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The Lottery

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Alex Winninghoff

on 14 August 2015

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Transcript of The Lottery

Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
COMMON CORE STANDARD
DISTRICT POWER STANDARD
Determine main idea and important details in an informational /expository text and a literary selection/narrative text.
PS2, LT3
WHY SHOULD WE LEARN THIS?
Learning the theme and developing a clear summary is a key component to analyzing literature. Not only will the ability to summarize and state theme help you on standardized tests, but it will teach you how to identify what is very important in a text. Stating theme and an unbiased summary helps you become an articulate and concise speaker/writer.
SUMMARIZING
YOU WILL ASK YOURSELF
Break it down. Select 4 sentences-1 paragraph, and write a summary of what the author is saying. See if you can explain their main point in 1-2 sentences.
What is the theme/main point of this section?
What, in simple terms, is the author saying?
What did I learn from this section of the text?
PREDICTING & INFERRING
YOU WILL ASK YOURSELF
You will make PREDICTIONS by guessing what will happen in the text.
You will make INFERENCE by making an educated guess about what will happen next based on information from the text. You will write your predictions/inferences in the margins
What is the text about?
What will happen next?
How can I use clues from the text to help me figure out what the author doesn’t say?
QUESTIONING & FINDING ANSWERS IN THE TEXT
YOU WILL ASK YOURSELF
Be a detective. You will find parts of the text that you don't understand, write a question in the margins, and as you find the answers in the text, you will answer your own questions.
I wonder…?
“What do I want to know more about?
CLARIFYING
YOU WILL ASK YOURSELF
Restate confusing sections in your own words. As you read, you will circle, highlight, or underline confusing sections or words, and rewrite the meaning in your own words.
Does the text make sense?
Can I reread, read ahead, read captions to help myself understand?
Am I learning what I need to know?
VISUALIZE & IMAGINE
YOU WILL ASK YOURSELF
What pictures do you see in your head? Use imagery to describe what you imagine, and/or draw pictures in the margin to connect your imagination to the text.
What pictures do I see in my head when I read this?
How does this section of the text connect to all my senses?
ANNOTATION/5 SKILLS OF A GOOD READER
As you read, you will annotate
(write in the margins of the text)

5 annotations will be predictions and inferences
5 annotations will be questions/answers
5 annotations will be clarifications
5 annotations will be summaries
5 annotations will be examples of imagery and visualization

YOUR 25 ANNOTATIONS WILL BE GRADED
5 SKILLS OF A GOOD READER
THE AGENDA
Class Business (turn in work, assignments for the week, etc.)
Who is joining the classroom lottery?
Review 5 Skills of a Good Reader.
Begin "The Lottery" by Shirley Jackson.
DO NOW
Get out all assignments that are due, a pencil or a pen. Get out several pieces of notebook paper.Write your name on a small piece of paper to enter the class lottery.
SOMEONE IS GOING TO WIN!
CLASS BUSINESS
TURN IN WORK DUE
NEW ASSIGNMENTS
"The Lottery" annotations.
Five-paragraph persuasive essay
DUE FRIDAY
PROMPT:
Should we always abide by the laws and rules of our communities? Is it ever appropriate to challenge those in power? Why or why not?
WHO WANTS TO BE IN THE CLASSROOM LOTTERY?
Here is the deal:
You must decide to put your name in now.
You do not get to know what you win.
Once you make your decision, it is final. You can't add your name later and you can not take your name out.
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
STOP AND ANNOTATE!
In 1948, The New Yorker published Jackson’s iconic story, “The Lottery,” which generated the largest volume of mail ever received by the magazine---before or since---almost all of it hateful. “The Lottery” has since been published in dozens of languages, and is still required reading in U.S. high schools. It is possibly the most well-known short story of the 20th Century.


Shirley Jackson was born in San Francisco in 1916. Her mother was a housewife and her father was an employee of a lithographing company. Most of her early life was spent in Burlingame, California, which she later used as the setting for her first novel, The Road Through the Wall (1948). As a child, she was obsessed with writing, keeping journals to chart her progress. She attended the University of Rochester in upstate New York, but, after suffering from mental depression that was to recur periodically throughout her life, she left school to concentrate solely on writing. She lived quietly at home, writing prolific amounts of material; she conscientiously churned out a thousand works of prose a day. In 1937, she entered Syracuse University, where she published stories in the student literary magazine. It was there that she met her future husband, Stanley Edgar Hyman. After she received her BA degree, Jackson turned to writing full-time, while her husband became a highly respected literary critic. They had four children and settled their family in a large Victorian house in Vermont, where Hyman taught literature at Bennington College. Jackson and Hyman hosted many of the leading literary figures of the 20th century at their home, including Ralph Ellison, J.D. Salinger, Bernard Malamud and Dylan Thomas. She passed away in 1965.

