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Consumer Market Expertise New

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sandra karlsson

on 23 January 2014

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Transcript of Consumer Market Expertise New

Trend watching 2014
Additional trends 2014: Made greener by/for China, Global brain, Mychiatry
Consumer marketing - The classics
Today's Agenda

BREAK
The Disciplinary Status of Consumer Behavior: A Sociology of Science Perspective on Key Controversies
- Macinnis, D.J. & Folkes V.S.
Question 1
: Is Consumer Behavior an independent discipline?

Question 2
: What is and what is not Consumer Behavior?

Question 3
: Should the field of Consumer Behavior be
interdisciplinary?

Question 1
: Is Consumer Behavior an independent discipline?

Answer
: No, Consumer Behavior is not an independent discipline. It is rather a sub-discipline within the marketing field.

Question 2
: What is and what is not Consumer Behavior?

Answer
: Consumer Behavior is distinguished from other fields by its focus on the
consumer
.

Culturally Constituted World
Advertising / Fashion
System
Question 3
: Should the field of Consumer Behavior be interdisciplinary?

Answer
: No, Consumer Behavior is multidisciplinary.

Fashion System
Consumer Goods
The Experiential Aspects of Consumption: Consumer Fantasies, Feelings, and Fun
Author(s): Morris B. Holbrook and Elizabeth C. Hirschman
Journal of Consumer Research, Vol. 9, No. 2 (Sep., 1982), pp. 132-140
The experiential Aspects of Consumption: Consumer Fantasies, Feelings, and Fun
Classical decision theory "information processing model" (Bettman, 1979)

Experiential view: emotions, fantasies, fun, symbolic meaning, esthetic criteria etc.


The Experiential Aspects of Consumption: Consumer Fantasies, Feelings, and Fun
Author(s): Morris B. Holbrook and Elizabeth C. Hirschman
Journal of Consumer Research, Vol. 9, No. 2 (Sep., 1982), pp. 132-140
The Experiential Aspects of Consumption: Consumer Fantasies, Feelings, and Fun
Author(s): Morris B. Holbrook and Elizabeth C. Hirschman
Journal of Consumer Research, Vol. 9, No. 2 (Sep., 1982), pp. 132-140
"...esthetic products, multisensory aspects of product enjoyment, syntactic dimensions of communication, time budgeting in the pursuit of pleasure, product-related fantasies and imagery, feelings arising from consumption, and the role of play in providing enjoyment and fun."
From economic to uneconomic man

"Want" is stronger than "need"

The symbolic meaning of things
Information processing model versus experiential view:

-
Task definition
(problem solving/hedonic response)

-
Behavior
(buying decision/overall consumption experience)

-
Output
(function/ fun; result/enjoyment; purpose/pleasure)

-
Cognition
(memory/subconcious; beliefs/fantasies)

-
Affect
(attitude/emotions; preferences/feelings)

-
Learning
(satsifaction/associations)


Submitted Questions
Thank you!
Symbols for Sale
- Sidney J. Levy (1959)
Individual Consumer
Possession
Ritual
Exchange
Ritual
Grooming
Ritual
Divestment
Ritual
Culture and Consumption: A Theoretical Account of the Structure: A Theoretical Account of the Structure and Movement of the Cultural Meaning of Consumer
Author(s): McCracken (1986)
Journal of Consumer Research, 13(1), p71-84
Movement of Meaning
Location of Meaning
Instrument of Meaning Transfer
Cultural categories are the conceptual grid.
Presentation of the articles
The Disciplinary Status of Consumer Behavior: A Sociology of Science Perspective on Key Controversies.
Symbols for Sale
The Experiential Aspects of Consumption
A Theoretical Account of the Structure and Movement of the Cultural Meaning of Consumer Goods

Break

Class discussion
Submitted questions
Empirical study
They determine how this world will be seperated into intelligible parcels.
The Disciplinary Status of Consumer Behavior: A Sociology of Science Perspective on Key Controversies.
Author(s):
Macinnis, D.J. & Folkes V.S. Journal of Consumer Research, 36 (April, 2009), pp. 899-914.


