Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

CAVITE MUTINY

No description
by

Kristelle Lejos

on 10 August 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of CAVITE MUTINY

CAVITE MUTINY
Cavite Mutiny (1872)
-A remarkable event event during 19th century in the Philippines.

-An uprising of military personnel of Fort San Felipe, the Spanish arsenal in Cavite, Philippines on January 20, 1872.
Cavite Mutiny: SPANISH PERSPECTIVE
Cavite Mutiny: SPANISH PERSPECTIVE
-Jose Montero y Vidal, a Spanish historian documented the event and highlighted it as an attempt of Indios to overthrow the Spanish Gov't in the Philippines.

-Gov. Gen, Rafael Izquierido made use of this to implicate the native clergy, which was then active in the call for secularization.
Cavite Mutiny: SPANISH PERSPECTIVE
- Izquierido and Montero scored out that the main reason of the revolution are the abolition of priviledeges of the workers of Cavite.

-Izquierido reported to the King of Spain that the 'rebels' wanted to overthrow the Spanish gov't to install a new "hari" in the likes of Father Burgos and Zamora.
Cavite Mutiny: SPANISH PERSPECTIVE
-On February 17, 1872, the GOMBURZA were executed to instill fear among the Filipinos so that they may never commit such daring act again.
Cavite Mutiny: FILIPINO PERSPECTIVE
-In Dr. Trinidad Hermenigildo Pardo de Tavera's point of view, the incident was amere mutiny by the native Filipino soldiers and laborers.
Cavite Mutiny: FILIPINO PERSPECTIVE
-On January 20, 1872, about 200 men comprised of soldiers, laborers of the arsenal and residents of Cavite headed by Sergeant Lamadrid rose in arms and assasinated the commanding officers and Spanish offers in sight.
Cavite Mutiny: FILIPINO PERSPECTIVE
- The Central Government of Spain welcomed an educational decree authored by Segismundo Moret promoted the fusion of sectarian schools run by the friars into a school called "Philippine Institute".
Cavite Mutiny: FILIPINO PERSPECTIVE
-The friars, fearing that their influence would be a thing of the past, took advantage of the incident and presented it to the Spanish gov't as a vast conspiracy with the objective of destroying Spanish sovereignity.
Cavite Mutiny: FILIPINO PERSPECTIVE
-Convicted educated men who participated in the mutiny were sentenced life imprisonment while members of the native clergy headed by the GOMBURZA were executed by garrote.

-This leads to the awakening of nationalism and eventually to the outbreak of Philippine Revolution of 1896.
The GOMBURZA
GOMBURZA
Mariano Gomez
-The first priest to be executed and the oldest of the three martyrs.

-His famous last words were:

"Let us go where the leaves never move without the will of God."
Jacinto Zamora
-He was implicated in the Cavite Mutiny due to an invitation that read in part "Grand reunion...our friends are well provided with powder and ammunition" which sounded ominous to the military but this was simply an invitation to play cards. (Panguigui)

-He has no famous lines.
GOMBURZA
Jose Burgos
Jose Burgos
-One arresting detail during is execution is him suddenly standing up from the garrote seat and shouting:

"What crime have I committed to deserve such a death? Is there no justice in the world?"
Twelve friars restrained him, advising him to accept Christian death. he calmed down but go up again shouting:

"But I haven't committed any crime!"

At which point, one of the friars holding him down hissed, "Even Christ was innocent!"
References:
-nhcp.gov.ph
-jackeline.freehomepage.com

Reported by EDUC and PSYCH 1411
(Group 3)
The End
Full transcript