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The World's Do's and Taboos

8th Period Kelley AP HUG
by

Vivi K

on 1 November 2013

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Transcript of The World's Do's and Taboos

The World's Do's and Taboos
Chinese Do's and Taboos
Works Cited
"Arabian Body Language." Grapeshisha. GRAPESHISHA, n.d. Web. 30 Oct. 2013.

Axtell, Roger E. Do's and Taboos around the World. New York: Wiley, 1993. Print.

Bloch, Lyudmila. "Top Dining Taboos in Japanese Table Etiquette." World Class Business Etiquette. Etiquette
Outreach, 19 Aug. 2010. Web. 30 Oct. 2013.

"Body Language Around the World." GoBodyLanguage. GoBodyLanguage, n.d. Web. 30 Oct. 2013.

"Body Language of the World: A Traveller's Guide to Avoiding Faux Pas." News.Com.Au. News Limited, 10 Aug.
2011. Web. 30 Oct. 2013.

Boscamp, Emi. "Dining Etiquette From Around The World." The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, 11 July
2013. Web. 30 Oct. 2013.

"El Salvador Dos and Don'ts." Lonely Planet. Lonely Planet, 12 June 2012. Web. 30 Oct. 2013.

Foong, Daw C. "Dos and Don'ts When Doing Business in China." Bakertilly.com. Baker Tilly Virchow Krause, n.d.
Web. 30 Oct. 2013.

"India - Language, Culture, Customs, and Etiquette." Kwintessential. Kwintessential Ltd., n.d. Web. 30 Oct. 2013.

"JAPANESE CUSTOMS, MANNERS AND ETIQUETTE: BOWING, GREETINGS, SLEEPING AND GESTURES." Facts and
Details. Jeffrey Hays, Jan. 2013. Web. 30 Oct. 2013.

Kcatoto. "Dining Etiquette 101." Dining Etiquette 101. Visual.ly, 27 Jan. 2012. Web. 30 Oct. 2013.

Lininger, Mike. "Saudi Arabia." Etiquette Scholar. Etiquette Scholar, n.d. Web. 30 Oct. 2013.

Rugsaken, Kris. "Body-speaks." Clearinghouse. NACADA, n.d. Web. 30 Oct. 2013.

Ruth. "Advice for Women Tourists in the Middle East." Ruth's Jordan Jubilee. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Oct. 2013.

Sinha, Rana. "Cultural Mistakes You Should Avoid in India with Business." Cynthiakocialski.com. Cynthia
Kocialski, 4 Aug. 2011. Web. 30 Oct. 2013.
Latin American Do's and Taboos
Business:
1)
Do
ask about names. In Latin America, surnames are usually a combination of the mother's and father's surname, with the father's name being used to address the person. In Spanish-speaking countries, the father's name comes first, but in Brazil, the mother's comes first.
2)
Do
wear a loose, frilly, white or cream, un-tucked shirt if you are a man. It works for everything except formal occasions.

Japanese Do's and Taboos
Body Language
1)
Do
bow
2)
Don't
make too much eye contact.
3)
Do
make brief eye contact.
Middle Eastern Do's
and Taboos
Indian Do's and Taboos
Khanduri, Shearouse, Willis
8th period Kelley

Business:
1)
Do
address business partners by their first name unless given permission otherwise. Indians are more informal than other Asians and can sometimes seem quite informal.
2)
Don't
buy the same gifts for everyone. Rank and seniority determine the gifts - the higher the rank and older the person, the better gift you must give.
Business:
1)
Don't
wear shoes in mosques.
2) In conservative Arab countries, women can be whacked for dressing immodestly - even in Western-style hotels:
don't
wear shorts, skirts above the knee, sleeveless shirts, low necklines, or revealing swimsuits.
3)
Do
know that family is important, even in business situations, and meetings are held "family style."
Food Situations:
1)
Don't
cross, lick, or stick your chopsticks vertically into a bowl of rice.
2)
Do
slurp soup or noodles to show appreciation to the chef.
3)
Do
drink directly from the soup bowl-- spoons aren't commonly used.
Social Situations:
1)
Don't
be offended when asked uncomfortable questions.
2)
Do
remove your shoes when entering someone's home or a restaurant.
3)
Do
use two hands to offer items to people older than you.
4)
Do
hang lost items up in plain sight.
5)
Don't
cross your arms, make eye contact, or have your hands in your pocket when talking to someone.
6)
Don't
blow your nose in public it is considered rude. Excuse yourself if necessary. Some Japanese respond violently to bad manners.
Business Situations:
1)
Do
ask which name is their given name and which is their surname.
2)
Do
dress formerly, unless at a country inn, they will offer you a kimono.
3)
Don't
assume an affirmative means yes-- they can mean avoiding disappointment.
4)
Don't
assume business ends at the end of the day.
5)
Do
remember family is very important, even in business situations.
Food Situations:
1)
Do
belch and leave a mess on the table, this conveys one satisfaction with their food.
2)
Do
leave a bit of food on your plate.
Social Situations:
1)

