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Physical Education

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janice marsada

on 6 March 2013

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Transcript of Physical Education

BASKETBALL DR. JAMES NAISMITH Invented Basketball in December 1891.
The name of the game is "Naismith ball" before "Basketball".
- the concept of basketball came from "duck-on-a rock" Born in Ramsay township, mar Almonte, Ontario Canada in November 6, 1861 Equipments of Naismith Ball Ball Peach Basket Notable Years December 1891
-The start of Basketball January 15, 1892
- The 1st set of Rules were introduced 1897 - 1898
- 5 players became standard OBJECTIVES - To shoot the ball to the opponents basket - 40 mins. for Ordinary - 48 mins. for NBA & PBA - 5 mins. extension for tie COMPONENTS Agility Endurance
Speed
Stamina
Coordination
Careful Judgment TYPES OF SKILLS PASSING Chest Past - ball line w/ the chest.
Bounce Past - hit the ball to the floor.
Overhead - Above your head
Baseball pass - use if your teammates is very for catching Receiving/Catching Footwork - determines the body movement Dribbling High Dribbling - use if the opponents away from you.
Low Dribbling - use if the opponents closer to you. Shooting Free throw
Lay-up
Jump shot
hook shot
dunk shot
bank shot Rebounding Attempted to measure a miss shot BASKETBALL COURT FOOTWORKS Feet are comfortable spread apart slightly more than shoulder width.
Weight is equally distributed on both feet.
All though both feet are flat on the floor, weight should be forwarded on the balls of the feet to allow for the quick movement.
Knees & waist one bent. Your back straight but not tense.
Elbows are bent & hands are in your sight w/ the fingers spread & palms facing away from you. The precise posistion of the arms & hand will drill/ the elbow in 2 - 6 inches from the body & the hands at about waist level w/ the figures pointing upward.
Head & Chin one up. You are looking straight ahead.
Be comfortable. Every joint should be at last or little Bent. EXERCISES Rope Skipping - this will increase footwork, tiring, agility and stamina.
Line hopping - see how many times you can hop back and forth over line in one minute.
Heel Raises - this will strengthen your (knees) calf muscles.
Stair climbing - this will strengthen your thigh muscles.
Wall sitting - place your back flat agaisnt a wall w/ both feel flat on the floor slide your back down on the wall until your knees are bent to go.
Running backward - this will increase the strength of your handstrings.
Run in place - begin slowly picking your feet up at least 4 inches off the floor.
Jumping Jack - Stand w/ your legs together and your hands at your sides.
Head hang - Let your head hang down so your chin is almost on your chest.
Arms & shoulder stretch - reach other both arms straight up over your head & reach for the sky.
Waist & Side stretch - Keeping you legs straight, bend forward at the waist and let your hand and arms falls towards the floor.
Thigh stretch - Stand on your left foot by holding your right ankle with your right hand.
Hamstring Stretch - Squad down and reach the both hand between your legs , placing all five fingers on the floor behind each heels.
Grain Stretch - sit with the rules of your feet pressed together w/ your knees at and your forearms resting on the insides of the knee. Achilles Jendon Stretch - Stand twice inches from a wall, facing it.
Abnominals - Lie on your back with your knees bent as much as possible and your arms chest w/ your left hand in your right armpit and your right hand in your left armpit.
Arms, chest, fingers & hands - lie on your stomach and keep the back as straight as possible.
Cooldown - after you finish your workout, it is important that you do a cooldown. BALL
Spherical
30 inches in circumference
20 - 22 inches/567-624 grams.
made of leather BASKET Blackboard Fan shape
54 inches wide X 3 inches high
Rectangular 72 inch wide X 48 inch high. CROOD FOOTWORK is the basic for developing good timing, yet despite the feet basketball is a game in w/c ten players are in almost constant motion. TYPES OF SKILLS Basic Stance - this is a the portion from w/c you will make most footwork movements.
- the purpose of the BASIC STANCE is to find a body position from w/c you can move, stop, jump and change direction most easily. DRILL Begin in your Basic stance.
