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The Chrysalids Quotes

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Justin Kelly

on 7 April 2011

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Transcript of The Chrysalids Quotes

The Chrysalids Quotes Pg. 13 David The Definition of Man recited itself in my head: '. . . and each leg shall be jointed twice and have one foot, and each foot five toes, and each toe shall end with a flat nail....' And so on, until finally: 'And any creature that shall seem to be human, but is not formed thus is not human. It is neither man nor woman. It is a blasphemy against the true Image of God, and hateful in the sight of God.' Pg. 13 David and Sophie Mom Because she has six toes?' I asked.
'Yes. That's what nobody but us must ever know. It must be a secret between us,' she repeated, driving it home. 'You'll promise, David?'
'I'll promise. I can swear, if you like,' I offered.
'The promise is enough,' she told me. Pg. 33 David I dropped what I was doing, and ran across to see. It was a bit disappointing at first sight. The tales about the Fringes had led me to expect creatures with two heads, or fur all over, or half a dozen arms and legs. Instead, they seemed at first glance to be just two ordinary men with beards -- though unusually dirty, and with very ragged clothes. One of them was a short man with fair hair which was tufted as though he had trimmed it with a knife. But when I looked at the other I had a shock which brought me up dumbfounded, and staring at him. I was so jolted I just went on staring at him, for, put him in decent clothes, tidy up his beard, and he'd be the image of my father. . . . Pg. 40 Pg. 40 David or Author The penance of Tribulation that had been put upon the world must be worked out, the long climb faithfully retraced, and, at last, if the temptations by the way were resisted, there would be the reward of forgiveness -- the restoration of the Golden Age. Pg. 57 David or Author The penance of Tribulation that had been put upon the world must be worked out, the long climb faithfully retraced, and, at last, if the temptations by the way were resisted, there would be the reward of forgiveness -- the restoration of the Golden Age. Pg. 64 Uncle Axel I'm telling you,' he went on,' that a lot of people saying that a thing is so, doesn't prove it is so. I'm telling you that nobody, nobody really knows what is the true image. They all think they know -- just as we think we know, but, for all we can prove, the Old People themselves may not have been the true image.' He turned, and looked long and steadily at me again.
' So,' he said, 'how am I, and how is anyone to be sure that this "difference" that you and Rosalind have does not make you something nearer to the true image than other people are? Perhaps the Old People were the image: very well then, one of the things they say about them is that they could talk to one another over long distances. Now we can't do that -- but you and Rosalind can. Just think that over, Davie. You two may be nearer to the image than we are,'
Pg. 86 David In the last few years we had learnt more of the people round us, and the way they felt. What had seemed, five or six years ago, a kind of rather disquieting game had grown grimmer as we understood more about it. Essentially, it had not changed. Still our whole consideration if we were to survive must be to keep our true selves hidden; to walk, talk, and live indistinguishably from other people. We had a gift, a sense which, Michael complained bitterly, should have been a blessing, but was little better than a curse. The stupidest norm was happier; he could feel that he belonged. We did not, and because we did not, we had no positive -- we were condemned to negatives, to not revealing ourselves, to not speaking when we would, to not using what we knew, to not being found out -- to a life of perpetual deception, concealment, and lying. The prospect of continued negativeness stretching out ahead chafed him more than it did the rest of us. His imagination took him further, giving him a clearer vision of what such frustrations were going to mean, but it was no better at suggesting an alternative than ours were. As far as I was concerned a firm grasp of the negative in the cause of survival had been quite enough to occupy me; I was only just beginning to perceive the vacancy left by the absent positive. It was chiefly my appreciation of danger that had sharpened as I grew up. Pg. 196 Zealand Women 'In loyalty to their kind they cannot tolerate our rise; in loyalty to our kind, we cannot tolerate their obstruction. Pg. 196 Zealand Women The essential quality of life is living; the essential quality of living is change; change is evolution: and we are part of it.
