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Embedded System Life Cycle - Microwave Oven

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Jom Balatbat

on 9 December 2013

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Transcript of Embedded System Life Cycle - Microwave Oven

Embedded System Development Life Cycle
Concept Development
Radar Technology
The principle of radar, as a matter of fact , is used by nightly hunter since early epoches of living creatures on earth. It does however , not transmit electromagnetic but ultrasonic waves by an appointed developed voice organ and receives echoes by antenna like ears.

Production
Radar Technology
Thradar was the primary ground-based gun laying radar for both the Lutwaffe and the Werchmacht Heer (German Army) duringe low-UHF band Würzburg  WWII. Initial development took place before the war, entering service in 1940. Eventually over 4,000 Würzburgs of various models were produced. It took its name from the city of Würzburg as the project leader liked geographical names.
Deployment
Radar Technology
The British used radar technology in world war II for detecting incoming air craft.
Concept Development
Radarange
He attached a high density electromagnetic field generator to an enclosed metal box
Product Design Radarange
A microwave oven consists of:
-a high voltage power source, commonly a simple transformer or an electronic power converter.
-a high voltage capacitor connected to the magnetron, transformer and via a diode to the case.
-a cavity magnetron.
-a magnetron control circuit (usually with a microcontroller).
-a waveguide (to control the direction of the microwaves).
-a cooking chamber.

Production Radarange
Needs/Opportunity Radar Technology
Needs
radar starts with experiments by Heinrich Hertz in the late 19th century that showed that radio waves were reflected by metallic objects. That’s why they build a simple ship detection device intended to help avoid collisions in fog.

Opportunity
they use radio frequency technology

The magnetron would then shoot into the metal box, so that the electromagnetic waves would have no way to escape, which would allow for more controlled and safe experimentation.
He then placed various food items in the box and monitored their temperature to observe effect.
Deployment
Radarange
By late 1946, the Raytheon Company had filed a patent proposing that microwaves be used to cook food. An oven that heated food using microwave energy was then placed in Boston restaurant.

In 1947, Raytheon built the "Radarange", the first commercially available microwave oven was installed (and remains) in the galley of the nuclear-powered passenger/cargo ship NS Savannah.
Support/Maintenance Radarange
Upgrades
Radarange
-From magnetron to electron tubes.
-Remove the plumber.
-100 volts of electricity consumption from 3 kilowatts
Retirement/ Disposal Radarange
Magnetrons were not used anymore due to it’s requirement of a plumber that cools it down.

Needs/Opportunity
Amana Radarange
Needs
To produce a smaller, safer and more reliable.

Opportunity
Electron tubes does not need water coolant installation called plumber.
Concept Development Amana Radarange
The same with the first version of Radarange that enclose the electromagnetic waves into a cooking chamber that produces the heat to cook food the difference is it does not require anymore a plumber to cool down the magnetron.
Product design
Amana Radarange
The material used in the first radarange is still used in this Amana version of radarange except they replaced the magnetron to electron tube and some of the parts got smaller.
Production
Amana Radar Range
Deployment
Amana Radarange
homes of Chicago
Support/Maintenance Amana Radar Range
Microwave oven technology was so unconventional, Amana executives sensed that the new product didn’t stand a chance in the marketplace without a massive effort to educate appliance retailers and consumers.
Upgrades
Amana Radarange
Electron tube from magnetron
No more plumbing
Retirement/Disposal
Amana Radar Range
Needs/Opportunity
Microwave by Litton
Needs
To develop a new configuration of the microwave: the short, wide shape

Opportunity
Availability of magnetron feed
Concept Development
Microwave by Litton
reconfiguration of magnetrons and design of microwave.
This resulted in an oven that could survive a no-load condition, or an empty microwave oven where there is nothing to absorb the microwaves
Product Design
Microwave by Litton
Short and wide design.
Eliminate plumbing for cooling

Production
Microwave by Litton
Result is the short, wide shape microwave which is common today a microwave that can survive a no load condition or an empty microwave oven where there is nothing to absorb the microwaves resulting in elimination of plumbing for cooling.
Deployment
Microwave by Litton
The new oven was shown at a trade show in Chicago, and helped begin a rapid growth of the market for home microwave ovens.
Support/Maintenance Microwave by Litton
Upgrades
Microwave by Litton
Radar Range to Litton
Reengineering of magnetrons
Reduction of size

Retirement/Disposal
Microwave by Litton
Needs/Opportunity Electronic Microwave
Needs
Ovens usually can use a variety of methods to cook. In order to provide faster, more-even cooking, a fan oven, which has a fan with a heating element around, that provides the heat. Or a fan-assisted oven that use a small fan to circulate the air in the cooking chamber, can be used.
Opportunity
An oven that uses micro radiation waves as a source of heat in order to cook food as opposed to a fire source. 
Concept Development
Electronic Microwave
Prior to gas and electricity, burning wood was the primary way to heat up dinner or warm up a room. The invention of the electric oven, despite having a slow start commercially, soon became the ideal way to cook and prepare a meal across America and the world.
Product Design Electronic Microwave
The cover or outer case of the microwave oven is usually a one-piece, wrap-around metal enclosure.
The oven's inside panels and doors are made of galvanized or stainless steel.
The cooking surface is generally made of ceramic or glass. 
Inside the oven, electromechanical components and controls consist of timer motors, switches, and relays
Also inside the oven are the magnetron tube, the waveguide, and the stirrer fan, all made of metal.
Production Electronic Microwave
Deployment
Electronic Microwave
Support/Maintenance Electronic Microwave
Upgrades
Electronic Microwave
One major improvement in electric ovens was the invention of resistor heating coils, a familiar design in ovens also seen in hotplates.
Pintsch-Regler
Product Design
Radar Technology
The reflected Rehbock pulses
Cathode tuning circuit
The Nullode type LG71
Ü62d, the first local oscillator module
There were many myths and fears surrounding these mysterious new electronic "radar ranges."
radiation poisoning
going blind
sterile
By the seventies, more and more people were finding the benefits of microwave cooking.
In this modern time most of house
in the world has a microwave that is
used for reheating and cooking foods
in the most convenient way.
Warranty
official receipt
covered by the date of warranty from date of purchase
Electron tube
magnetron tube feeder
Full transcript