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Copy of Julius Caesar: Shakespeare Unit

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Jason Borowicz

on 9 August 2013

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Transcript of Copy of Julius Caesar: Shakespeare Unit

Act 1
Act II
Act III
Act IV
Act V
Act I.i
Act I.ii
Act I.iii
Act II.iii
Act II.i
Act II.ii
Act II.iv
Are Brutus, Cassius, and Cascus justified in their revolt?
Support your opinion with evidence from the text. If you can, include a metaphor or weave current events in to make your ideas more engaging and relevant.
Timed Essay
Act III.iii
Act III.ii
Act III.i
Analysis - Persuasion
You will get them back next class.

Take this time to
prepare a new QFR Chart for Act V.
Act IV.i
Timed Essay
Act IV.ii
Act IV.iii
Act V.i
Act V.iv
At this time, please create a new QFR chart for Act II.
Act V.iii
Act V.ii
Act V.v
Dramatis personae
Flavius
First Commoner
Marullus
Second Commoner
Flavius and Marullus, two judges, notice a bunch of people partying in the streets during the feast of Lupercal. They decide to investigate the cause of this sudden celebration.
The next video gives us an idea of why...
Quickwrite
What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know?
Quickwrite
What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know?
Quickwrite
What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know?
Which character is the most important here? What makes that character the most important?
Quickwrite
What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know?
Quickwrite
Quickwrite
What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know?
Quickwrite
What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know?
Quickwrite
What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know?
What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know?
Quickwrite
Quickwrite
What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know?
Quickwrite
What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know?
Quickwrite
What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know?
What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know?
Quickwrite
What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know?
Quickwrite
What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know?
Quickwrite
What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know?
Quickwrite
What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know?
Quickwrite
We will read and discuss.
We will summarize and explore gist.
We will discuss the technical complexities of the task of reading Shakespeare.
We will interpret and analyze.
We will write sentences.
We will write analyses.
Throughout all of this, we will prepare for the IGSCE
Our Process
Questions Facts Reactions
What do Flavius and Murullus think of the crowd? How do you know this?
Analysis Quickwrite
Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class.
You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene.
Dramatis personae
Caesar
Casca
Calpurnia
Antony
Soothsayer
Brutus
Cassius
coronet
a crown made out of olive branches, signifying victory and excellence in leadership
a fanfare of many trumpets
flourish
sennet
the sound of one trumpet
falling sickness
an old-fashioned term for epilepsy or an epileptic siezure
soliloquy
when one character stands alone on stage and reveals his/her inner thoughts directly to the audience.
Caesar speaks to his wife and a soothsayer.

Cassius and Casca attempt to convince Brutus that Caesar is growing more dangerous by the day.

Cassius reveals his plot against Caesar.
motivation
A character’s motivation is the driving force behind his or her thoughts, feelings, and actions. Understanding what motivates a character is often the key to understanding an entire story.
Look for what Cassius says to Brutus in Act 1.2 and consider what his motive is for saying what he says. Use the following chart to help you.
What Cassius Says / Does
Possible Motive
for This Behavior
exeunt
a stage direction that is used to indicate when two or more characters leave the stage at the same time.
You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene.
Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class.
Dramatis personae
Casca
Cicero
Cassius
Cinna
During a nasty storm, a few of the conspirators meet and reveal how their plot to overthrow Caesar are coming along. They are confident, but they know they need to convince Brutus to join them if they are to be successful.
IGSCE Review
What is the effect of setting this scene in the middle of a nasty storm?
a. it reminds audiences that it is evening
b. it symbolizes evil and change
c. it shows how bad weather was in Rome
d. it is totally irrelevant
In this sentence, the word "dagger" is used as:

