Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Salsa

No description
by

Sara Malik

on 4 June 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Salsa

By: Sabrina Jose & Sara Malik
Spanish - Period 6
Due: May 30, 2013 SALSA Origin Meaning of Salsa Salsa Dance (Puerto Rican) History of Salsa Many argue that Salsa first began around the 1920-50s since Cuban music started to spread. The French who initially fled from Haiti brought the country dance of England/France to Cuba. The dance began to mix with African rumbas and drumbeats. This type of syncretism occurred in other places like the Dominican Republic, Colombia, and Puerto Rico. Around the time of World War II, the music then traveled to Mexico City and New York. Salsa could mean "sauce" in Spanish, but in this case, Salsa is a ballroom dance performed by a couple to music, faster with the accent on the first beat instead of the second beat with each measure. The term was originally created in New York, which occurred to a Cuban composer after eating food that lacked Cuban spices. Salsa originated from Cuba. Influential During the 1940s and 1950s, Cuban musicians had a huge influence on the New York music scene. Once Fidel, the prime minister of Cuba, came to power, diplomatic relations fell apart between Cuba, and the United States. Cuban musicians could no longer travel to the United States. The Puerto Rican and New Yorkers of Puerto Rican descent musicians took on New York single handed. New York, Miami, and Los Angeles were the most popular cities for Salsa. Influences of Salsa Salsa, such as the L.A style, is influenced by the Swing, Tango, and Latin ballroom dances. Because of high concentrations of Puerto Ricans in New York, the Salsa dance is strongly Puerto Rican influenced with an emphasis on fast footwork. The tricks and dips were from the West Coast Swing influence. Styles/Variations
Cuban Style (does not have many fast spins)
Colombian Style (longer pause between beats)
Miami Style (more circular than linear; requires flexible follower)
New York Style (smooth and controlled movements)
L.A. Style (more flips and drops)
Puerto Rican Style (opposite of New York style; more faster)
Salsa Shines (each dancer has the opportunity to freestyle) Steps to Salsa Beat 1: step forward with your left foot while bringing your weight to your left foot
Beat 2: replace your right foot where it was, while bringing your weight to your right foot
Beat 3: bring your left foot next to your right foot
Beat 4: continue moving through the step you took on beat 3 slowly so the movement never stops (you don't take a "new" step on this beat)
Beat 5: step with your right foot backwards while bringing your weight to your right foot
Beat 6: replace your left foot where it was, while bringing your weight to your left foot
Beat 7: bring your right foot next to your left foot
Beat 8: keep moving through the step you took on beat 7, slowly so the movement is fluid and never stops (you don't take a "new" step on this beat)
Repeat The Salsa dresses are made to be bold and beautiful, but they are very comfortable to wear. They tend to be made out of nylon so when people start to sweat, they'll dry faster. Women have specific Salsa dresses that are sold in stores along with Salsa skirts. For men, its more of a casual wear, but they tend to dress well. They normally wear khaki or dress pants with a polo, buttoned down, or a nice t-shirt. Outfits Instruments
piano
bongos
conga
timbales
trumpet
trombone
claves
cowbell
maracas
güiro
double bass/bass guitar
flute
saxophone
vibraphone
violin Dance Lessons Every Saturday: 2725 W Division, Chicago, IL Phone #: 773-395-8693
5246 N. Elston Avenue, CHICAGO, IL 60630 Phone #: 773-635-3000
Email: info@mayihavethisdance.com
1239 W Lake St, Chicago, IL
Phone #: 773-888-2939
7350 N Milwaukee Ave, Niles, IL
Phone #: 847-600-0088 Born Romantic(2000) Dance with me(1998) Movies/Films/Documentaries
Featuring Salsa Salsa (1998) Salsa y Amor(2000) Important Figures Marco Antonio Muñiz (Marc Anthony)
He's an American actor, but is a top selling tropical Salsa of all time. He's best known for his Salsa numbers and ballads. Ernesto Antonio "Tito" Puente
He was a Latin jazz and Salsa musician and composer. He was known as the Musical Pope due to how much he had contributed to the musical world. Tito Puente: Ran Kan Kan Ran kan kan kan, kan kan
Pero suenan, suenan los timbales
Ran kan kan kan, kan kan
Tito, Tito suename los timbales

Ran kan kan kan, kan kan
Goza, goza, goza con los timbales
Ran kan kan kan, kan kan
Pero suenan, suenan los timbales

Ran kan kan kan, kan kan
Ah como, como suenan los timbales
Ran kan kan kan, kan kan
Tito ponme a gozar con los timbales

Ran kan kan kan, kan kan
Ay como suenan, suenan oye negran los timbales
Ran kan kan kan, kan kan
Tito Puente ponme a gozar sabrosan con tus timbales English Translations Ran can can can can can
But they sound, the drums sound
Ran can can can can can
Tito, Tito suename timbales

Ran can can can can can
Enjoy, enjoy, enjoys timbales
Ran can can can can can
But they sound, the drums sound

Ran can can can can can
Ah like, sound like the drums
Ran can can can can can
Tito put me to enjoy the timbales

Ran can can can can can
Oh how they sound, hear sound black toms Collage Chronological Order 1933: Salsa was "born".
1960: The Beginnings of Commercial Salsa
1974: Salsa Popularized
1976: Salsa Explosion
Full transcript