Pattern your feet by picking up one foot & three inches off the floor, putting it down, and picking up the other foot two or three inches and replacing it on the floor.
Your weight should be on the balls of your feet and your head is up.
Continue pattering as quickly as possible for is see. While maintaining your basic stance, constant rhythm of your feet, and good healthy balance.
Repeat this 4 with 15-sec periods in between.
CHANGE OF PACE the secrets in the change of pace and direction are in the words timing and change. TIMING making the right move at the right time. QUICKNESS OF THE MOVE the difference of pace and direction of a move and the rate at w/c changes are made. DEFINITION the ability to change your speed or pace is important in almost every fact of basketball. Drill F - 2 Begin running at the point A and half speed around the basketball court to your right.
After ten steps, speed up to 3 quarters of your maximum speed.
Continue at this pace for 10 strikes & slow down quickly to your original pace of speed.
Your head is up and you are looking straight ahead.
Repeat the 5times as you run around the court.
Repeat steps 1-5 running in other direction, to your left or clockwise.
Repeat steps 1-6, changing from one quarter speed to 3 quarter speed. half speed to full speed, and one quarter speed to full speed. CHANGE OF DIRECTION - 45' The resultant lower - body position will give you better balance.
lowering your body position makes it easier to change direction.
point the toe of the left foot, point the toe of the right foot in the direction you want to go.
The effectiveness of the change in direction is based on the sharpness of the pivot. DRILL F-3 Begin at point A and, stepping with your left foot finest, run at half speed up the right side line for then steps.
On your tenth step, plant your right foot firmly and pivot on the ball of your right foot 1/8 to your left.
Push hands on your right foot and continue running on the diagonal line for 9 steps.
When your left foot hands on the ninth step. plant it firmly and pivot in the ball of that foot one - eight of a time to your right.
Push off hands on your right foot and continue running on the diagonal line for 9 steps.
When your left foot hands on the ninth step. plant it firmly and pivot in the ball of that foot one-eight of a time to your right.
Push off hands in your left foot and continue running at half speed for another nine steps.
Now pivot again on your Right foot and continue running.
Your read is up and you are looking straight ahead.
Repeat this up and down the court five times.
Repeat steps 1-8 changing your speeds and the number of steps between changes. CHANGE OF DIRECTION 90' Begin at point A and stepping, if your left foot first, run of half speed up the right side line for 10 steps.
On your tenth step, plant your right foot firmly, and point on the ball of your right foot one quarter of a turn to the left.
Push off and continue running across count for a step.
When your left foot lands on the ninth step, plant it firmly and pivot on the of that one quarter of a turn to your right and continue running at the half speed.
Keep your head up and look straight ahead.
Repeat this up and down the court five times.
Repeat steps 1 - 6 changing your speeds & the number of steps between change of direction.
BACK PEDALING is commonly used on defense when you wish to retreat quickly but not lose right of the ball. DRILL F-8 Begin at point A, facing the foul line with both feet on the base line in the 3sec. area under the basket.
Sprint to the foul line, point D and touch the floor with hands.
Backpedal to the base line and touch the floor with both hands.
Continue this for the 15 sec. and repeat the drill until your have completed. Advance Step is similar to the slide except that you will move forward instead of sideways . Many of the same principles for the slide apply to the advance step. DRILL F-9 Begin at point A on the base line, facing the foul line in the 3seconds area.
You are in your basic stance w/ your left foot because forward so that the hip your right toe is even w/ the back of your left heel.
Your feet are still at least shoulder w/ apart.
Your first step forward is w/ the forward on left foot. The step should not be too long, as you will lose good body position and balance.
After the left foot steps faces the heel of the left foot and your weight shifts onto the left foot.
