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Richmond 1919

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on 7 May 2014

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Transcript of Richmond 1919

What life was like 90 years ago in the streets of Richmond.
Richmond 1919
Rosella's is the jam factory that Charlie's best friend, Norman "Nostrils" Heath temporarily worked in. Charlie saw this as a boring job that he would not like to end up in. The wages were also very poor.

This is the modern day price of a terrace home in Richmond. In 1919 the prices were not as high as this because they were a lot less luxurious, and people obviously did not have this much money. As you can see, the houses were very small and provided limited space for a family. The house advertised below only has 3 bedrooms and one bathroom in a very enclosed area.
This is an example of the house on Cubitt Street that Charlie Feehan, his Ma, and his brother Jack lived in. These houses are called terraces, because they are joined at the sides and are smaller than an average house.
"In the slums of Richmond, dampness was the enemy". This shows that the streets were always cold and difficult to live in. This is the main reason that Charlie started running.
These are the floor boards of a
terrace. People used to rip up floor boards to use them as wood to light a fire, because they could not afford proper wood. Although the heat was limited, it was still enough to keep a family warm for a small duration of time.
This is an average alleyway of Richmond. Alleyways in Richmond 1919 would look very similar to this. They were extremely narrow compared to most alleyways today. The ground was often made of cobblestone because it was durable and would not wear out easily and if waste ever leaked it would go to drains. To a lack of a sewerage system, people used to have outside toilets. Later, the night cartman would pick up the waste off the side of the street and dispose of it.
"Over the following months, those shoddy boots tasted the dirt and grime of many streets."
This quote shows that the streets were very grimy and disgusting.
This house is an example of the Redmond's house. Their house was a typical terrace which was connected to the Feehan's house. Wealthier people would often put decorations such as gardens, fancy fences, and lattice. The house in this picture has a fence decoration, which is now popular in a majority of houses in Richmond.

This is the Richmond Football Ground, where Norman "Nostrils" Heath played in the Richmond team. Nostrils played Forward Flank and Centre-Half Forward in his team. This is also the location where he humiliated Jimmy Barlow in front of both team's players and their supporters. In the background you can see the grand stand where Charlie Feehan told Norman's dad about the "finkin' and footwork" tactic. This helped Norman's gameplay after his dad had told him to think about his "finkin' and footwork".

“I ope ya don't mind, Charlie, but I borrowed one a ya effs.' said Charlie's dad
This is an example of Leslie 'Squizzy' Taylor's house. The area around his house was often feared because 'Squizzy' himself was feared. Because he was a wealthier man, his house had a better inside and outside. Although a fancy house, being a terrace, it was still quite small.

This is Darlington Parade, where Charlie Feehan ran to win a race so he could work for 'Squizzy'. This street is also where 'Squizzy' Taylor lived, so Charlie came here a lot. This is also where Charlie fell onto the ground, which almost cost him the race
This timber yard represents the Heath & Feehan Timber Yard that Charlie bought after he had won the money he got Mr. Redmond to bet from the Ballarat Mile. Charlie had previously said to Nostrils that he wanted to buy a timber yard. "I can see it now, Charlie. Heath and Feehan Timber Yard. It's got a ring to it"
This is what Nostrils said to Charlie when they first saw the timber yard
"I didn't want to be like Nostrils, sticking labels on tins of jam at Rosella's."
This quote indicates that Charlie sees Nostril's job as a simple and boring job, and Charlie wants something more adventurous.
Interesting Facts about Richmond & Runner
'Squizzy' Taylor was not the only non fictional character in this novel. Other characters like Dolly and Henry Stokes were actual people. John "Snowy" Cutmore, who was not mentioned in the novel much, was also a real person.
In 1919, Richmond was also known as 'Struggletown', due to the amount of people that struggled to survive during that era.
The jam factory that Norman Heath worked at, called 'Rosella' actually got it's name not from the Rosella bird, but from the Rosella plant that the jam is made out of.
Full transcript