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Copy of Buddhism Graphic Organizer

Four Noble Truths Eightfold Path Buddha Five Precepts
by

Andrew Simpson

on 19 January 2015

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Transcript of Copy of Buddhism Graphic Organizer

Buddhism
Graphic Organizer
Eightfold Path
Buddha and the 5 Precepts
2. Do not steal
4. Do not lie
Origin of Buddha
It is a respect to other's properties and the right to own property. If something is not given, one may not take it away by stealing, by force or by fraud.
To refrain from telling lies is to show respect for the truth.
Siddhartha Gautama was born in approximately 560 B.C. in northern India. His father Suddhodana was the ruler over a district near the Himalayas which is today the country of Nepal. Suddhodana sheltered his son from the outside world and confined him to the palace where he surrounded Gautama with pleasures and wealth. Despite his father's efforts, Gautama one day saw the darker side of life on a trip he took outside the palace walls.
He saw four things that forever changed his life: an old man, a sick man, a dead man, and a beggar. Deeply distressed by the suffering he saw, he decided to leave the luxury of palace life and begin a quest to find the answer to the problem of pain and human suffering.
Gautama left his family and traveled the country seeking wisdom. He studied the Hindu scriptures under Brahmin priests, but became disillusioned with the teachings of Hinduism. He then devoted himself to a life of extreme asceticism in the jungle. Legend has it that he eventually learned to exist on one grain of rice a day which reduced his body to a skeleton. He soon concluded, however, that asceticism did not lead to peace and self realization but merely weakened the mind and body.Gautama eventually turned to a life of meditation. While deep in meditation under a fig tree known as the Bohdi tree (meaning, "tree of wisdom"), Gautama experienced the highest degree of God-consciousness called Nirvana. Gautama then became known as Buddha, the "enlightened one." He believed he had found the answers to the questions of pain and suffering. His message now needed to be proclaimed to the whole world.
Right Mindfulness
It is the mental ability to see things as they are, with clear consciousness.
Right Livelihood
one should earn one's living in a righteous way and that wealth should be gained legally and peacefully.
Right Effort
Without effort, which is in itself an act of will, nothing can be achieved, whereas misguided effort distracts the mind from its task, and confusion will be the consequence.
Right View
To see and understand things as they really are
The Third Noble Truth
3. The cessation of suffering is attainable.
The cessation of suffering can be attained through nirodha. Nirodha means the unmaking of sensual craving and conceptual attachment.
The Second Noble Truth
The first noble truth
1. Life means suffering.
To live means to suffer, because the human nature is not perfect and neither is the world we live in.
The Four Noble Truths
Right Intention
Right Speech
Right Action
Right Concentration
volitional aspect, i.e. the kind of mental energy that controls our actions.
is not self-sufficient, however, essential, because mental purification can only be achieved through the cultivation of ethical conduct.
involves the body as natural means of expression, as it refers to deeds that involve bodily actions.
one-pointedness of mind, meaning a state where all mental faculties are unified and directed onto one particular object.
1. Do not kill
One must not deliberately kill any living creatures, either by committing the act oneself, instructing others to kill, or approving of or participating in act of killing. It is a respect to others' lives.
3. Do not Indulge in Sexual Misconduct
Though the moral standards are different in different countries and in different times, rape, adultery and other abnormal sexual behaviour that involve physical and mental injury to others should be prohibited.
2. The origin of suffering is attachment.
The origin of suffering is attachment to transient things and the ignorance thereof.
The Fourth Noble Truth
4. The path to the cessation of suffering.
There is a path to the end of suffering - a gradual path of self-improvement, which is described more detailed in the Eightfold Path. It is the middle way between the two extremes of excessive self-indulgence (hedonism) and excessive self-mortification (asceticism); and it leads to the end of the cycle of rebirth.
He's attached to his blanket.
5. Do not take intoxicants
Taking intoxicant will descend and lose the seed of wisdom. Intoxicants, such as drugs, liquor, smoking, etc., are harmful to health. It seems that taking intoxicant is not hurting others.
For Monks & Nuns:
I undertake to observe the precept to abstain from ...
...taking untimely meals.
...dancing, singing, music and watching grotesque mime.
...use of garlands, perfumes and personal adornment.
...use of high seats and comfy beds.
...accepting gold or silver.

