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Lord Alfred Tennyson

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by

Chan Park

on 12 November 2015

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Transcript of Lord Alfred Tennyson

The Eagle
He
clasps the crag with crooked

hands
;

A
Close to the sun in lonely
lands
,
A
Ring'd with the azure world, he
stands
.
A

The
wrinkled sea beneath him
crawls
;

B
He watches from his mountain
walls
,
B
And
like a thunderbolt he

falls
.

B
Lord Alfred Tennyson
The Charge Of The Light Brigade (Stanzas 1-2)
Half a league, half a league,
Half a league onward,
All in the
valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.
'Forward, the Light Brigade!
Charge for the guns!'
he said:
Into the
valley of Death

Rode the six hundred.

'Forward, the Light
Brigade
!'
Was there a man
dismay'd
?
Not tho' the soldier knew
Some one had blunder'd:
Their's not to make
reply
,
Their's not to reason
why
,
Their's but to do and
die
:
Into the
valley of Death

Rode the six hundred.

Crossing the Bar
Sunset and evening
star
,
And one clear call for
me
!
And may there be no moaning of the
bar
,
When I put out to
sea,


5
But such a
tide as moving seems
asleep
,

Too full for sound and
foam
,
When that which drew from out the boundless
deep

Turns again
home
.

Twilight and evening
bell
,
10
And after that the
dark
!
And may there be no sadness of
farewell
,
When I
embark
;

For tho' from out our bourne of Time and
Place
The flood may bear me
far
,
15
I hope to see my Pilot face to
face
When I have crost the
bar
.

The Kraken
Below the thunders of the upper
deep
,
Far, far beneath in the abysmal
sea
,
His ancient, dreamless, uninvaded
sleep
The Kraken sleepeth: faintest sunlights
flee
About his shadowy sides; above him
swell
Huge sponges of millennial growth and
height
;
And far away into the sickly
light
,
From many a wondrous grot and secret
cell
Unnumbered and enormous
polypi
Winnow with giant arms the slumbering
green
.
There hath he lain for ages, and will
lie
Battening upon huge sea worms in his
sleep
,
Until the latter
fire shall heat the

deep
;
Then once by man and angels to be
seen
,
In roaring he shall rise and on the surface

die
.
Tears, Idle Tears
Tears, idle tears, I know not what they mean,
Tears from the
depth of some divine despair
Rise in the heart, and gather to the eyes,
In looking on the happy autumn-fields,
And thinking of the days that are no more.


Fresh as the first beam glittering on a sail
,
That brings our friends up from the underworld,
Sad as the last which reddens over one
That sinks with all we love below the verge;
So sad, so fresh, the days that are no more.

Ah,
sad and strange as in dark summer dawns
The

earliest pipe of half-awakened birds
To dying ears, when unto dying eyes
The
casement slowly grows a glimmering square
;
So sad, so strange, the days that are no more.


Dear as remembered kisses after death
,
And sweet as those by hopeless fancy feigned
On lips that are for others;
deep as love
,
Deep as first love
, and wild with all regret;
O Death in Life
, the days that are no more!

Lord Alfred Tennyson
{
{
meter
8 iambic
meter
8 iambic
Stanza 1
Stanza 2
5
|personification
|personification
|simile
|
|
|
|
|imagery
|
|
|
|
A
B
A
B

C
D
C
D

E
F
E
F

G
A
G
A
Stanza 1
Stanza 2
Stanza 3
Stanza 4
{
{
meter 6
meter 6
|simile
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|metaphor
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
This is not the real picture of Tennyson, but a portrait of him
A
B
A
B
C
D
D
C
E
F
E
A
A
F
E
This poem does have rhyme, although it is not a specific rhyme pattern
|paradox
{
5
10
15
Stanza 1
{
{
{
meter
10
meter
11
meter
10
meter
11
Stanza 1
Stanza 2
Stanza 3
Stanza 4
5
10
15
20
|simile
{
meter 10
{
meter 10
{
meter 10
|repetition
Poems like these are called free-verse; they only have one stanza.
|alliteration
|simile
at first, this seems like a normal sequence of repetition, but the third suddenly changes
|metaphor
Stanza 1
Stanza 2
5
10
15
A
A


B
B
B
|
|dialogue
|dialogue
The rhyme patterns do not appear to have any connection with each other
Lord Alfred Tennyson was a poet who lived during the reign of Queen Victoria. His poems were inspired by the events that affected him during his life,such as trips or wars. Tennyson's writing style varies widely, as his poems are different in length, content, and use of figurative language.
Tennyson uses meter, which is a pattern of rhythm, in most of his poems
In this poem, he uses iambic meter, which is a special type of rhythm where an unstressed syllable is followed by a stressed syllable.
Personification is a type of figurative language where human-like characteristics are given to non-humans
Similes are comparisons using the words "like" or "as"
Rhyme is a repetition of similar sounds. They are represented by letters, such as "A" or "B".
imagery is words or phrases that appeal to the senses and conjure mental images
Repetition is the action of repeating words. Poets use this to emphasize ideas. They are represented in the poems shown by underlining.
Metaphors compare two different, unrelated things without using "like" or "as"
The use of
dialogue
and punctuation in this poem is unique, as poets do not usually write the poems like a narrative.
In this poem, Tennyson uses a specific rhyme pattern: ABAB.
This poem's use of meter is neither organized nor predictable.
This poem uses
alliteration
, which is the repeating of beginning consonant sounds in a group of words
There is no specific pattern of meter
A
paradox
is a contradictory statement used to make a reader think more about the idea
By: Chan Park
Bibliography
"Alfred, Lord Tennyson." Poetry Foundation. Poetry Foundation, n.d. Web. 12 Nov. 2015. <http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/alfred-tennyson>.
"Crossing the Bar." Poets.org. Academy of American Poets, n.d. Web. 12 Nov. 2015. <https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/crossing-bar>.
"Best Famous Alfred Lord Tennyson Poems." Best Famous Alfred Lord Tennyson Poems. Poetrysoup, n.d. Web. 12 Nov. 2015. <http://www.poetrysoup.com/famous/poems/best/alfred_lord_tennyson>.
Porter, Lavelle. "The Eagle." Poetry Foundation. Poetry Foundation, n.d. Web. 12 Nov. 2015. <http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/174589>.
"The Kraken." Poets.org. Academy of American Poets, n.d. Web. 12 Nov. 2015. <https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/kraken>.
Porter, Lavelle. "The Charge of the Light Brigade." Poetry Foundation. Poetry Foundation, n.d. Web. 12 Nov. 2015. <http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/174586>.
|paradox
The poem is a metaphor because the poem makes continuous references of being out in the ocean while the title and last line are entirely different concepts
Full transcript