' The static, the enemy of change, is the enemy of life, and therefore our implacable enemy. Pg. 199 David It was just as I had seen it in my dreams. A brighter sun than Waknuk ever knew poured down upon the wide blue bay where the lines of white-topped breakers crawled slowly to the beach. Small boats, some with colored sails, and some with none, were making for the harbor already dotted with craft. Clustered along the shore, and thinning as it stretched back towards the hills, lay the city with its white houses embedded among green parks and gardens. I could even make out the tiny vehicles sliding along the wide, tree-bordered avenues. A little inland, beside a square of green, a bright light was blinking from a tower and a fish-shaped machine was floating to the ground. This quote is significant because it shows how having a deviation is a real problem in Waknuk and it gives the reader a sense of how important it is that its kept secret if someone has one. The promise and almost swearing on it shows that David is committed to hiding a very dark secret that if told would end the life Sophie’s family is living there. This quote is significant because it sums up the “problems” that the people of Waknuk are against. They burn all Offenses and shun all Blasphemies under the name of God. This quote is important because David recites The Definition of Man to realize that Sophie is a Blasphemy, and to realize that he must keep a very important secret to himself if he has any respect for Sophie and her family. Pg. 33 David I dropped what I was doing, and ran across to see. It was a bit disappointing at first sight. The tales about the Fringes had led me to expect creatures with two heads, or fur all over, or half a dozen arms and legs. Instead, they seemed at first glance to be just two ordinary men with beards -- though unusually dirty, and with very ragged clothes. One of them was a short man with fair hair which was tufted as though he had trimmed it with a knife. But when I looked at the other I had a shock which brought me up dumbfounded, and staring at him. I was so jolted I just went on staring at him, for, put him in decent clothes, tidy up his beard, and he'd be the image of my father. . . This quotes is significant because in a way it gives insight into what happens latter in the book and also explains an important feature to the plot of this book. Fringes people are Blasphemies who have been shunned from normal society and David and his friends technically being Blasphemies are part of this group. This quote explains how being part of this group is not something you would want to be in. Plus this quote also starts the sub conflict between Joseph and his brother Spider-man, the leader of the Fringes. This quote is significant because it states what the goals are for the Waknuk society. They want to grow into a strong society as it was before tribulation, but the only way they believe they can make it there is by staying true by not allowing deviations to live. So all the Offenses, Blasphemies and deviations have to be burned or shunned in order for Waknuk to regain the Golden Age. This quotes is significant because Uncle Axel is informing David on which paths he can take to solve his dilemma. He can either run away or stick it out until he’s older. This is an important quote because without Uncle Axels knowledge and guidance, David would have ran away much earlier and the story would have been much different, because he would not have known about Petra. This quote also has a bit of foreshadowing for what is going to happen latter in the book. The reader now knows that David is going to stay in Waknuk for the time being. This quote is significant because it shows how the religion that Waknuk has may or may not me true. They may not be the true image, maybe David and his friends are? It puts a question mark to the “Image of God” and that is an important part of this story because latter David realizes that there is no true way or real image of god. It doesn’t matter what you look like, as a society, someway or the another, it’s possible to reach the status of the Golden Age, as he sees through Zealand. This quote is significant because it sums up the hardships that David and his group go through in their lives. It shows how much fear they are in while going about their normal days. It also shows how much the group has adapted to their problems and the progress they have made in hiding it. But trying to hid it is extremely hard as you see latter on in the book... This is an important quote because it shows how one society can view another in a destructive way. The Zealand people believe they are the superior race because of their technology. They believe that the Labrador people need to be wiped out because they are an obstruction in the Zealand's growth. This quote shows how conflict and war can arise from simple, yet complicated matters. This quote is significant because it states that in order to live life, you must adapt, evolve, and change with it. The Waknuk people are not adapting, evolving, and changing as a society so the Zealand women is bluntly saying that they are he enemies because they are not living life like they should be. With this idea, she had the “rights” to kill all of the people fighting when they went to rescue David, Rosalind, and Petra. This quote is very significant because it wraps up the mystery that David has had through the whole book from page one. The dreams he would have of a magical city were coming true before his eyes. I believe in a way that at the start when he was having those dreams, he was bound to find that city by the end of the book. At least that’s what I thought so him finding the city is very important because his goals have been reached. By Justin Kelly
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