a) a subject
b) an object
c) as both a modifier and a subject
d) as both a modifier and an object
IGSCE Review
"I know where I will wear this dagger then."
IGSCE Review
What word best describes the mood of this scene?
a) celebratory
b) joyous
c) depressed
d) ominous
Which of these features most clearly identifies "Julius Caesar" as a play?
IGSCE Review
a) its use of iambic pentameter
b) its use of metaphors and simile
c) its use of stage directions
d) its use of regular meter
IGSCE Review
In this sentence, the word "bondage" means:
a) disaster
b) financial burden
c) sickness
d) political opression
"Cassius from bondage will deliver Cassius:"
Analysis Quickwrite
Why do the conspirators want to make sure that Brutus is on their side?
Major Characters
Casca
Cassius
Caesar
Brutus
Antony
Calpurnia
The ringleader of the conspiracy against Caesar.
Has a "sour fashion," and is part of the conspiracy.
Caesar's best friend. "At war with himself." More muscle than brains.
Emperor of Rome... but is he really all that great?
Caesar's wife. She's superstitious, and doesn't have any kids.
Caesar's loyal ally. He is unassuming and brilliant.
Who is the most important character in the play so far? Explain your answer.
Warm up
Brutus
Lucius
Cassius
Decius
Cinna
Casca
Metellus
Trebonius
Portia
Caius
Dramatis personae
Brutus wrestles with his conscience over whether or not to join in the conspiracy against Caesar.

The conspirators arrive at Brutus' house, and Brutus' wife, Portia, notices that her husband is acting strangely.
Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class.
You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene.
Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class.
You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene.
What is the main purpose of the information in this passage?

a. it tells readers that the visitors are ugly
b. it suggests that the visitors are concealing themselves
c. it shows that the visitors are proud to be seen
d. it reminds audiences that the visitors are strangers
No, sir; their hats are pluck'd about their ears,
And half their faces buried in their cloaks,
That by no means I may discover them
By any mark of favour.
IGCSE Review
They are the faction. O conspiracy,
Shamest thou to show thy dangerous brow by night,
When evils are most free? O, then by day
Where wilt thou find a cavern dark enough
To mask thy monstrous visage?
IGCSE Review
In this passage, the word "visage" most nearly means:

a. intentions
b. wants
c. expressions
d. weapons
IGCSE Review
And for Mark Antony, think not of him;
For he can do no more than Caesar's arm
When Caesar's head is off.
This is a classic example of:

a. metaphor
b. simile
c. paradox
d. rhyme
Why doesn’t Brutus want to kill Marc Antony? What does this tell us about Brutus? Explain your answer in a well developed short answer. (1-2 paragraphs)
Analysis
Dramatis personae
Caesar
Calpurnia
Servant
Decius
Brutus
Antony
Publius
Trebonius
Over at Caesar's house, Caesar and Calpurnia haven't slept much due to the storm. Calpurnia is worried, and Caesar isn't sure if he's going to head to the capitol or not.
Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class.
You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene.
"The things that threatened me ne’er looked but on my back. When they shall see the face of Caesar, they are vanished.”
This passage is an example of:
a. Simile
b. Oxymoron
c. Paradox
d. Personification
To what does the word “they” refer?
A. Caesar’s face
B. Caesar’s back
C. The things that threaten Caesar
D. Cassius and Brutus
"The things that threatened me ne’er looked but on my back. When they shall see the face of Caesar, they are vanished.”
'Caesar, beware of Brutus; take heed of Cassius;
come not near Casca; have an eye to Cinna, trust not
Trebonius: mark well Metellus Cimber: Decius Brutus
loves thee not: thou hast wronged Caius Ligarius.
There is but one mind in all these men, and it is
bent against Caesar. If thou beest not immortal,
look about you: security gives way to conspiracy.
The mighty gods defend thee! Thy lover,
'ARTEMIDORUS.'
Here will I stand till Caesar pass along,
And as a suitor will I give him this.
My heart laments that virtue cannot live
Out of the teeth of emulation.
If thou read this, O Caesar, thou mayst live;
If not, the Fates with traitors do contrive.
Dramatis Personae
Portia
Lucius
Soothsayer
IGCSE Review
Judging from this passage, Caesar would most likely be described as:
a. ignorant
b. foolish
c. arrogant
d. dangerous
"The things that threatened me ne’er looked but on my back. When they shall see the face of Caesar, they are vanished.”
Which of the following choices is NOT an indication of Caesar's arrogance?
a. Caesar speaks of himself in the third person.

b. Caesar refuses to accept a crown.

c. Caesar's wife refers to him as "lord," and he does not take her advice.

d. Caesar compares himself to a lion.
a. angry
b. reminder
c. suspenseful
d. perplexing
What modifier best describes the mood of this scene?
a. it adds comic relief
b. it makes the play a tragedy
c. it heightens audience anxiety
d. it wastes time
What is the effect of including a series of short scenes in the play at this time?
Analysis Quickwrite
What information do we, as readers, now know that certain characters may not yet know?
Dramatic Irony
Occurs when the audience (or readers) know more information than a certain character.
Do you believe Caesar will read Artemidorus' letter in time or not? Defend your answer!
Analysis Quickwrite
Analysis Quickwrite
Who do you think made the stronger argument - Portia or Calpurnia? Defend your answer!
Warm-Up
Imagine or remember a time in your life when someone hurt, deceived, or betrayed you.