Purpose of Buddhism:
1) To reduce and ultimately end Dukkha
2) To reach enlightenment and enter Nibbana
Both are possible by following the teachings of the Buddha, following the Eightfold Path and the five/ten precepts.

SAMSARA:
CYCLE OF BIRTH, DEATH & REBIRTH
NEVER ENDING AND POINTLESS
FULL OF SUFFERING, NEVER SATISFIED
FUELED BY THE THREE POISONS
GREED - COCKEREL
HATRED - SNAKE
IGNORANCE - PIG


Samsara is affected by our kammic actions
SKILFUL - WISE
UNSKILFUL - IGNORANT
QUOTE: I have passed in ignorance through a cycle of
many rebirths, seeking the builder of the house. Continuous rebirth is a painful thing. But now, house builder, I have found you out. You will not build me a house again. All your rafters are broken, your ridge-pole shattered. My mind is free from active thought, and has made an end of craving. Dhammapada153, 154

Why is Samsara a better goal?
Nibbana for many Buddhists is a distant goal taking many lifetimes to achieve.
Making progress through Samsara by following the precepts and the eightfold path is much more manageable if they are not a monk or nun (Meditation, study and worship all take a lot of time and lay Buddhists can’t always devote themselves to their ‘practice.’
You are responsible for your own Kamma and you can control this allowing you to make progress…

Nibbana:
The ultimate GOAL for Buddhists.
However, for the majority of Buddhists who are not monks
(Theravada) or monks and nuns (Mahayana) the goal is distant – their goal is accumulate positive kamma through skilful means.
Craving is brought to an end by the flames of hatred, greed and ignorance being extinguished.
No beginning or end and is NOT dependent on anything.
NOT a place but a state of mind.

Buddhist fable – the turtle tries to describe
to the fish what dry land is like but fails
because the fish cannot comprehend
anything beyond its own experience.
Therefore the fish doubts whether dry
land actually exists…
Nibbana is often referred to in the Dhamma by what it is not rather than by what it is...
Nagasena explains that Nibbana can only be understood by experiencing it by oneself.

Nagasena compares Nibbana to the wind.
Wind cannot be seen or touched.
Wind can be experienced and you can see the effects of the wind.

Dhammapada 90. ‘The fever of passion exists not for him who has completed the journey, who is sorrowless and wholly set free, and has broken all ties.’

Dhammapada 91. ‘The mindful ones exert themselves. They are not attached to any home; like swans that abandon the lake, they leave home after home behind.’

Theravada view of Nibbana:
FOLLOW THE DHAMMA
INDIVIDUAL EFFORT
MANY LIFETIMES TO ACHIEVE
MONKS ARE THE ONLY ONES FOR WHO IT IS POSSIBLE
FOUR STAGES
sotapanna - stream entrants
sakadagami - once returned
anagami - non returner
arhat - worthy of respect
FOCUS IS ON SKILFUL MEANS
ACHIEVED BY FOLLOWING THE EIGHTFOLD PATH LAYBUDDHISTS CAN ONLY HOPE FOR BETTER NEXT REBIRTH
ACHIEVED BY ACCUMULATING POSITIVE KAMMA

Mahayana view of Nibbana:
BODHISATTVA - being of enlightenment
THE WAY TO NIBBANA
helping others achieve Nibbana
POSSIBLE FOR ALL TO ACHIEVE
PURE LAND
people need help to achieve enlightenment
Amithaba Buddha - created a 'Pure Land'
From the Pure Land it is easier to achieve enlightenment
TIBETAN BUDDHISM
Everyone has a 'Buddha Nature.'
All humans should make the most of their human birth
Human birth is rare and should be used wisely
Aim to make spiritual progress in your lifetime
If possible achieve Nibbana

The Eightfold Path can be divided into three groups of linked
practices:
WISDOM
MORALITY
MEDITATION
It is part of the Dhamma.

Knowledge of the Eightfold Path is not enough to attain Nibbana
— it MUST be applied leading to changing attitudes and
behaviour: MUST be 'practiced'.

The Eightfold Path is made up of eight different aspects. These
help Buddhists develop a compassionate approach to existence
and help them realise the true nature of life.
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