The Disciplinary Status of Consumer Behavior: A Sociology of Science Perspective on Key Controversies.
Author(s):
Macinnis, D.J. & Folkes V.S. Journal of Consumer Research, 36 (April, 2009), pp. 899-914.


The Disciplinary Status of Consumer Behavior: A Sociology of Science Perspective on Key Controversies.
Author(s):
Macinnis, D.J. & Folkes V.S. Journal of Consumer Research, 36 (April, 2009), pp. 899-914.


The Disciplinary Status of Consumer Behavior: A Sociology of Science Perspective on Key Controversies.
Author(s):
Macinnis, D.J. & Folkes V.S. Journal of Consumer Research, 36 (April, 2009), pp. 899-914.


Sidney J. Levy (1959), “Symbols for Sale” Harvard Business Review (July-August): 117-124.
Culture and Consumption: A Theoretical Account of the Structure: A Theoretical Account of the Structure and Movement of the Cultural Meaning of Consumer
Author(s): McCracken (1986)
Journal of Consumer Research, 13(1), p71-84
Every person carries several parcels.
Guilt-free status

Crowd shaped

No data

The internet of caring things

Other trends?




Trend Watching 2014
Additional trends: Made greener by/for China, Mychiarity and Global Brain
Culture and Consumption: A Theoretical Account of the Structure: A Theoretical Account of the Structure and Movement of the Cultural Meaning of Consumer
Author(s): McCracken (1986)
Journal of Consumer Research, 13(1), p71-84
Buzz Question
Do you believe there is a credibility issue if, for instance, a
psychologist
publishes an article in a
marketing
journal?
Buzz Question
Product: goods and services versus entertainment, art, leisure
Resources: money versus time
Individual: lifestyle versus personality
The disadvantage of the experiential approach has traditionally been that it is difficult to measure (e.g. define lifestyle versus define personality)

What do you see as the main possibilities for experiential marketing? Give examples of experiential marketing experiences/methods.
Enhancing Self image
Firms not only sell goods - they also sell symbols.
Symbols give life and meaning to products and become a part of individual identities.
Marketers must understand that the objects they sell not only satisfies the practical needs but also the need to fit in a societal and cultural context.
Sidney J. Levy (1959), “Symbols for Sale” Harvard Business Review (July-August): 117-124.
Sidney J. Levy (1959), “Symbols for Sale” Harvard Business Review (July-August): 117-124.
Buzz Question
Conspicous consumption with luxury goods may serve as symbols expressing success. According to trendwatch, guilt-free consumption will be the next trend which is quite the opposite. How will this affect the luxury goods market? Can you think of new symbols that will express success?
Parcels are made substanstial or reflected by goods.
Culture and Consumption: A Theoretical Account of the Structure: A Theoretical Account of the Structure and Movement of the Cultural Meaning of Consumer
Author(s): McCracken (1986)
Journal of Consumer Research, 13(1), p71-84
The Theoretical Account of the Structure and Movement of the Cultural Meaning of Consumer
Culturally Constituted World
Advertising / Fashion
System
Fashion System
Consumer Goods
Individual Consumer
Possession
Ritual
Exchange
Ritual
Grooming
Ritual
Divestment
Ritual
Movement of Meaning
Location of Meaning
Instrument of Meaning Transfer
Buzz Question
1. Do those rituals differ among different cultures?

2. How could the model be applied to real world marketing practices?
Why is it important that the manufacturers understand that beside the products they are also selling symbols?


What more than advertising and the fashion system can transfer meaning of goods? Is that categorization still relevant today?
The authors argue for the introduction of the experiential view to the traditional information processing perspective on consumer behavior. In your opinion, are the two perspectives equally applicable to different kinds of products or buying situations? Are there Products/situations where one of the perspectives is more applicable?
The authors discuss that by seeing consumer behavior as a subdiscipline of marketing it restrains the possibilities for research. Do you share this view or do you see benefits from this?
Full transcript