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Argue, Persuade & Advise

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Anu Azhakesan

on 15 October 2013

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Transcript of Argue, Persuade & Advise

English
Lesson
Argue, Persuade and Advise

L.O:
To be able to say the definitions of what argue, advise and persuade is.
level 4

To be able to read a text and identify whether it's an argument, advise or persuasive text.
level 5

To be able to write an argument, persuasive and advisable text, using all the features needed.
level 6
Starter:
Read this paragraph about "argue, persuade and
advise".
When writing to argue, persuade and advise, you are offering ideas to other people. However, each style does this in different ways. If you argue, the writing tends to look at both sides and come to a conclusion. If you persuade, it tends to be one-sided, making your ideas the only sensible choice. If you advise, it tends to be softer, guiding someone towards your ideas.
Writing to
argue
...
The key thing about writing an argument is that you present both sides and come to a clear conclusion. It's not like arguing with one of your friends, when you just say what you think. Instead, when you write an argument you have to show you are reasonable and can consider the different sides.
The following article has appeared in your local paper:
Park or car park?



Ashfield Park is threatened with closure next month as a local business has applied for planning permission to turn the area into a car park. Local residents have begun a fierce campaign to save the park, which is a popular walking spot for young children and the elderly, as well as home to the War Memorial and many wildlife species.
A good argument presents both the good and bad aspects of keeping the park. For instance, the park might protect nature, but cost a lot to keep clean. It might be a good place to walk, but few people actually go there. An argument depends on bringing these ideas together. Use connectives, like "because" or "however" or "although". These words give your argument a logical structure and help make the contrasts clear.
Writing to
Persuade
...
When you are persuading people, you usually use a different style. You don't need to show both sides - all you have to do is present your ideas. For instance, imagine you had to persuade people to buy a certain toothpaste. You could write about the great taste, or how clean your teeth feel or how white they are. It doesn't really matter what you find to write about as long as you get them to buy it.
But you wouldn't write about other makes of toothpaste. You don't persuade like this, because it sounds like you aren't sure. So the first thing to remember is:
Be definite -
if you are writing about how great chips are, keep repeating the idea. Convince yourself how good they are - they might even be a healthy option, because lots of doctors are bound to like them and chips wouldn't be so popular if they weren't really great, would they? Once you have convinced yourself, it's much easier to convince others. So next you need to remember to...
The Persuader's Toolkit
Repeat yourself -
don't worry about saying the same thing again and again - people forget, so repeat yourself and they will remember. Even when you think they might remember, you can always repeat yourself another time.
Writing to
Advice
...
Once you can argue and persuade, it should be easy to advise. The trick is to be gentle - it's no good pushing your ideas at your readers, or trying to impress them. Instead, you should come across as friendly, as someone who just wants to help.
For instance, imagine you're writing to advise someone in Year 9 who is moving house and has to change schools. We know that it won't be easy - they'll have to make new friends and cope with all sorts of changes. So you need to be sympathetic and give some ideas you think could help.
If you're not sure what to do on the first day, ask someone.

You can add information to this - perhaps explaining why and giving an example of what to do, so now your paragraph looks like this:

If you're not sure what to do on the first day, ask someone. Most people will be glad to help and it's the quickest way to make friends. You can ask a teacher, but it might be better to ask one of the other pupils. Choose a friendly face if you can, and don't be shy - it might be their first day too.

It is not just the information that makes this a good piece of advice, it's also the style. It includes words like "might" and "can". These make the ideas softer - they are not in your face and pushing you to agree, they just guide you. And they are very simple to use, so make sure you include words like "should, can, could, might, ought to and may" - each one turns an idea into a piece of advice.
We are now going to do an activity. We all need to take part using our knowledge from todays lesson.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ks3bitesize/english/writing/argue_persuade_advise/activity.shtml
Task 1:
Task 2:
We are now going to do a quiz. There are 3 options to help you. You need to choose the one you think is right and write it down on the paper given. Do not copy or discus your answers with anyone.

HIDE YOUR ANSWERS!
1. You think the local park is a dump and that the council should spend more money on it. So you write to the local paper to complain.

Argue

Persuade

Advise
2. Your local council wants to impose a nine o'clock curfew for under eighteens in your town. Write an article for the paper discussing the pros and cons.

Argue

Persuade

Advise
3. You are keen to support a local charity and have been asked to write a speech about it to be read at your school.

Argue

Persuade

Advise
4. Your friend has emailed you asking how to format their computer. You write a reply telling them how.

Argue

Persuade

Advise
5. Mrs. Burnley, a local health visitor goes door-to-door telling people about the dangers of smoking.

Argue

Persuade

Advise
Answers...
1. You think the local park is a dump and that the council should spend more money on it. So you write to the local paper to complain.

Argue

Persuade

Advise
PERSUADE
2. Your local council wants to impose a nine o'clock curfew for under eighteens in your town. Write an article for the paper discussing the pros and cons.

Argue

Persuade

Advise
ARGUE
3. You are keen to support a local charity and have been asked to write a speech about it to be read at your school.

Argue

Persuade

Advise
PERSUADE
4. Your friend has emailed you asking how to format their computer. You write a reply telling them how.

Argue

Persuade

Advise
ADVISE
5. Mrs. Burnley, a local health visitor goes door-to-door telling people about the dangers of smoking.

Argue

Persuade

Advise
PERSUADE
The best style for this example is writing to persuade people to get involved.
This is difficult. She could do her talk in different ways, but the most likely way is to persuade pupils to either stop or not to start in the first place.
Well done! Now have a look at the level ladder to see what level you have achieved.
Level Ladder
Score Level
5/5 5b
4/5 5c
3/5 4a
2/5 4b
1/5 4c
0/5 NOT ACCEPTABLE
END
OF
LESSON

Be positive -
it's always better to hear how good your idea is rather than how bad other people's are. So write about the things that show your ideas in the best light. For instance, aren't chips just great for a quick snack? Why were chips voted the most popular option in our school at lunchtime? And finally don't be frightened to...
Be pushy -
If you don't seem too sure, or if you can't make your ideas stand out, then you aren't really persuading as much as you can. And if that is the case, you need The Persuaders' Toolkit.
Be personal -
using words such as "we" or "I" always sounds a lot more convincing. We all know that, don't we?
Use questions -
why would you use questions? Well, they make people think. They also get your readers involved in what you are writing. So will you use them when you persuade? If not, why not?
Use feelings to push ideas -
words are your ammunition. In seconds, they can make your friends laugh, or your teacher angry, so why not use them properly to persuade your readers?
For instance, don't just write "the pressure of doing school work", because there is no real feeling there. Instead, how about: "the endless trauma, the desperation and the mindless suffering that school work inflicts on students".

The first thing might be to plan each main idea in a separate paragraph because it's easier to follow like this. Then think about how you want to present your ideas. It might be fine to give some information as an order, such as:
Write to your local paper, arguing that the park should be preserved.
It would not be enough to write that you want the park to be saved - it might be how you feel, but it wouldn't be an argument..
It wouldn't even be enough if you wrote about all the good things in the park. That would be persuading as you haven't thought about any other views.
Once you have worked through these ideas, you come to your conclusion - saying whether they should keep the park or not.
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