Now is YOUR chance to get back at that person!

Write a quick sentence that starts with these words.
"This is for the time(s)..."
It is in the early hours on the morning of March 15, 44 B.C.
In spite of repeated warnings of danger, Julius Caesar is headed to the Roman Senate.
Unbeknownst to Caesar, a conspiracy of senators - lead by his own best friend, Brutus - is waiting there to betray him.
IGCSE Review
What is the mood of this Act as it opens?
a. angry
b. suspenseful
c. quiet
d. secret
Dramatis personae
Caesar
Soothsayer
Artemidorus
Decius
Publius
Cassius
Popilius
Casca
Brutus
Cinna
Metellus
Trebonius
Servant
Antony
You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene.
Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class.
Yet, stay awhile;
Thou shalt not back till I have borne this corse
Into the market-place: there shall I try
In my oration, how the people take
The cruel issue of these bloody men;
HSA Review
The main idea of Antony's lines here is:
a) that he will stay with Caesar's body
b) that he will head to the market place
c) that the conspirators are bloody
d) that he will give a persuasive speech
a) rage, consolation
b) sorrow, sadness
c) remorse, revenge
d) depression, joy
Review
The tone of Antony's soliloquy (III.i.254-274) shifts from one of ______ to one of ______:
“Blood and destruction shall be so in use that mothers shall but smile when they behold their infants quartered with the hands of war…”

Which word would the playwright most likely use to describe Marc Antony as he speaks these lines?

a) Cunning
b) Vengeful
c) Angry
d) Bloodthirsty
Review
First Citizen
Second Citizen
Third Citizen
Fourth Citizen
Brutus
Antony
Servant
Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class.
Dramatis personae
You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene.
The movie "Kill Bill" tells the story of a woman who is out for blood. She will stop at nothing to get her revenge.
Based on the evidence in III.ii, which of these characters is most similar to "Kill Bill?"
a) Brutus
b) The Citizens
c) Antony
d) Octavius
Pay attention to how Brutus and Antony work their audience. You are about to experience some of the most famous lines in literary history.
What word would the playwright most likely use to describe Brutus?

What phrase best describes Antony?

What is the most challenging problem faced by Antony as he speaks to the crowd?

Which word best describes Antony’s attitude toward the crowd?
Which of these best describes the mood changes of the citizens during this scene?

a) From frightened to angry.
b) From concerned to accepting.
c) From grateful to vengeful.
d) From angry to frightened.
Review
Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class.
You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene.
Cinna
First Citizen
Second Citizen
Third Citizen
Fourth Citizen
Dramatis personae
Which of these themes from Julius Caesar best explains the behavior of the crowd in III.iii.?

a) Caesar was unjustly murdered.
b) The crowd is easily swayed.
c) A crowd can be incited to violence.
d) Brutus and Cassius will pay for their wrongdoings.
Review
What METHODS OF PERSUASION did Brutus use when speaking to the crowd?
Logos
Ethos
Pathos
appeal to logical reason
appeal to credibility
appeal to emotion
What METHODS OF PERSUASION did Antony use when speaking to the crowd?
Combine these sentences:

The crowd mistook Cinna for one of the conspirators.
Antony's speech worked the crowd into a frenzy.
Cinna was a poet
a) The frenzied crowd mistook Cinna, a poet, for one of the conspirators.

b) When Antony will work the crowd into a frenzy, they will mistake Cinna the poet for Cinna the conspirator.

c) After Antony's speech worked the crowd into a frenzy, the crowd mistook Cinna, a poet, for the conspirator of the same name.