Don't

attempt physical contact, such as hugs, at initial greeting.
2)

Do
greet people by Mr./Mrs. and their last name.
3) When in a large group,

do

applaud when someone enters the room.
4)

Don't
open a gift in front of others, to do so is considered greedy.
Business Situations:
1)
Do
ask which name is their given name and which is their surname.
2)
Do
remember that family is very important.
Body Language:
1)
Don't
gesture a lot or move hands excessively.
2)
Don't
whistle or wink, it is considered rude.
3)
Don't
point or use your finger to beckon someone (this gesture is used for dogs). To get someone's attention and tell them to “come here” place your palm down and move your fingers towards you.

Food Situations:
1)
Don't
eat, serve, or take food with your left hand. It is considered unclean in most parts of India. The exception to this would again be urbanized and Westernized areas.
2) Hindus and Sikhs
do not
eat beef, and many are vegetarian.
3) Muslims
do not
eat pork.
4) Due to this, pork and beef are very rarely found in India. Lamb, goat, chicken, and fish are the main meats found there.
Social Situations:
1)
Do
think about the content and context of what you say.
2)
Don't
shout or reprimand in front of peers - it is considered very insulting, and kept within the family.
3)
Do
have intelligent and respectful discussions.
4)
Don't
preach about your beliefs, unless you are participating in a public event for something discussed nationally, such as women's rights. Urban and Westernized areas are more likely to be open to heated discussion on controversial topics, but rural areas tend to be set in their ways.
Body Language:
1)
Don't
touch anyone with your feet or point the soles of your feet at someone. The feet are considered unclean. When sitting cross-legged or on the floor, be careful about how you arrange yourself.
2)
Do
shake hands with people. In some cases, women don't shake hands with men, but in official situations in urban or suburban areas, they do.
Body Language:
1)
Don't
give a thumbs up. In parts of the Middle East, this can be viewed much like the middle finger is in the US and other Western countries.
2)
Do
accept holding hands, even for a long period, especially after shaking hands, as it is common and a sign of friendship.
3)
Do
make eye contact. If an Arab stares you in the eye as you speak, it means that they are giving you their full attention. If they don't, it means that they may not care about what you are saying.
Food Situations:
1)
Do
say certain phrases in relation to meals. In Saudi Arabia, before meals, guests should say, "Sahtain" ("bon appetit"), or "Bismillah" (In the name of God). After the meal is over, guests should also say, "Daimah" (""may there always be plenty at your table").
2)
Don't
forget gender divides. In some Middle Eastern countries, men and women may be asked to dine separately.
Social Situations:
1) Women usually
do not
walk alone, and instead are escorted by men everywhere.
2) Arab women
refuse
to sit next to strange men on any forms of transportation.
3)
Do
tell someone who is annoying you that they are.
4)
Don't
display affection publicly
Body Language:
1)
Do
realize that personal space seems to be practically non-existent in Latin America.
2)
Do
greet good friends with a hug or kiss.
3)
Don't
judge! It is not uncommon to see two people of the same sex walking down the street arm in arm.
Food Situations:
1)
Don't
touch food with your hands. In Chile, and many other Latin American countries, it's considered rude.
Social Situations:
1)
Do
shake hands the first time you meet someone.
2)
Do
bring mementos and souvenirs from where you are from to gift to those who have helped you or invited you to their home.
3)
Don't
look scruffy and unwashed.
4)
Don't
take photos of religious ceremonies or other people without asking first.
5)
Don't
be insulted if people comment on your appearance or give you a nickname realted to it. This is a sign of affection.
Pictures
Full transcript