Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Audre Lordes

No description
by

Dana Burrows

on 6 May 2010

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Audre Lordes

Audre Geraldine Lordes Her Life Her Work Coal "black, lesbian, mother, warrior, poet" born February 18, 1924 in Harlem, New York
died November 17, 1992 of breast cancer
ducation BA in literature and philosophy - 1959
Masters of Library Science - 1960 Her parents immigrated from Granada. Began writing poetry at age 13. 1968 - Met her life partner Frances Clayton As a child, Lordes spoke in poetry. When she couldn't express herself through other peoples words, she began writing her own poetry. In 1962, she married and had 2 children "I have a duty to speak the truth as I see it and share not just my triumphs, not just the things that felt good, but the pain, the intense, often unmitigating pain." Her first poem was published in Seventeen Magizine when she was still in high school. and divorced in 1970 Audre Lordes was concerned mainly with society's tendency to characterize groups of people Her works, though sapphic and racially driven, are accessable to all Awards/Honors

National Endowment for the Arts grant 1968 & 1981
Creative Artist Public Service grant 1972 & 1976
Nationa Book Awards nominee 1974
Broadside Poets Award 1975
Woman of the Year, Statten Island Community College 1975
Borough of Manhatten Presidents Award for literary excellence 1987
Walt Witman Citation of Merit, Poet Laureate of New York 1991



Her experiences with civil unrest in the 1960s as a black gay woman. Lorde published 20 books of poetry and prose Zami- A New Spelling of My Name mentioned in From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun Melanin realized that the reason why so many women were at her funeral was because she was gay, and also that she was a lesbian poet (obviously) because his mother read her work. Major Book Titles Critical Responces The First Cities
Cable to Rage
Coal
The Black Unicorn
Sister Outsider
A Burst of Light
Zami: A New Spelling of My Name
Uses of the Erotic: The Erotic as Power
The Collected Poems of Audre Lordes Co-Founder of The Kitchen Table - Women of Color Press & an editor of the lesbian journal Chrysalis by: Jacqueline Woodson www.unbsj.ca/arts/english/lordes http:/likeawhisper.files.wordpress.com/2009/o2/audre.jpg I
is the total black
being spoken
from the earth's inside.

There are many kinds of open
how a diamond comes
into a knot of flame
how sound comes into a word
colored
by who pays what for speaking

Some words are open
diamonds on a glass window
singing out within the crash
of passing sun
other words are stapled wagers
in a perforated book
buy and sign and tear apart
and come whatever wills all chance
the stub remains
an ill-pulled tooth
with a ragged edge.

Some words live in my throat
breeding like adders
others
know sun
seeking like gypsies
over my tongue
to explode through my lips
like young sparrows
bursting from shell.

Some words
bedevil me.

Love is a word, another kind of open.
As the diamond comes
into a knot of flame
I am Black
because I come from the earth's inside
take my word for jewel
in the open light.

I
is the total black
being spoken
from the earth's inside. There are many kinds of open
how a diamond comes
into a knot of flame
how sound comes into a word
colored
by who pays what for speaking

Some words are open
diamonds on a glass window
singing out within the crash
of passing sun
other words are stapled wagers
in a perforated book
buy and sign and tear apart
and come whatever wills all chance
the stub remains
an ill-pulled tooth
with a ragged edge.
Some words live in my throat
breeding like adders
others
know sun
seeking like gypsies
over my tongue
to explode through my lips
like young sparrows
bursting from shell. Some words
bedevil me.
Love is a word, another kind of open.
As the diamond comes
into a knot of flame
I am Black
because I come from the earth's inside
take my word for jewel
in the open light. Coal is a staple fuel, that is mined from the inside of the earth. Diamonds are luxurious stones that are yeilded from extreme pressure on coal.

The author seems to only become a diamond when she expresses herself. Otherwise, she is speaking from underground, which means her words will not be heard. The puntuation of the line
is open, allowing the reader
to read without hesitaion,
the real meaning to her first stanza







The connection is made here between
the diamond and the coal, as being the
same as a sound becoming a word.

The author is saying that for her to remain
quiet, she is just coal, black on the outside
for all to judge, but if she speaks up, she becomes a diamond, through the pressure
and predjudice, she has something to say. Reprecussions for expressing herself and being black. : reguardless she is a black woman
: the meaning is changed by who owns the words - like a prism, diverging.

- some words are free to be spoken Some words are bound and can be obtained at a cost.
- There are limits to these words, as they are bound to the book, and tangeble objects.
Lordes frowns on these types of words, descibing them as an ill-pulled tooth. The pain and blood of the image get her point across. Living in the throat is like living
in the ground as coal, restricted,
in the dark, compressed and crowded. Free to move and adventure The Blackness in the poem emphasized
the poet as activist and leader.
- Sagri Dhairyam

The words have set her free and allowed
her to become a diamond.
- Audrey Whelan

One of Lorde's principal themes concerns
her reaction to racist attitudes and acts;
her response to racism is, in a word, anger.
- Claudia Tate
She is emphasizing love, to emphasize hate. She explains the driving metaphor of the peice:
coal becomes a diamond the way that she (coal)
can become a diamond when her sounds become
words.

She is stating that she is black, and that she has something valid and meaningful to say. She
wants to be recognized as a poet, reguardless
of her race.
Full transcript