d) Cinna was a poet whom the crowd mistook for one of the conspirators, and that was because Antony, who gave a speech, frenzied them.
Which of these statements best expresses a theme of Julius Caesar? (So far)

a) Manipulation can be accomplished in a variety of ways.
b) Cassius is an expert manipulator.
c) Absolute power is a dangerous thing.
d) Leaders become more dangerous when they become too powerful.
Jennifer is researching Marc Antony’s military career in preparation for writing a research paper. Which of these activities is most likely to help her collect information?

a) Annotating texts with notes.
b)Reading several different texts.
c) Keeping a chart of interesting facts from each source.
d) Discussing her findings with other students.
Review
Review
Antony
Lepidus
Octavius
Dramatis personae
LEPIDUS
Upon condition Publius shall not live,
Who is your sister's son, Mark Antony.

ANTONY
He shall not live; look, with a spot I damn him.

In this passage, the word "sister's" is acting as:

a) a subject
b) a modifier
c) an object
d) a conjunction
Review
Which of these statements best expresses a theme of Julius Caesar? (So far)

a) Trusting a fellow leader can be difficult.
b) Antony is an expert manipulator.
c) Absolute power is a dangerous thing.
d) Leaders' attitudes may change when they become more powerful.
Review
LEPIDUS
Upon condition Publius shall not live,
Who is your sister's son, Mark Antony.

ANTONY
He shall not live; look, with a spot I damn him.

In this passage, the word "spot" is acting as:

a) a subject
b) a modifier
c) an object
d) a conjunction
Review
Review
LEPIDUS
Upon condition Publius shall not live,
Who is your sister's son, Mark Antony.

ANTONY
He shall not live; look, with a spot I damn him.

Based on this passage, what word would the playwrite most likely use to describe Antony?

a) calculating
b) merciless
c) vengeful
d) wild
You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene.
Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class.
Analysis Quickwrite
What does Mark Antony think of Lepidus? How do you know?
Dramatis personae
Brutus
Lucillius
Pindarus
Cassius
1st Soldier
2nd Soldier
3rd Soldier
After reading Julius Caesar, students were asked to write about politics in modern America. Pedro decided to write about presidential debates. Which of these would most likely contain useful information about Pedro's essay topic?

a) Internet blogs about political ideals.
b) A textbook about early American settlements and the development of democracy.
c) A local news network’s web page.
d) A dictionary.
Review
Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class.
You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene.
Dramatis personae
Lucius
Ghost
Varro
Claudius
Cassius
Brutus
Messala
Poet
You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene.
Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class.
You have condemn'd and noted Lucius Pella
For taking bribes here of the Sardians

In this passage, the word "bribes" is acting as:

a) a subject
b) a modifier
c) an object
d) a conjunction
Review
I had rather be a dog, and bay the moon,
Than such a Roman

In this passage, the word "bay" is acting as:

a) a verb
b) a modifier
c) an object
d) a subject
Review
Go show your slaves how choleric you are,
And make your bondmen tremble. Must I budge?
Must I observe you? must I stand and crouch
Under your testy humour?

In this passage, the word "testy" is acting as:

a) a verb
b) a modifier
c) an object
d) a subject
Review
Review
For Cassius is aweary of the world;
Hated by one he loves; braved by his brother;
Cheque'd like a bondman

In this passage, the word "aweary" modifies:

a) bondman
b) brother
c) world
d) Cassius
Art thou some god, some angel, or some devil,
That makest my blood cold and my hair to stare?

The subject of this sentence is...

a) god
b) angel
c) thou
d) devil
Review
Cassius
Brutus
Lucillius
Messala
Octavius
Antony
Messenger
Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through Act V as a class.
Dramatis personae
You will need any mix-and-match combination of TWENTY FIVE items by the end of this act.
MESSENGER

Prepare you, generals:
The enemy comes on in gallant show;
Their bloody sign of battle is hung out,
And something to be done immediately.

What is the tone of this passage?

a) casual
b) urgent
c) ironic
d) fearsome
Review
But this same day
Must end that work the ides of March begun;
And whether we shall meet again I know not.
Therefore our everlasting farewell take:
For ever, and for ever, farewell, Cassius!
If we do meet again, why, we shall smile;
If not, why then, this parting was well made.

