Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Business Culture in South America

Dress Code, Welcoming, Negotiation, ...
by

Jennifer Stammerjohann

on 4 March 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Business Culture in South America

At social occasions, it is usual to arrive 1 - 2 hours delayed

If you visit someone’s house, do not enter the bedroom

Turning your back on someone is impolite

Smoking indoors is legal, people tend to often smoke in restaurants, bars, discos
Thank you for your attention!
Do you have any questions?
Seminar: Cross-Culture Competencies

Ann-Christin Böse, Jennifer Stammerjohann, Maya Brücher
Social occasion - do not bring up business matters first

Don’t put your knife down and switch your fork to the other hand

When passing sth., avoid to hand it directly into their hands

Keep hands on the table and never put your elbows on the table

When toasting, it is common to say “Salud”

Don't check your watch and answer your phone

Its usual to split the bill
Business Meetings
4. Differences within the continent
1. The sign for "OK" formed by your forefinger and thumb is offensive in Venezuela.

2. It is acceptable to discuss personal information in business meetings before getting to know
your business colleagues.

3. Which countries in South America have the lowest scales in terms of Hofstede´s
Individualism dimension?

4. Physical contact that reaches beyond the handshake is not appropriate in South American
business culture.

5. In Chile you should not make an appointment during carnival.

6. South American business people answer emails, calls and letters promptly.

7. Which South American country has the highest power distance?

8. It is ok to arrive late at business meetings as your business partner will arrive late too.

9. You probably won't sign a business contract in South America at the first meeting.

10. If you ask a counterpart to do something, don’t expect them to do it right away.
South America
1. Introduction
3. Business Culture
2. Drivers of Culture (Hofstede)
5. Quiz
Key Facts
Area:


Population:


Countries:


Major religions:
17,840,000 km


Approx. 387 Million


12


Roman Catholicism, Protestantism
Ethnic background
Language
General Information
Personal relationships have an enormous importance for business dealings!
Dress Code
Black suit, white shirt
and a tie
Elegant business suits or dresses
Communication
Appearance is very important
Business attire is rather formal and conservative, yet stylish
Good quality accessories are important for both sexes
Residents of the east coast dress more informally than those on the west coast
Business Behaviour
Social Behaviour
Do's and Don'ts
DO socialise and have small talk with counterpart before talking about business

DO wait until you are introduced by someone before you start talking

DO have eye contact, show emotions and use gestures

DO arrive on time on meetings although your counterpart probably will be delayed

DO make jokes and smile as it puts off pressure

DO have your business cards and presentation material printed in Spanish / Portuguese and English
DON'T hurry business partners in negotiations

DON'T refuse body contact

DON'T sign a contract promptly

DON’T take off your jacket or tie until your counterpart does

DON'T refer to the United States as "America"

DON’T use one finger to point, but use the whole hand when making gestures

DON'T criticise someone in front of other business colleagues
Hofstede's 5D* Model
Power Distance
Individualism
Masculinity
Uncertainty Avoidance
Inequality amongst people is accepted
Influenced by migration background
Two of the most collectivistic cultures in the world
Masculine society - highly success oriented
Rather moderate behaviour and attitude
Strong need for rules and elaborate legal system in order to structure life
South America shows a mixture of Europeans, Amerindians, and Africans

Large European Ancestry
Since 1990s the economics experienced a rapid development, but high inflation rate (e.g. Venezuela 22%)

Large economic gap between the rich and poor

The economy of Brazil is largest in South America (Member of the BRIC- Countries)

Main economic sectors are agriculture (coffee, soybeans, cocoa) and manufacturing of consumer goods
6. Conclusion
Welcoming
Small Talk
Language
Non-Verbal
South Americans speak English, French or German or another language

They will admire you more if you make an attempt to speak Spanish/Portuguese

Bring an interpreter to meetings if you do not have a proficient knowledge of the language
Negotiation
Collaboration
Decisions are made at the top

Personal interaction is preferred rather than emails, faxes, and calls

It takes time to cultivate the truly personal relationship

Deadlines are often not met

Women have to work extra hard to become respected

People quite often smoke in their offices
Dining
Promotional items are not viewed as appropriate gifts between potential business partners

Adequate presents: flowers, cigars, chocolate, wine

Gifts are usually not opened directly

Avoid black wrapping

Refusing a gift is bad social etiquette
Gift-Giving
Business professionals arrive on time to meetings