Jackson was methodical and disciplined as she wrote daily for long periods between regular naps. Her first national publication was a humorous story written after a job at a department store during the Christmas rush. "My Life with R. H. Macy" appeared in The New Republic in 1941. She wrote regularly for The Reader's Digest, Colliers, and during the 1950's, published at least 44 short stories, six articles, two book-length family chronicles, one children's nonfiction book, and four novels, all the while raising four children. Despite the demands of rearing her family, she maintained a strict writing schedule, which was rarely interrupted. Jackson's most critically acclaimed work includes "The Lottery", often dramatized and televised, and her novel The Haunting of Hill House successfully adapted into the horror film THE HAUNTING. Ultimately, she wrote over 100 novels, novellas, short stories, plays, children’s books and television scripts. Her work is a major influence on such noted writers as Stephen King, Richard Matheson and Peter Straub.

Jackson's works cover a wide range of themes from psychological horror to family. According to Jonathan Lethem, Jackson was “one of this century's most luminous and strange American writers” whose " forté was psychology and society, people in other words - people disturbed, dispossessed, misunderstanding or thwarting one another compulsively, people colluding absently in monstrous acts”. For example, in her American Gothic novel We Have Always Lived in the Castle, Jackson brilliantly isolates the two aspects of her psyche into two odd, damaged sisters: one hypersensitive, afraid, and agoraphobic, the other a squalid demon prankster who may or may not have murdered the rest of her family for her fragile sister's sake. In addition to her horror stories, Jackson also wrote humorous stories about her chaotic domestic life in such works as Raising Demons and Life Among the Savages

Supported by the Jackson family, The Shirley Jackson Award is granted annually to an author for outstanding achievement in the literature of psychological suspense, horror and the dark fantastic in the categories of novel, novella, novelette, short story, single-author collection, and edited anthology.
, ed. "Shirley Jackson Biography." Literal Media. N.p., 12 2008. Web. 2 Dec 2012. <American Entertainment Holding Company>.
What do you think this story is going to be about? Make a prediction.
Draw an image of this town. What does it look like? What do the people look like? Try to show the feeling or the mood of the town.
Summarize what you have read so far. What are the three most important details so far. Remember, do not include details that are unimportant or do not serve to explain what has happened so far.
Select a word, a sentence, or a paragraph that you found confusing. If you chose a word, re-read the sentence it is in, and see if you can determine it's meaning by context clues. Write the meaning of the word in your own words. If you chose a sentence or a paragraph, re-read it and rewrite it in your own words.
Make a prediction or an inference about why tradition is so important to the towns people. Why do they not want to "upset even as much tradition as was represented by the black box."?
What questions do you have about the town or the lottery so far? Write down a "deep" or "below the surface" question. Instead of asking a question that has an easy answer you can point to, try to ask a question about a bigger topic that you can't find an answer to just by reading. Think hard and see if you can develop an answer.
Draw an image of the towns people and the black box. Pick one character we have been introduced to, and draw an image of them as you see them in your mind.
Select a word, a sentence, or a paragraph that you found confusing. If you chose a word, re-read the sentence it is in, and see if you can determine it's meaning by context clues. Write the meaning of the word in your own words. If you chose a sentence or a paragraph, re-read it and rewrite it in your own words.
Select a word, a sentence, or a paragraph that you found confusing. If you chose a word, re-read the sentence it is in, and see if you can determine it's meaning by context clues. Write the meaning of the word in your own words. If you chose a sentence or a paragraph, re-read it and rewrite it in your own words.
Again, write a brief summary of what you have read so far. What are the three most important details?
Stop and make an inference about the lottery. What do you think the winner will get?
Stop and ask a "deep" or "under the surface" question you have about the story so far.
Write a summary of what has happened since Mrs. Hutchinson arrived at the lottery.
Select a word, a sentence, or a paragraph that you found confusing. If you chose a word, re-read the sentence it is in, and see if you can determine it's meaning by context clues. Write the meaning of the word in your own words. If you chose a sentence or a paragraph, re-read it and rewrite it in your own words.
Draw a picture of Old Man Warner's face. What does his expression look like?
Again, make a prediction about the purpose of the lottery. What new information do you have since your last prediction?
Put all your clues together, detectives. How is Mrs. Hutchinson going to feel when she finds out someone in her family has won the lottery?
Draw an image of the towns people after the lottery has been drawn, and the winning family has been chosen.
Ask a "deep" or "below the surface" question about the story.
Select a word, a sentence, or a paragraph that you found confusing. If you chose a word, re-read the sentence it is in, and see if you can determine it's meaning by context clues. Write the meaning of the word in your own words. If you chose a sentence or a paragraph, re-read it and rewrite it in your own words.
Draw a picture of the family drawing for the lottery.
Write a summary of the lottery process so far. Explain, in three steps, how the lottery winner is chosen.
Write a summary of the story.
Draw a picture of of one of the children drawing for the lottery.
Ask a "deep" or "below the surface" question about any aspect of the story. See if you can locate the answer within the text.
Who will win our class lottery?
Profusely Abundantly; in large amounts
Boisterous Loud and noisy
Reprimands Criticisms; tongue-lashings; scoldings
Reluctantly Unwillingly
Jovial Happy; jolly
Paraphernalia Stuff used for a particular activity
Lottery Any process determined by chance
Ritual Ceremonial or traditional practice
Perfunctory Careless
Lapse Decline
Interminably Endlessly
Soberly Quiet or sedate in demeanor
Gravely Seriously
Petulantly Irritably
Beamed Smiled radiantly or happily
VOCABULARY
T H E L O T T E R Y
B Y S H I R L E Y J A C K S O N
THE LOTTERY
COMPARE AND CONTRAST
VIDEO VS. STORY
VIDEO
STORY
BOTH
Foreshadowing is an advance sign or warning of what is to come in the future. The author of a mystery novel might use foreshadowing in the early chapter of his book to give readers an inkling of an impending murder.

