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inference vs. prediction

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by

Amy Duchac

on 14 June 2016

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Transcript of inference vs. prediction

Are they the same?
Prediction vs. Inference
they are not the same.
Although prediction and
inference are both
comprehension strategies....
Prediction
You use the TEXT to do this (title, pictures, words etc.).
...are asking yourself questions about what you think might happen next OR what the text is about.
Inference
you use the TEXT and your BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGE to do this.
...are asking yourself questions
to figure something out or to reach a conclusion.
...are NOT always able to confirm your thinking by the end of the text.
When you make a prediction you.....
....are able to confirm your thinking
by the end of the story.
SO........
Help students to understand the difference between inference and prediction by teaching them
why
they use these strategies AND help them to recognize
when
they are using them

.
Predictions are made
before you read
or
while you are reading.
When you make an
inference, you.....
Inferences are made
while you are reading.
Why do we make predictions?
1. Inferences help the reader to understand things the author wants
them to know but does not directly state in the story.
2. Inferences help the reader to understand characters, what they may have done in the past and what they may do next.
Why do we make inferences?
1. Making and confirming predictions helps the reader better understand what happens in a story.
3. Inferences help students draw logical conclusions about what is happening in the story.
Make sure you are clear and concise when talking about each strategy.
Questions
and
discussion
Full transcript