After the left foot step forward, the right foot times naturally so that the steps faces the heel of the left foot and your weight shifts the left foot.
After your weight forward onto the left foot, the right foot, as though on a string attached to the left foot, slide forward so that your feet are back on their original position.
Advance step to the foul line, point B & step.
When you reach the foul line, you must turn back foot, in this case the right, so that you'll be pointing straight ahead before repeating.
Back pedal to the base line.
Continue this for 30 sec.
Repeat step 1-10 w/ the right as the forward foot . REPEAT STEP is the same as the advance step done in reverse. Your feet should not cross.
Try to retreat step w/ many littler steps instead of big steps.
Maintain good body balance w/ a low centers of gravity and your head up. JUMP SHOT Executed w/ both feet landing simultaneously. DRILL F-11 Walk straight ahead to 10 steps.
As you get to the last of your walk, bend your knees so you are lower and make that lost step a little shorter.
Jump in the air off your feet and land flat on your two feet at the same time without taking another step.
Upon landing, your head should be up, knees bent and feet parallel, at least a shoulder width apart.
At first, practice this with as slow.
Repeat steps 1-5 taking off an the right foot.
Increase your speed to a run only after you can do the drill perfectly five times in a row jumping off each foot.
Practice the jump stop at many speed w/ right and left footed take offs. FRONT PIVOT Walk straight ahead for ten steps & jump stop.
Be sure that after you land on jump stop, you are in a good basic stance w/ your feet spread atleast a shoulder width apart & parallel, knees w/ head ups.
Forward of not pivot clockwise in the ball of your Right foot 90' or one quarter turn to your right.
Practice this 10times & Repeat using the foot as your pivot.
Repeat steps 1-4 pivoting 180' or a half turn on your pivots. REVERSED PIVOT Important when playing man-to-man defense, boxing at during rebounding and executimg posting moves. DRILL F-14 Walk straight ahead for 10 steps and jump stops.
Be sure that after your land are in a good w/ your feet spread atleast a shoulder width apart and parallel, knees bent & head up.
Reverse pivot counter clockwise on the ball of your right foot 90' or one quarter turn to your left.
Practice this ten times & repeat using left foot as your pivot.
Repeat steps 1-4 pivoting 180' or a foot turn on your pivot. VOLLEYBALL WILLIAM G. MORGAN Invented Volleyball
Born in Lockport, New York, USA OFFICIALS Referee
Asst. Referees
Score Keeper
Timer JERSEY SHORTS SHOES The first rules, written down by William G Morgan, called for a net 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m) high, a 25×50 ft (7.6×15.2 m) court, and any number of players. A match was composed of nine innings with three serves for each team in each inning, and no limit to the number of ball contacts for each team before sending the ball to the opponents’ court. In case of a serving error, a second try was allowed. Hitting the ball into the net was considered a foul (with loss of the point or a side-out)—except in the case of the first-try serve. HISTORY The first official ball used in volleyball is disputed; some sources say that Spalding created the first official ball in 1896, while others claim it was created in 1900. The rules evolved over time: in the Philippines by 1916, the skill and power of the set and spike had been introduced, and four years later a "three hits" rule and a rule against hitting from the back row were established. In 1917, the game was changed from 21 to 15 points. In 1919, about 16,000 volleyballs were distributed by the American Expeditionary Forces to their troops and allies, which sparked the growth of volleyball in new countries. HISTORY The first official ball used in volleyball is disputed; some sources say that Spalding created the first official ball in 1896, while others claim it was created in 1900. The rules evolved over time: in the Philippines by 1916, the skill and power of the set and spike had been introduced, and four years later a "three hits" rule and a rule against hitting from the back row were established. In 1917, the game was changed from 21 to 15 points. In 1919, about 16,000 volleyballs were distributed by the American Expeditionary Forces to their troops and allies, which sparked the growth of volleyball in new countries.

