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Language and community: Further oral activity

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Amanda Helms

on 24 November 2014

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Transcript of Language and community: Further oral activity

Emma Watson's HeForShe Speech
Summary
- FEMINISM = NOT shameful
- Rights that have not yet been reached by the world, such as salary issues, freedom of speech, and education
- Gender inequality is not JUST women, but men as well
Structure: Intro
Context
- HeForShe Campaign: Gender equality solidarity movement.
- Emma Watson: UN Women Global Goodwill Ambassador
- Purpose of campaign is to bring one half of the community to support the the other half
- Speech was at HeForShe Special Event at UN Headquarters in New York on September 20th, 2014

Language and community: Further oral activity
Thesis: in Emma Watson’s United Nations speech for the 2014 HeForShe campaign, she uses her public figure status as a medium to inspire and persuade both men and women to fight for gender equality, and uses language to show her passion for the rights of the women’s community, while including the men’s community as well. Throughout her speech, she incorporates notable structural features and various stylistic devices to reveal that feminism should not be shameful, and that gender inequality also affects men as they play a role in the rights of the women’s community.
Learning outcome: how audience and purpose affect the structure and content of text
Stylistic Devices: Detail + Irony
Today we are launching a campaign called “HeForShe.”
I am reaching out to you because I need your help. We want to end gender inequality—and to do that we need everyone to be involved.
This is the first campaign of its kind at the UN: we want to try and galvanize as many men and boys as possible to be advocates for gender equality. And we don’t just want to talk about it, but make sure it is tangible...
Feminism by definition is: “The belief that men and women should have equal rights and opportunities.
to the point; context
purpose and reason she is here
Diction is strong and demanding
Defines Feminism
Structure: Timeline
...when at eight I was confused at being called “bossy,” because I wanted to direct the plays we would put on for our parents—but the boys were not.
When at 14 I started being sexualized by certain elements of the press.
When at 15 my girlfriends started dropping out of their sports teams because they didn’t want to appear “muscly.”
When at 18 my male friends were unable to express their feelings.

Begins with a timeline of her past:

The continuous signs of the fear and disfavor of feminism shows how it dates from a decade ago to the present, and hasn't improved -> enhancing purpose
Structure: Timeline
Because to date, I’ve seen my father’s role as a parent being valued less by society despite my needing his presence as a child as much as my mother’s...

If we do nothing it will take 75 years, or for me to be nearly a hundred before women can expect to be paid the same as men for the same work. 15.5 million girls will be married in the next 16 years as children. And at current rates it won’t be until 2086 before all rural African girls will be able to receive a secondary education.

The present: still no improvement
The possible future, IF nothing is done
Structure: Three Simple Rights
[I] think it is right that as a woman I am paid the same as my male counterparts. I think it is right that I should be able to make decisions about my own body. I think it is right that women be involved on my behalf in the policies and decision-making of my country. I think it is right that socially I am afforded the same respect as men...


If we do nothing it will take 75 years, or for me to be nearly a hundred before women can expect to be paid the same as men for the same work. 15.5 million girls will be married in the next 16 years as children. And at current rates it won’t be until 2086 before all rural African girls will be able to receive a secondary education.
Has three main rights that she believes are most important, and repeats them once in the beginning, and once in the end
(1) Salaries are different
(2) Rights over body
(3) Education
I started questioning gender-based assumptions when at eight I was confused at being called “bossy,” because I wanted to direct the plays we would put on for our parents—but the boys were not.
When at 14 I started being sexualized by certain elements of the press.
When at 15 my girlfriends started dropping out of their sports teams because they didn’t want to appear “muscly.”
When at 18 my male friends were unable to express their feelings.
I decided I was a feminist and this seemed uncomplicated to me. But my recent research has shown me that feminism has become an unpopular word.
Apparently I am among the ranks of women whose expressions are seen as too strong,
too aggressive, isolating, anti-men and, unattractive.
Detail:Abhorring language/detail that is currently used to describe the feminist community
Diction: Enhances irony
Irony: Emma Watson, who is considered as a sex symbol is calling herself "unattractive" by the means of society because she is a part of the feminist community
Stylistic Devices: Anaphora
When at eight I was confused at being called “bossy,” because I wanted to direct the plays we would put on for our parents—but the boys were not.
When at 14 I started being sexualized by certain elements of the press.
When at 15 my girlfriends started dropping out of their sports teams because they didn’t want to appear “muscly.”
When at 18 my male friends were unable to express their feelings.