What is the tone of this passage?

a) friendly
b) wondering
c) serious
d) depressed
Review
Review
Review
OCTAVIUS:

Look;
I draw a sword against conspirators;
When think you that the sword goes up again?

What is the subject of the first sentence?

a) Look
b) I
c) sword
d) conspirators
CASSIUS

Why, now, blow wind, swell billow and swim bark!
The storm is up, and all is on the hazard.

The word "swell" is used here as a(n):

a) modifier
b) noun
c) verb
d) pronoun
OCTAVIUS:

Look;
I draw a sword against conspirators;
When think you that the sword goes up again?

What is the subject of the second sentence?

a) when
b) think
c) sword
d) you
Review
Alarum. Enter BRUTUS and MESSALA

BRUTUS
Ride, ride, Messala, ride, and give these bills
Unto the legions on the other side.

[Loud alarum]

Let them set on at once; for I perceive
But cold demeanor in Octavius' wing,
And sudden push gives them the overthrow.
Ride, ride, Messala: let them all come down.

[Exeunt]
Review
What is the effect of including a series of short scenes in the play at this time?
a. it adds comic relief
b. it makes the play a tragedy
c. it heightens audience anxiety
d. it wastes time
Review
What is the tone of Brutus' instructions in this scene?

a) angry
b) fearful
c) confident
d) depressed
Ride, ride, Messala, ride, and give these bills
Unto the legions on the other side.

What word is the subject of this sentence?

a) Ride
b) Messala
c) bills
d) legions
Review
Dramatis personae
Messala
Brutus
Cato
Cassius
Titinius
Pindarus
Review
Fly further off, my lord, fly further off;
Mark Antony is in your tents, my lord
Fly, therefore, noble Cassius, fly far off.

The subject of this sentence is:

a) Mark Antony
b) my lord
c) tents
d) Cassius
Fly further off, my lord, fly further off;
Mark Antony is in your tents, my lord
Fly, therefore, noble Cassius, fly far off.

Which of these words acts as a modifier?

a) off
b) lord
c) is
d) noble
Review
Fly further off, my lord, fly further off;
Mark Antony is in your tents, my lord
Fly, therefore, noble Cassius, fly far off.

The phrase "fly further off" most nearly means:

a) let's go for a ride
b) take a flight
c) get out of here
d) kill yourself
Review
Which choice presents the events in the proper cronological order as they appeared in the play?

a) Cassius thought Titinius was dead, Cassius killed himself, Titinius killed himself

b) Titinius killed himself, Cassius thought Titinius was dead, Cassius killed himself

c) Cassius thought Titinius was dead, Titinius killed himself, Cassius killed himself

d) Titinius killed himself, Cassius killed himself, Cassius thought Titinius was dead
Review
Review
This day I breathed first: time is come round,
And where I did begin, there shall I end;
My life is run his compass.

What is Cassius' tone in these lines?

a) sadness
b) acceptance
c) anger
d) optimism
Literary Analysis
Why are all of these people killing themselves? Are their decisions cowardly or admirable?
Defend your answer in a BCR of 5-8 sentences.
Cato
Brutus
Lucilius
Dramatis personae
First Soldier
Second Soldier
Antony
Review
What fellow doth not? Who will go with me?
I will proclaim my name about the field:
I am the son of Marcus Cato, ho!
A foe to tyrants, and my country's friend;
I am the son of Marcus Cato, ho!

What is the tone of this passage?

a) recklessness
b) nervousness
c) anger
d) defiance
LUCILIUS

Only I yield to die:
There is so much that thou wilt kill me straight;
[Offering money]
Kill Brutus, and be honor'd in his death.

Lucilius' actions in this passage could best be described as:

a) cowardly b) deceptive
c) curious d) ambitious
Review
Review
We must not. A noble prisoner!

In this passage, the word "noble" is used as a(n):

a) article

b) subject

c) modifier

d) preposition
O young and noble Cato, art thou down?
Why, now thou diest as bravely as Titinius;
And mayst be honour'd, being Cato's son.

