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How World War 2 Changed the Life of the Japanese

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Emiko Vasquez

on 13 December 2013

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Transcript of How World War 2 Changed the Life of the Japanese

Nitesh Nayesh
Silvia Torsellini
Kyle Trinidad
Shai Valoa
Emiko Vasquez

QUESTIONS?
HOW WORLD WAR II CHANGED THE LIFE OF THE JAPANESE
The position of women in Japan prior to WWII is the result of three philosophies
WORKS CITED
CONCLUSION
"It wasn't merely the overthrow of their military...it was the collapse of a faith...of everything they believed in and lived by . . ."
In textbooks, we always learn about the Japanese-American internment camps, but we rarely ever hear about how they were affected in other ways.
Prior to World War II, the Japanese, both those living in Japan and the United States had a set way of life. The events leading up to the war, during the war, and the aftermath of it all drastically changed their way of life.

During WWII

During WWII
-Japan was seen as the hated enemy
-Mass media portrayed Japanese as savages (Saeki 155).
After WWII
- U.S. and Japan became allies
- Racial hostility toward the Japanese subsided
- Resulted in a massive transformation of the image of Japan
The Transformation
- "U.S. mass media promoted a traditional view of women and children as weak and helpless in postwar Japan" (Saeki 156).
-Americans liked to see U.S. soldiers being kind to the Japanese who were vulnerable in pictures
- Caused Americans to feel benevolent towards Japan and more likely to see the Japanese as our friends in need of help
"Amerasian"
Romanticizing the Japanese
Thesis: Japan's forfeit to the United States forced Native Japanese and Japanese-Americans to assimilate to American social norms in order to be accepted by the Western nation.
Geisha 411
Originated in 18th century Japan
Defined as "entertainers" or "artistes".
They perform traditional dance, play instruments and sing. Expert in tea ceremony and all aspects of dining.
Maiko: Apprentice geisha, from very young age (4)
In recent times, a few non-Japanese women have become geisha.
Anti-Japanese Sentiment In the United States
The Panay Incident (1937)- The Japanese accidentally bombed a U.S. battleship. They apologized, and payed for the cost. Congress believed there were other intentions.

Pear Harbor (1941)- Japanese resented the U.S. for the embargo that restricted Japan from expanding into China. In order to weaken the U.S naval forces before declaring war, Japanese air force launched a surprise attack on American naval base on Pearl Harbor. Pear Harbor (1941)- Japanese resented the U.S. for the embargo that restricted Japan from expanding into China. In order to weaken the U.S naval forces before declaring war, Japanese air force launched a surprise attack on American naval base on Pearl Harbor. Pear Harbor (1941)- Japanese resented the U.S. for the embargo that restricted Japan from expanding into China. In order to weaken the U.S naval forces before declaring war, Japanese air force launched a surprise attack on American naval base on Pearl Harbor.

Rise to
Xenophobia (noun): Intense fear of people from other countries
President Roosevelt: Executive Order 9066
Japanese-Americans were interned due to espionage fear


-Onna Daigaku meant "Greater Learning for Women"

- was a code or handbook on how women should act during this time period

-The author believed women should be secondary to men and their entire world should consist of housework, reproduction and child rearing
Full transcript