Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Gender Roles

No description
by

Ruth Cuenco

on 12 May 2010

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Gender Roles

Thesis
To explore a matrilineal/patriarchal society's views on gender roles through the values, aspirations, and expectations of parents and their children.
Definiton
Gender Roles:
A set of expectations that prescribes how females and males should think, act, and feel. (Santrock, 2008)
Background
A View on Aspirations
Palauan
Filipino
Palau is a matrilineal society, but it is not matriarchal. Men still hold leadership positions and are head of the households. However, women are still highly respected and play important roles such as choosing chiefs. (Remengesau, 1987)
Philippines
is this
Philippines is a patriarchal society that shares kinship bilaterally. Although Filipino women share more equality as compared to other South-East Asian nations, Filipino women still struggle to gain the same respect men have. (Clamonte, n.d. & U.S. Library of Congress, n.d.)
Hypothesis
Based on our research, we expect that Palauan parents will expect more from their daughters and will want a more prestigious career for them because their culture give high regard to their females. On the otherhand, we expect Filipino parents to have higher standards for their sons because of their patriarchal traditions.
Difference of gender roles between Palauan and Filipino cultures
Parents' influence on their adolescents on gender roles
Interviews
MALE
Boss
Military
Professional Musician
Business
Accounting
Teacher (P.E./Health)
Medical
Driver
Filipino
FEMALE
Model
Movie star
Nurse
Stay at home mom
Fashion designer
Military
Stewardess
Teacher (Art)
MALE
Military
Seaman
Doctor
Engineer
Architect
Lawyer
Accountant
Business
Detective
FEMALE
Marketing
Pilot
Scientist
Writer
Nurse
Teacher
Doctor
Pediatrician
Professional
athlete
Palauan
The Great Expectation
Participants
28 individuals
~ 18 Filipinos
~ 10 Palauans
In early colonial United States, only________ can pursue a higher education.
During Medieval times, ____________ weren't allowed to marry without their parent’s consent.
In Muslim nations, ____________ are banned from smoking.
In Russia, __________ were reported to be suicide bombers.
In Palau, __________ owned land.
India has more ________ doctors, surgeons, scientists, and professors than the United States.
On average, _______are socially, politically and economically stronger than_________ in India.
Palauan
Son
Complete education
Be a certified public accountant
Be a director
Be in the medical field
Be an engineer
Be a lawyer
Be an architect
Choose any career
Daughter
Continue school
Support the family
Join the military
Be a doctor
Explore different careers
Daughter
Finish college
Get good grades
Have a good job
Get married
Be a doctor
Be a nurse
Join the military as a nurse
Choose any career
Son
Finish college
Have a good job
Have a good family
Be a straight A student
Be law-abiding
Be a teacher
Choose any career
Filipino
Beliefs on Gender Roles
PARENTS
Men should work and provide for the family, and women should stay home to take care of the children and clean.
Men should have good wisdom and integrity and work to provide for the family. Women should stay home, but because of the economy, they should work too.
Men and women are the same; both should work.
Men should work, and women should stay home. But if a woman has to work, the man should stay home.
Men should be the head of the household and provide for the family, and women should take care of the children.
CHILDREN
Men should work and provide for the family, and women should nurture and take care of the children.
Men and women should have the freedom to do what they want to do.
Men and Women should work and provide income.
If they wanted to stay home, they can
Men and women should do whatever they want
Both men and women should work, but women should stay home if possible.
Palauan
PARENTS
Men and women have different strengths and should compliment each other.
Men and women should be equal, especially in doing house chores.
Man should work, while a woman should stay home.
In a traditional Filipino family, the father is the head of the household and goes out to work, and the mother takes care of the children. However, women can also do a man’s work, such as yard work.
Men and women should decide what they are supposed to do and not follow other people’s ideas on gender roles.
The man is the head of the family and should be the bread winner, while the women takes care of the children, prepare food, and be a good house wife.
Filipino
CHILDREN:
Girls can do whatever they want, but men should be the bread winner or take turns.
A man should do what a woman does.
Men should swap roles with women and vice versa.
It is acceptable for a man to switch roles with a woman.
Men should work and provide for their family, and women should take care of the children and not work.
Men and women are becoming more equal.
It's not what someone can't do, it's what they are able and willing to do that matters, so men and women can be equal.

CONCLUSION:
Our interviews disproved our hypothesis. The two cultures share very similar beliefS on gender roles. Both Palauan and Filipino Parents want their children to pursue a higher education, land a good job, and be successful—both for their sons and daughters.
matrilineal: inheriting or determining descent through the female line.
patriarchal: social organization marked by the supremacy of the father in the clan or family.
ReferenceS
Santrock, J. W. (2008). Adolescence (12th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw Hill.
The role and status of women. (n.d.) In U.S. Library of Congress. Retrieved from
http://countrystudies.us/philippines/44.htm.
Clamonte, Nitz. (n.d). Women in the Philippines. Retrieved from
http://web.archive.org/web/20070928212730/http://www.ozamiz.com/earthcalls/
women.html.
matrilineal. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged. Retrieved April 18, 2010, from Dictionary.com
website: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/matrilineal
patriarchy. (2010). In Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary. Retrieved April 18, 2010, from
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/patriarchy
Teaiwa, T.K. (1992). Microwomen: U.S. colonialism and Micronesian Women activists. Papers
from the 8th pacific History Association conference. Mangilao, GU: Univ. of Guam Press.
Remengesau, F. K. (1987). The emergence and challenge of Palauan women in Micronesia.
GAME:
Women in India. (n.d.). Retrieved from
http://www.indiaonestop.com/womenindia.htm
Blood, P. R., ed. (2001). Gender Roles. Retrieved from
http://countrystudies.us/afghanistan/index.htm
Clark-Flory, T. (2010). Women as terrorist weapons in
Russia. Retrieved from http://www.salon.com/life/
broadsheet/2010/03/29/russia_female_suicide_
bombers/index.html
Medieval Women. (n.d.). Retrieved from
http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/medieval_
women.htm
Do People Have a Right to Smoke? (2010). Retrieved
from http://www.themuslimwoman.org/entry/do-
people-have-a-right-to-smoke/
Cheek, K. (n.d.). Schooling, education, and literacy in
colonial America. Retrieved from http://faculty.mdc.
edu/jmcnair/Joe28pages/Schooling,%20Education,
%20and%20Literacy%20in%20Colonial%20America.htm.
Source: Dictionary.com & Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary
Questions?
THANK YOU!
Presented by:
Patrick Borja
Grace Cuenco
Mark Ganeb
Rema Olaguera

Adolescents' actual aspirations:
Male
Be an architect
Be a photographer
Have a business
Be an accountant
Be a detective
Be a lawyer
Female
Be a nurse
Be a teacher
Be a doctor
Parents' hope for their children:
Male
Join the military
be a professional musician
Own a business
Be an accountant
Be a health/PE teacher
Be in the medical field
Be in the law enforcement
Female
Be a fashion designer
Join the military
Be a chef
Be a stewardess
Be an art teacher
Adolescents' actual aspirations
Parents' hope for their children
Full transcript