In the first sentence, the word "art" is used as:

a) a modifier
b) a noun
c) a verb
d) a subject
Review
Review
Review
I dare assure thee that no enemy
Shall ever take alive the noble Brutus

What is the tone of this passage?

a) cockiness
b) confidence
c) frustration
d) doubt
This is not Brutus, friend; but, I assure you,
A prize no less in worth: keep this man safe;
Give him all kindness:

In this passage, the word "kindness" most nearly means:

a) gifts
b) friendliness
c) hospitality
d) personability
Review
Review
Go on,
And see whether Brutus be alive or dead;
And bring us word unto Octavius' tent
How every thing is chanced

In this passage, the word "chanced" most nearly means:

a) transpired
b) fortune
c) opportunity
d) luckiness
I dare assure thee that no enemy
Shall ever take alive the noble Brutus

In this passage, the word "ever" modifies:

a) alive
b) take
c) shall
d) noble
Review
What is the mood of Brutus' army in this scene?

a) victory
b) valliance
c) violence
d) virtue
Review
This is not Brutus, friend; but, I assure you,
A prize no less in worth

In this passage, the word "a prize" modifies:

a) This

b) Brutus

c) friend

d) you
Review
Juging from Lucilius' description of Brutus in this scene, Brutus can best be described as being:

a) conflicted

b) bloodthirsty

c) resolved

d) amazed
Review
Antony's motives for keeping Lucilius as a hostage would most likely be described as:

a) compassionate
b) concerned
c) calculated
d) confrontational
Dramatis personae
Strato
Octavius
Messala
Antony
Brutus
Clitus
Dardanius
Voluminus
Lucilius
The ghost of Caesar hath appear'd to me
Two several times by night; at Sardis once,
And, this last night, here in Philippi fields

What is the subject of this sentence?

a) ghost
b) Caesar
c) me
d) Sardis
What is the mood of Brutus' army in this scene?

a) determination
b) dejection
c) delay
d) desecration
Review
Review
Come, poor remains of friends, rest on this rock.

What is the effect of Brutus calling his army a "poor remains of friends?"

a) it reminds audiences that they have no money
b) it reiterates that the army has been defeated
c) it underscores the division in the army
d) it confirms Brutus' mistrust of his allies
Review
Nay, I am sure it is, Volumnius.
Thou seest the world, Volumnius, how it goes;
Our enemies have beat us to the pit:
It is more worthy to leap in ourselves,
Than tarry till they push us.

In this passage, the word "tarry" most nearly means:

a) delay b) fight
c) argue d) dig
This was the noblest Roman of them all:
All the conspirators save only he
Did that they did in envy of great Caesar;


In this passage, the word "save" most nearly means:
a) rescue
b) protect
c) shield
d) except
BRUTUS
Come hither, good Volumnius; list a word.

VOLUMNIUS
What says my lord?

In this passage, the phrase "list a word" most nearly means:

a) take note
b) write down
c) pay attention
d) calm yourself
Review
Countrymen,
My heart doth joy that yet in all my life
I found no man but he was true to me.

This passage is a classic example of:

a) paradox
b) simile
c) dramatic irony
d) tragedy
Review
Review
Review
Review
Review
Review
BRUTUS
Sit thee down, Clitus: slaying is the word;
It is a deed in fashion. Hark thee, Clitus.
[Whispers]

CLITUS
What, I, my lord? No, not for all the world.

What is the tone of Clitus' reaction here?

a) unhappy b) embittered
c) confused d) disbelieving
Review
Review
BRUTUS
Hold thou my sword-hilts, whilst I run on it.

VOLUMNIUS
That's not an office for a friend, my lord.


In this passage, the word "office" most nearly means:

a) workplace b) cubicle
c) job d) rank
I shall have glory by this losing day
More than Octavius and Mark Antony
By this vile conquest shall attain unto.

In this passage, the word "glory" acts as a(n):

a) subject
b) object
c) modifier
d) appositive
Now is that noble vessel full of grief,
That it runs over even at his eyes.

This passage is a clear example of:

a) a paradox
b) a metaphor
c) a simile
d) an onomatopoeia
Nay, I am sure it is, Volumnius.
Thou seest the world, Volumnius, how it goes;
Our enemies have beat us to the pit:
It is more worthy to leap in ourselves,
Than tarry till they push us.