Stylistic Devices: Inclusive Language + Detail

Men—I would like to take this opportunity to extend your formal invitation. Gender equality is your issue too... I’ve seen my father’s role as a parent being valued less by society...I’ve seen young men suffering from mental illness unable to ask for help for fear it would make them look less of a man...I’ve seen men made fragile and insecure by a distorted sense of what constitutes male success. Men don’t have the benefits of equality either... I can see that when they [men] are free, things will change for women as a natural consequence.
If men don’t have to be aggressive in order to be accepted women won’t feel compelled to be submissive. If men don’t have to control, women won’t have to be controlled.
Both men and women should feel free to be sensitive. Both men and women should feel free to be strong…
"When at..." :
Her personal timeline of how she has experienced feminism first hand -> Gives her credibility and sympathy (ETHOS)
Stylistic Devices: ETHOS
I started questioning gender-based assumptions when at eight I was confused at being called “bossy,” because I wanted to direct the plays we would put on for our parents—but the boys were not.
When at 14 I started being sexualized by certain elements of the press.
When at 15 my girlfriends started dropping out of their sports teams because they didn’t want to appear “muscly.”
When at 18 my male friends were unable to express their feelings.

I’ve seen my father’s role as a parent being valued less by society despite my needing his presence as a child as much as my mother’s.
I’ve seen young men suffering from mental illness unable to ask for help for fear it would make them look less of a man... I’ve seen men made fragile and insecure by a distorted sense of what constitutes male success.

By relating to personal experiences, she gives herself credibility because she has experienced these problems first hand. Nobody can doubt her own experiences, but only trust them.
She relates to not only herself, but family and friends. Not a random person she doesn't know. -> Emotional impact on the audience
Inclusive language: Talking directly to men so they listen, and they are involved. Not just women.
Uses detail to show how gender inequality is impacting men.
Example
Thesis
1. Introduction


2. Timeline


3. Three Rights
Example
Thesis
1. Detail + Irony


2. ETHOS


3. Anaphora

4. Inclusive Language +Detail
Clear and concise with demanding language; engaging the audience and showing she is not just a celebrity preacher, but one with purpose.
To show how, throughout her life, Emma Watson has not seen any improvements. Then portrays how the future can be if no action is taken place to paint a picture of how change needs to happen.
In the beginning, she lists the three rights she thinks are most important. She then repeats them, but in a different format to remind the audience about the rights that seem simple, but are not prevalent to make people realize they need to take action.
Has words that are used to describe and criticize feminists to shines light on the unfairness and discrimination against women like Emma Watson, who, ironically, people view as a "sex symbol.'
Has personal connections to show that she has experienced it, thus giving herself credibility; this portrays her as a valuable role model for people to be inspired by, and take action.
Repeats phrases and words to emphasize her points and purpose so the audience understands her determination.
Speaks directly to men to include them and explain that gender inequality is not just a women's issue. Uses detail to explain why it's a man's issue; thus, inspiring men to help the cause.
Conclusion
1. Structure



2. Stylistic Devices
Clear introduction, timeline of prolonged injustices, and focus on three simple rights not respected to ultimately engage and efficiently galvanize audience to support women's/feminist community
Convinces that feminism is not shameful, but worth supporting, reflects her credibility to represent a valuable role model worth agreeing with, and is able to emphasize her points through repetition; meanwhile, including men into the audience to inspire all to support HeForShe.
Repetition of "free"
To emphasize that HeForShe causes freedom, a basic human right; thus, we must take action
...if we stop defining each other by what we are not and start defining ourselves by what we are—we can all be freer and this is what HeForShe is about. It’s about freedom.
I want men to take up this mantle. So their daughters, sisters and mothers can be free from prejudice .
As an effect of men being involved, freedom will occur.
Image:
http://www.hercampus.com/school/c-c/magical-moments-and-wizardly-words-emma-watson-speaks-un-feminism
- She encourages EVERYONE to fight for gender equality and make a change
REMINDS the audience what actions are not being done, and what injustices are prevalent.
Full transcript