through the under ground railroad. Violent abolitionism became a growing problem. David walker and Henry Highland Garnet were northern blacks who advocated slaves to take action and rise up themselves in results against their masters. Nat Turner a slave in Virginia led a revolt where 55 blacks were killed. In return whites killed hundreds of blacks leading to fear of future uprisings causing an end to antislavery talk in the south. Abolitionists Thought Differently The second great awakening helped people realize that slavery is immoral and a sin. William Lloyd Garrison, an abolitionist published the liberator (1831) which asked for immediate and unconditional emancipation.
In 1833 Garrison and others established the American Anti-Slavery Society. He even condemned and burned the constitution as a pro slavery document. The Liberty party was a group of Northerners against slavery felt that political action was more practical than Garrison's moral crusade. They pledged to bring about the end of slavery by political and legal means. Black abolitionists were the most outspoken for obvious reasons against slavery. Freddy D a follower of Garrison advocated both a political and direct action to end slavery. Many other black abolitionists such as Harriet Tubman, David Ruggles and William Still helped slaves escape to Canada through the under ground railroad. Violent abolitionism became a growing problem. David walker and Henry Highland Garnet were northern blacks who advocated slaves to take action and rise up themselves in results against their masters. Nat Turner a slave in Virginia led a revolt where 55 whites were killed. In return whites killed hundreds of blacks leading to fear of future uprisings causing an end to antislavery talk in the south. Pro Slavery Northerners Many people in the North were against abolitionists.They didn't like the ruckus caused by the radicals.
They also grew up believing that what the constitution says goes and regarded its clauses on slavery as a lasting bargain.
Many Northerners also had a heavy economical stake in the south. Planters owed northern banks $300 mil and they felt if slavery ended this money would be lost.
New England Textile mills were also very important and they relied on southern plantations for their cotton. Overall Southern Attitudes Pro slavery
Needed slaves on their farms
Wanted slaves to increase their state representation. Overall Northern Attitudes As a whole they disliked slavery
Felt that although slavery may be necessary it is immoral
Didn't want the South to get representation for their slaves Multiple Choice Questions #1 Most northerners... A. Absolutely hated Slavery
B. Knew that they need slavery but also knew it was immoral
C. Loved the Idea of Slavery
D. Encouraged SOutherners to sell them slaves B. Knew that they need slaveryery but also knew it was immoral # 2 William Lloyd Garrison... A. Was A Yeomen Farmer
B. Was A Plantation Owner
C. Sparked the Idea of the immediate abolition of slavery
D Was the first slave to revolt against the slave master C. Sparked the idea of the immediate abolition of slavery! #3 Yeomen Farmers... A. Planted crops to sell to the rest of america.
B. Were very Wealthy
C. Owned lots of slaves.
D. Planted only what their families needed. D. Planted only what their families needed # 4 Liberty Party A. Were pro slavery as long as it stayed in the south
B. Wanted to end slavery by political actions
C. Were extremely violent
D. Agreed with Garrison B. Wanted to end slavery by political actions #5 Nat Turner.... A. Wanted slaves to stop actining up.
B. Was a nothern black abolitionist.
C. Owned many slaves.
D. Led a slave revolt. D. Led a slave revolt. Short Answer What were the northerners reasons for being pro slavery?
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