Much more pronounced hierarchy in comparison to other South American countries

Small talk before a meeting is minimal

While meeting groups, introduce yourself to the eldest person first
Venezuela
Private Meetings
It is impolite to speak Spanish

Use first names in negotiations

The American "okay gesture" is regarded as obscene

Avoid comparisons between Argentina and Brazil

Do not make appointments during Carnival

Gifts should be opened in front of the person who gave it

Kissing on the cheek is different within the country
Brazil
Chile
Sources
Questions
Argentina
Economy
Do not talk about religion and the Falkland Islands conflict

Avoid comparisons with the United States or Brazil

Don‘t eat or drink in public since it is considered as being rude
Lower degree of bureaucracy

Avoid to slap your open hand over your fist

Do not bring purple flowers as purple means death
Smaller sense of personal space and highly tactile in many situations
Portuguese and Spanish are the most spoken languages

Spanish is the official language of most countries, along with native languages

Portuguese is spoken in Brazil
Guyana
Suriname
French Gujana (France)
Brazil
Venezuela
Colombia
Ecuador
Peru
Bolivia
Chile
Paraguay
Uruguay
Argentina
South Americans tend to be formal socially just like Europeans
Colombia
Colombians are rather "indirect communicators"

Protecting relationship and face is crucial

Avoid talking about drug trade or crime in general
GDP in South america
Handshaking with direct eye contact and a welcoming smile
Women: kiss(es) on the cheek
Men: brief hug
Use appropriate greeting

Address people by academic or
professional title

Use surname and "usted" until invited
to move on to first name and "tù"
"Buenos días, Señor Rivas"
Source: CIA World Factbook
Direct and constant eye contact
Touchy-feely
Greater use of hand and arm gestures
Less physical distance
Conclusion
Sports
Home country
Culture
Emerging markets - high potential in terms of business development

The culture is influenced by European immigrants

There are similarities in South America's business culture, but be aware of some differences

Consider more time at negotiations with business partners from South America

Personal relationships are very important
Hobbies
Family
Travel experience
Difficult to arrange meetings too far in advance

Be punctual to meetings even though your counterpart is not

Less pre-meeting preparation, agendas are very likely to be ignored

Host / hostess introduces you to others at a small gathering

Long pre-meeting chat = vital part of the business relationship building proce
ss

Business Cards should be translated into Spanish/Portuguese
Negotiations can be quite lengthy

Plan on holding several meetings

It is common to be interrupted, to argue or criticize

Honesty and integrity are highly valued

Don’t rely on oral contracts at all
Sources
Cyborlink, Brazil Business Etiquette & Culture: http://www.cyborlink.com/besite/brazil.html

The Brazil Business, Converse like a brazilian:
http://thebrazilbusiness.com/article/converse-like-a-brazilian

Business Knigge Brasilien: http://www.knigge.de/themen/geschaeftsleben/business-knigge---brasilien-11676.htm

World Business Culture, Doing Business in Brazil: http://www.worldbusinessculture.com/Business-in-Brazil.html

World Business Culture, Doing Business in Argentina:
http://www.worldbusinessculture.com/Business-in-Argentina.html

The Hofstede Centre, Argentina: http://geert-hofstede.com/argentina.html

Maps of the world, Fast Facts - South America: http://www.mapsofworld.com/pages/fast-facts/south-america/

Collier, Simon, Thomas E. Skidmore, and Harold Blakemore, eds. (1992). The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Latin America and the Caribbean. 2nd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

CIA World Factbook: https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/

Hamlett, C., Business Etiquette in Brazil. Traveltips USA Today: http://traveltips.usatoday.com/business-etiquette-brazil-16277.html

Wall, K., Business Etiquette in South America: http://www.ehow.com/about_6702510_business-etiquette-south-america.html

Go South Expat, Business Etiquette in South America: http://www.gosouthexpat.com/business-etiquette.html

Get customs, Doing business abroad: http://www.getcustoms.com/2004GTC/Articles/oag_11.html
1
2
3
4
5
6
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
7
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
Presented by:
Ann-Christin Böse
Jennifer Stammerjohann
Maya Brücher

Business Culture in South America
2
Individualism
Power Distance
Argentina: ca. 85%
Venezuela: ca. 60%
Chile: ca. 50%
Brazil: ca. 47%
Colombia: 37%
Ecuador: 31%
Peru: 15%
Full transcript