When you want to let people know about an event that is yet to occur, you can use foreshadowing. Foreshadowing is used as a literary device to tease readers about plot turns that will occur later in the story. A fortune teller might use foreshadowing, warning that a short life line is a sign of some impending disaster.
LITERARY DEVICE:
FORESHADOWING
GNIWODAHSEROF
Themes
The Danger of Blindly Following Tradition

The village lottery culminates in a violent murder each year, a bizarre ritual that suggests how dangerous tradition can be when people follow it blindly. Before we know what kind of lottery they’re conducting, the villagers and their preparations seem harmless, even quaint: they’ve appointed a rather pathetic man to lead the lottery, and children run about gathering stones in the town square. Everyone is seems preoccupied with a funny-looking black box, and the lottery consists of little more than handmade slips of paper. Tradition is endemic to small towns, a way to link families and generations. Jackson, however, pokes holes in the reverence that people have for tradition. She writes that the villagers don’t really know much about the lottery’s origin but try to preserve the tradition nevertheless.


The villagers’ blind acceptance of the lottery has allowed ritual murder to become part of their town fabric. As they have demonstrated, they feel powerless to change—or even try to change—anything, although there is no one forcing them to keep things the same. Old Man Warner is so faithful to the tradition that he fears the villagers will return to primitive times if they stop holding the lottery. These ordinary people, who have just come from work or from their homes and will soon return home for lunch, easily kill someone when they are told to. And they don’t have a reason for doing it other than the fact that they’ve always held a lottery to kill someone. If the villagers stopped to question it, they would be forced to ask themselves why they are committing a murder—but no one stops to question. For them, the fact that this is tradition is reason enough and gives them all the justification they need.
The Randomness of Persecution

Villagers persecute individuals at random, and the victim is guilty of no transgression other than having drawn the wrong slip of paper from a box. The elaborate ritual of the lottery is designed so that all villagers have the same chance of becoming the victim—even children are at risk. Each year, someone new is chosen and killed, and no family is safe. What makes “The Lottery” so chilling is the swiftness with which the villagers turn against the victim. The instant that Tessie Hutchinson chooses the marked slip of paper, she loses her identity as a popular housewife. Her friends and family participate in the killing with as much enthusiasm as everyone else. Tessie essentially becomes invisible to them in the fervor of persecution. Although she has done nothing “wrong,” her innocence doesn’t matter. She has drawn the marked paper—she has herself become marked—and according to the logic of the lottery, she therefore must die.
Tessie’s death is an extreme example of how societies can persecute innocent people for absurd reasons. Present-day parallels are easy to draw, because all prejudices, whether they are based on race, sex, appearance, religion, economic class, geographical region, family background, or sexual orientation, are essentially random. Those who are persecuted become “marked” because of a trait or characteristic that is out of their control—for example, they are the “wrong” sex or from the “wrong” part of the country. Just as the villagers in “The Lottery” blindly follow tradition and kill Tessie because that is what they are expected to do, people in real life often persecute others without questioning why. As Jackson suggests, any such persecution is essentially random, which is why Tessie’s bizarre death is so universal.
THEME
DO NOW
GET OUT YOUR ESSAYS, AND COPY OF "THE LOTTERY."
WRITE AN OBJECTIVE SUMMARY OF THE LOTTERY
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