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Some Powerful Ideas About Teaching and Learning

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Mike Seignior

on 5 February 2014

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Transcript of Some Powerful Ideas About Teaching and Learning

Anderson's Revision of Bloom's Taxonomy RBT (2001)
Pre-structural -
Uni-structural -
Multi-structural -
Relational -
Extended abstract -
Concious
Unconcious
Competence
Incompetence
Concious
Competence
Unconcious
Competence
Unconcious
Incompetence
Concious
Incompetence
feeling and watching
Divergent
Accommodative
Convergent
Assimilative
PG Cert HE
Teaching & Supporting Learning

To have a walk around some major ideas of teaching and learning
Discuss how the ideas effect our understanding of what is happening in the act of teaching and learning
To explore the interconnection or contradictions between these theories
To consider how the application of different throries might effect the student experience and assist with student diversity.
Last Time.........
Surface
Deep
Strategic
Honey & Mumfords
Learning Styles
Forming
Storming
Norming
Peforming
Adjourning
Chairman
able to get others working to
a shared aim; confident, mature

Shaper
energetic, achievement-driven, assertive, competitive

Plant
innovative, inventive, problem-solving, unorthodox

Monitor-Evaluator
serious, prudent, critical thinker

Company Worker
systematic, common sense,
structured, reliable, practicable,

Resource Investigator
communicator, networker, seeks and finds options, negotiator

Team Worker
supportive, sociable, flexible,
adaptable, listener, mediator

Completer-Finishe
r
attention to detail, accurate, delivers to schedule and specification

The
Team

watching and thinking
doing and thinking
doing and feeling
vak learning styles
Benjamin Bloom's
Taxonomy of Learning Domains (1956)
Bruce Tuckman's
Stages in Team development
Cognitive domain (intellectual capability, ie., knowledge, or 'think')

Affective domain (feelings, emotions and behaviour, ie., attitude, or 'feel')

Psychomotor domain (manual and physical skills, ie., skills, or 'do')
VARK (Visual-Auditory-Reading-Kinesthetic)
or
VACT (Visual-Auditory-Kinesthetic-Tactile)
Kinesthetic Learners:
learn through , moving, doing and touching...
Auditory Learners:
learn through listening...
Visual Learners:
learn through seeing... .
Biggs'
Structure of the Observed Learning Outcomes
(SOLO) taxonomy
Maslow's
Hierarchy of needs
Problem Based
Learning
The conscious competence learning model
Constructive Alignment
Lunchtime

Back at
13.00pm
Coffee Time
25mins max
Do a learning styles
test over coffee
A student is not aware of the existence or relevance of a skill area or their deficiency in it
A student may deny the relevance or usefulness of the new skill
A student must become conscious of their incompetence before development of the new skill or learning can begin
A student becomes aware of the existence & relevance of the skill and what level the skill is required to become competant.
A student can guage their deficiency in this area by attempting or trying to use the skill
A student realises that by improving their skill or ability in this area their effectiveness will improve
A student is motivated to make a commitment to learn and practice the new skill, and to move to the next stage
A student can perform a skill at the pre-defined competent level
A student can perform the skill without assistance but needs to concentrate and think about doing it
A student will need lots of practise of the new skill in order to perform it automatically or unconciously
A student becomes so practised that the skill becomes 'second nature' - common examples are driving, sports activities, typing, manual dexterity tasks,
A student can perform or integrate the skill with other skills
A student is able to explain the skill and teach it to others.
Sometimes after some time of being unconsciously competent a person might actually have difficulty in explaining exactly how they do it - the skill has become largely instinctual
Belbin's Team Roles
Remembering
Understanding
Applying
Analysing
Evaluating
Creating
(Anderson & Krathwohl,
2001, pp. 67-68)
Howard Gardners Multiple
Intelligences
Cognitive
knowledge
1. Recall data
2. Understand
3. Apply (use)
4. Analyse (structure/elements)
5. Synthesize (create/build)
6. Evaluate (assess, judge in relational terms)
Affective
attitude
1. Receive (awareness)
2. Respond (react)
3. Value (understand and act)
4. Organise personal value system
5. Internalize value system (adopt behaviour)
Psychomotor
skills
1. Imitation (copy)
2. Manipulation (follow instructions)
3. Develop Precision
4. Articulation (integrate related skills)
5. Naturalization (automate, become expert)
Think of something that you learnt deeply so that you have a deep understanding of how it works...........
Can you think of how your learnt this thing so deeply?
Was it the teacher?
Was it the process?
What was it?
Briefly discus it with your neighbour............. 2 mins
Biggs SOLO Taxonomy
The need to know

— adult learners need to know why they need to learn something before undertaking to learn it.
L
earner self-concept

adults need to be responsible for their own decisions and to be treated as capable of self-directionR
o
le of learners' experience —

adult learners have experience of life which represent the richest resource for learning. These experiences are imbued with bias and presupposition.Re
a
diness to learn —
a
dults are ready to learn those things they need to know in order to cope effectively with life situations.Ori
e
ntation to learning —ad
u
lts are motivated to learn to the extent that they perceive that it will help them perform tasks they confront in their life

Malcolm Knowles'
Theory of Andragogy

Social/situated learning
Bandura, Lave & Wenger, Tennant
Learning through observation
Learning through modelling
Learning through practice and rehearsal
Learning in the social context of a discipline
Learning within a community og practice
intelligence type capability and perception
Linguistic words and language
Logical-Mathematical logic and numbers
Musical music, sound, rhythm
Bodily-Kinesthetic body movement control
Spatial-Visualimages and space
Interpersonal other people's feelings
Intrapersonalself-awareness

Howard Gardner's
Are you a naturally deep learner?
Or do you have to work at it?
LED4001 - Workshop 3
Pre-structural -
Uni-structural -
Multi-structural -
Relational -
Extended abstract -
Unconcious
Incompetence
Concious
Competence
Unconcious
Competence
Concious
Incompetence
Biggs SOLO Taxonomy
The domain:
A community of practice is not merely a club of friends or a network of connections between people. It has an identity defined by a shared domain of interest.

The community:
In pursuing their interest in their domain, members engage in joint activities and discussions, help each other, and share information. They build relationships that enable them to learn from each other.

The practice:
A community of practice is not merely a community of interest–people who like certain kinds of movies, for instance. Members of a community of practice are practitioners. They develop a shared repertoire of resources: experiences, stories, tools, ways of addressing recurring problems—in short a shared practice.

http://wenger-trayner.com/theory/

Communities of Practice
Full transcript