Brutus' tone in this passage is one of:

a) reluctance b) resignation
c) recalcitrance d) revelry
Timed Essay
paradox
a statement or proposition that seems self-contradictory or absurd but in reality expresses a possible truth.
A brief, usually indirect reference to a person, place, or event--real or fictional.
allusion
Open-note Quiz
1. In what year was Shakespeare born?
2. In what town was Shakespeare born?
3. What was the name of the theater his plays were performed?
4. What are the three types of plays that Shakespeare wrote?
5. In what year did Shakespeare die?
Warm up: Write a sentence that includes
the following facts: Julius Caesar is written
by Shakespeare, it's about the use and abuse
of power, and is more about Brutus and
Antony than about Caesar. While writing,
make a new line every time you get to ten
syllables. (syl-la-ble has 3 syllables)
Iambic Pentameter
Brutus is "at war with himself" regarding his
feelings toward Caesar. He wants to be an
"honorable man," but fears Caesar might be
too powerful.

What would it take for you to betray a friend
of yours?
Warm Up
Character Analysis
For homework, you will analyze 4 main characters from Act I: Caesar, Brutus, Casca, and Cassius. For each, list:
1. Three adjectives to describe that character and an explanation of why you chose each adjective. Select an excerpt from the play that supports that adjective and write the quote down.
2. This person's relationship to Caesar and what they think about him (using textual evidence). For Caesar, choose another character and explain what he thinks of them.
3. A description of what it would be like in a perfect world from this character's perspective (textual evidence).
Warm Up
Go back into Act I, Scenes i and ii (I.i and I.ii) and identify the meaning of the following words. Use the definitions in the notes on the side of the page to help guide you.
1. Wherefore
2. Thou
3. Pray
4. Naughty knave
5. Exeunt
6. Ides
7. Soothsayer
8. Ere
Warm up
Combine the following sentences into one.
1. Brutus is not sure what to do about Caesar.
2. Brutus is a good friend to Caesar.
3. Brutus is outside in the middle of the night.
4. Portia, Brutus' wife, is upset with him.
How many warnings have we as the audience received that something bad will happen on March 15? Identify all examples from the text and provide page/line number and a brief summary of each example.
Analysis
Warm up
Think about a time when you have either warned someone of something or when you have been warned. Write a paragraph response (5 sentences) explaining the situation and what the outcome was.
Review
Which of the following statements would NOT need to be cited on a Works Cited page?
a. Caesar was killed by conspirators in 44 B.C.
b. Caesar first wore his purple garb for the first time in public at the feast of Lupercal on February 15
c. Caesar was stabbed at least 23 times and landed at the base of a statue of Pompey
d. Caesar deserved to live and should not have been killed by the senators
Practice
BRUTUS

Grant that, and then is death a benefit:
So are we Caesar's friends, that have abridged
His time of fearing death. Stoop, Romans, stoop,
And let us bathe our hands in Caesar's blood
Up to the elbows, and besmear our swords:
Then walk we forth, even to the market-place,
And, waving our red weapons o'er our heads,
Let's all cry 'Peace, freedom and liberty!'
The author most likely includes this passage to show

a. that the conspirators are not ashamed of their actions
b. that the conspirators are still bloodthirsty
c. that the conspirators are afraid of the citizens
d. that the conspirators wish Caesar were still alive
Warm up
Write a paragraph response explaining whether or not you feel Caesar deserved to die. Include details and examples from the text to support your paragraph.
Revisit Act 3 and analyze the rhetorical strategies/methods of persuasion (MOPs) used by Brutus and Antony.
1. Identify Brutus' MOPs
& explain examples
2. Explain whether each
is persuasive or not
3. What is the biggest problem
with Brutus' speech? Why?
4. Identify Antony's MOPs
& explain examples
5. Explain whether each
is persuasive or not
6. What is the best part of Antony's speech? Why?
If you could have anything you wanted, what would it be and why? Keep in mind it can only be one thing. Explain your thinking in a well-developed paragraph (at least 5 sentences). Be sure to include a topic sentence.
Warm Up
Homework
Did you know Shakespeare invented the word "swagger?" In fact, he invented over 1,700 words in the English language. Tonight, look up words that Shakespeare invented and write down your 10 favorites. Post to Edmodo and explain which word or phrase you like the most that he invented.
Warm up
Now that Caesar is dead, who do you think will rule Rome? Defend your answer!
So who was JC?
Full transcript