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Arms and the Boy

A Joe Hodge and Mallory Towle Production
by

Mallory Towle

on 5 April 2013

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Transcript of Arms and the Boy

Arms and the Boy Joe Hodge and Mallory Towle Figures of Speech "For his teeth seem for laughing round an apple." (9) Personification Juxtaposition/Imagery Speaker and Audience Dramatic
Situation - Speaking as Second Lieutenant, himself as a commander
of war.
- Speaking to himself
- Speaking to civilians/public
+ "Let the boy try along this bayonet-blade" (1) - Wartime, outfitting a boy with weapons
+ "How cold steel is," (2)
- Somber
- Critical
- Defeated
- Pedagogical
+ "Lend him to stroke these blind, blunt
bullet-leads," (5) - Loss of innocence
- Death
- Cruel/Inhuman nature of war/weapons VS
humanity and innocence "Or give him cartridges of fine zinc teeth" (7)
"For his teeth seem for laughing round an apple" (9)

"How cold steel is, and keen with hunger of blood;" (2)
"Blue with all malice," (3)

"And thinly drawn with famishing for flesh." (4) "Keen with hunger of blood" (2)
"Blue with all malice" (3)
"Famishing for flesh" (4)
"blind, blunt bullet-leads"(5)
"[bullets] long to nuzzle in the hearts of lads" (6)
+Dual meaning
+Roman - Quatrains
+Organization of 3 ideas
+ Aids half-rhyme scheme
w/o adding chaos
- Alliteration
+"famishing for flesh." (4)
+"blind, blunt bullet-leads," (5)
+"through the thickness" (12) By Wilfred Owen Let the boy try along this bayonet-blade
How cold steel is, and keen with hunger of blood;
Blue with all malice, like a madman's flash;
And thinly drawn with famishing for flesh.

Lend him to stroke these blind, blunt bullet-heads
Which long to nuzzle in the hearts of lads.
Or give him cartridges of fine zinc teeth,
Sharp with the sharpness of grief and death.

For his teeth seem for laughing round an apple.
There lurk no claws behind his fingers supple;
And God will grow no talons at his heels,
Nor antlers through the thickness of his curls. a
a
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f Pre-war Wartime Poetry - Private Tutor
- Teacher
- Started writing poetry at young age
- Considered a career as a clergyman
before enlisting - Commissioned officer (second lieutenant)
+ Commanded a platoon
- Experienced physical and mental trauma
+ Treated for Shell shock
+ Met Siegfried Sassoon
- Returned to front line
+ Died storming a number
of enemy strong points
- Awarded Military Cross - Most poems published during war
- Mentored by Sassoon
- Famous for using near rhyme and irony Wilfred Owen
1893 - 1918 Form and Content Setting and Tone Theme and Purpose Allusions "Arms and the Boy" Meaning - God's creation and design
- Apple relating to temptation
of Adam
- Enlisting was falsely
romantic - Virgil's - "Arms, and the man I sing, who, forc'd by fate,
And haughty Juno's unrelenting hate,
Expell'd and exil'd, left the Trojan shore." - Virgil's epic poem glorifies battle and fate - Owen changed "man" to "boy" - Innocence and irony - Genre: war poem

- Heroic Couplets: two
rhymed lines in iambic
pentameter

- Half-rhyme: characteristic of Owen Context - Written in 1918, the same year Owen died

- "Owen classified it in his draft list of contents under 'Protest - the unnaturalness of weapons'. Later he listed it among the poems intended for his first collection." Sources
Image: "Wilfred Owen." Wikipedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 5 Apr. 2013.<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilfred_Owen>.

Poem: Owen, Wilfred. "Arms and the Boy by Wilfred Owen : The Poetry Foundation ." Poetry Foundation. N.p., n.d. Web. 5 Apr. 2013. <http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/176

"Arms and the Boy." The Wilfred Owen Association. N.p., n.d. Web. 5 Apr. 2013. <http://www.wilfredowen.org.uk/poetry/arms-and-the-boy>.

Virgil Quotation: Virgil. "The Aeneid by Virgil." The Internet Classics Archive. N.p., n.d. Web. 5 Apr. 2013. <http://classics.mit.edu/Virgil/aeneid.1.i.html>.
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