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Hakuna Matata

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by

Andy Du

on 2 March 2016

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Transcript of Hakuna Matata

*CHORUS*
Hakuna Matata, what a wonderful phrase
Hakuna Matata, ain't no passing craze
It means no worries for the rest of your days
It's our problem free philosophy, Hakuna Matata

Why, when he was a young warthog
When I was a young warthog
Very nice, thanks

He found his aroma lacked a certain appeal
He could clear the Savannah after every meal
I'm a sensitive soul, though I seem thick-skinned
And it hurt that my friends never stood downwind

And oh, the shame, he was ashamed
Thoughta changin' my name, oh, what's in a name?
And I got downhearted, how did you feel? Every time that I
Pumbaa, not in front of the kids, oh sorry

*REPEAT CHORUS*

Hakuna Matata
Hakuna Matata
Hakuna Matata
Hakuna Matata

It means no worries for the rest of your days
It's our problem free philosophy, Hakuna Matata

Hakuna Matata
Hakuna Matata
Hakuna Matata
Hakuna Matata Lyrics
ACE Paragraph
The song “Hakuna Matata” from
The Lion King
alludes to Shakespeare’s
Romeo and Juliet
. In the thirteenth line of “Hakuna Matata”, Timone says, “Thoughta changin’ my name, oh,
what’s in a name?
” This directly alludes to line 43 of Act 2, Scene 2 where Juliet says, “What’s Montague? It is nor hand, nor foot/Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part/Belonging to a man. O, be some other name!/
What’s in a name?
That which we call a rose/By any other word would smell as sweet.” In
Romeo and Juliet
, the phrase “What’s in a name?” expresses that just because Romeo is a Montague does not mean he is bad like Juliet's family thinks. By saying that a rose would still smell as sweet if you called it something different, Juliet means that even if Romeo went by a different name, he would still be the same person. In “Hakuna Matata”, Pumba is ashamed because of how he smells, and he considers changing his name. However, Timone says, “Oh, what’s in a name?” to show that even if he changed his name, Pumba would still be the same person (or warthog). This is similar to in
Romeo and Juliet
because both Timone and Juliet agree that a name does not define a person. These similarities show that
Romeo and Juliet
supports the theme of “Hakuna Matata” that sometimes in life, a person may feel like their name does not define them even if others try to make them someone that they are not. This allusion is still relevant today because many people are still judged based on things like their name, but that may not be who they really are. “Hakuna Matata” alludes to
Romeo and Juliet
with the phrase, “What’s in a name?” which shows that a name does not define someone.
Citations
Allusion to Romeo and Juliet
Act 2, Scene 2, Line 43
Allusion to Romeo and Juliet
Shakespearean Allusion: Hakuna Matata
Juliet says:

'Tis but thy name that is my enemy.
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
What’s Montague? It is nor hand, nor foot,
Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part
Belonging to a man. O, be some other name!
What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other word would smell as sweet.
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo called,
Retain that dear perfection which he owes
Without that title. Romeo, doff thy name,
And for that name, which is no part of thee
Take all myself.
Full transcript