The first country outside the United States to adopt volleyball was Canada in 1900. An international federation, the Fédération Internationale de Volleyball (FIVB), was founded in 1947, and the first World Championships were held in 1949 for men and 1952 for women. The sport is now popular in Brazil, in Europe (where especially Italy, the Netherlands, and countries from Eastern Europe have been major forces since the late 1980s), in Russia, and in other countries including China and the rest of Asia, as well as in the United States.

Beach volleyball, a variation of the game played on sand and with only two players per team, became a FIVB-endorsed variation in 1987 and was added to the Olympic program at the 1996 Summer Olympics. Volleyball is also a sport at the Paralympics managed by the World Organization Volleyball for Disabled.

Nudists were early adopters of the the game with regular organized play in clubs as early as the late 1920's. By the 1960's, a volleyball court had become standard in almost all nudist/naturist clubs. COURT A volleyball court is 18 m (59 ft) long and 9 m (29.5 ft) wide, divided into 9 m × 9 m halves by a one-meter (40-inch) wide net. The top of the net is 2.43 m (7 ft 11 5/8 in) above the center of the court for men's competition, and 2.24 m (7 ft 4 1/8 in) for women's competition, varied for veterans and junior competitions.
A line 3 m (9.84 ft) from and parallel to the net is considered the "attack line". This "3 meter" (or "10 foot") line divides the court into "back row" and "front row" areas (also back court and front court). These are in turn divided into 3 areas each: these are numbered as follows, starting from area "1", which is the position of the serving player. BALL Indoor volleyballs are designed for the indoor version of the sport, and beach volleyballs for the beach game.
Indoor volleyballs may be solid white or a combination of two or three different easily distinguishable colors. They are made in two versions: the youth version is slightly smaller and weighs much less than an adult volleyball and than the standard version to accommodate youth's use.
Beach volleyballs are slightly larger than standard indoor balls, have a rougher external texture, and a lower internal pressure. They can be brightly colored or solid white. Most are usually solid white. SCORING When the ball contacts the floor within the court boundaries or an error is made, the team that did not make the error is awarded a point, whether they served the ball or not. If the ball hits the line, the ball is counted as in. The team that won the point serves for the next point. If the team that won the point served in the previous point, the same player serves again. If the team that won the point did not serve the previous point, the players of the team rotate their position on the court in a clockwise manner. The game continues, with the first team to score 25 points by a two-point margin is awarded the set. Matches are best-of-five sets and the fifth set, if necessary, is usually played to 15 points. (Scoring differs between leagues, tournaments, and levels; high schools sometimes play best-of-three to 25; in the NCAA games are played best-of-five to 25 as of the 2008 season.)
Before 1999, points could be scored only when a team had the serve (side-out scoring) and all sets went up to only 15 points. The FIVB changed the rules in 1999 (with the changes being compulsory in 2000) to use the current scoring system (formerly known as rally point system), primarily to make the length of the match more predictable and to make the game more spectator- and television-friendly. SKILLS Service - A player stands behind the inline and serves the ball, in an attempt to drive it into the opponent's court.
Pass - Also called reception, the pass is the attempt by a team to properly handle the opponent's serve, or any form of attack.
Set - The set is usually the second contact that a team makes with the ball. The main goal of setting is to put the ball in the air in such a way that it can be driven by an attack into the opponent's court.
Attack - also known as the spike, is usually the third contact a team makes with the ball. The object of attacking is to handle the ball so that it lands on the opponent's court and cannot be defended.
Block - Blocking refers to the actions taken by players standing at the net to stop or alter an opponent's attack. A block that is aimed at completely stopping an attack, thus making the ball remain in the opponent's court, is called offensive.
Dig - is the ability to prevent the ball from touching one's court after a spike or attack, particularly a ball that is nearly touching the ground. Officials Scorer - The official scorer keeps track of the score throughout the volleyball game.
Line Judges - At least two, and as many as four, line judges monitor each game. The line judges stand at the corners of the court watching the lines to indicate whether a ball in play falls in or out of the court.
1st Referee - The first referee stands on the referee stand and controls the play of the entire game. Whatever issues arise during the game, the first referee determines the call and the has the final say.
2nd Referee - The second referee works to assist the first referee throughout the game. If for some reason the first referee can't finish her duties, the second referee may take the place of the first referee.
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