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Art & Special Education

SPE 700
by

Jessica Manning

on 26 May 2014

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Transcript of Art & Special Education

Art & Learning

-"Learning differences are not negative, in fact-they generate more creative possibilities"

-Encourages individual creativity and individual problem-solving. It also allows for students to tell their own story

-"Art education reached students with special needs before federal special education laws were passed in 1975 and long before we heard the words “mainstreaming” and “inclusion.”
(Gerber, 2011)



Art +
Special Ed

"An arts education helps build academic skills and increase academic performance, while also providing alternative opportunities to reward the skills of children who learn differently."
-Gavin Newsom

Art & Living










Art & Development

"The arts offer opportunities to strengthen visual, auditory, tactile, and motor areas. Through the arts, a child can order his world, make sense of what he knows, relate past experience to the present, and turn muscular activity into thought and ideas."
(Gerber, 2011)
Art & You!


-
Sharing information
about your students positive behavior, special interests, or talents to other teachers. Partnership between art educators and special educators can stop negative experiences! (Gerber, 2011)

-Bring art into your classroom
by providing alternative ways to present information and/or assess learning. This may include using visuals/videos, assign a project instead of a test, draw a picture instead of answering a question, etc.!

- Use Adapted Resources
when making any type of art project in your class





Thank You for Listening!

Any questions?
Landscape Fresco
Amanda
Lisa Fittapaldi
"Brush into Darkness"
"First Jars"
By: Jessica Manning
Art & Learning

10 Lessons that the Arts Teach
National Art Education Association

1. The arts teach children to make good judgments about qualitative relationships.

2. The arts teach children that problems can have more than one solution
and that questions can have more than one answer.

3. The arts celebrate multiple perspectives.

4. The arts teach children that in complex forms of problem solving
purposes are seldom fixed, but change with circumstance and opportunity.

5. The arts make vivid the fact that neither words in their literal form nor numbers exhaust what we can know.

6. The arts teach students that small differences can have large effects.

7. The arts teach students to think through and within a material.

8. The arts help children learn to say what cannot be said.

9. The arts enable us to have experience we can have from no other source
and through such experience to discover the range and variety of what we are capable of feeling.

10. The arts' position in the school curriculum symbolizes to the young
what adults believe is important. (Eismer, 2002)

Art & Living












Chuck Close had various physical/learning disabilities.

Close shared, “If I hadn't had exposure to art and music and something that I could excel at, and something that I could feel good about – I always said, if I hadn‟t gone to Yale, I could have gone to
jail” (PBS, 2010). (Gerber, 2011)
Art & Development

Motor Skills:
Many motions involved in making art, such as holding a paintbrush or scribbling with a crayon, are essential to the growth of fine motor skills in young children.

Language Development:
For very young children, making art—or just talking about it—provides opportunities to learn words for colors, shapes and actions.

Decision Making:
According to a report by Americans for the Arts, art education strengthens problem-solving and critical-thinking skills.

Visual Learning:
Drawing, sculpting with clay and threading beads on a string all develop visual-spatial skills, which are more important than ever.

Inventiveness:
When kids are encouraged to express themselves and take risks in creating art, they develop a sense of innovation that will be important in their adult lives.

Cultural Awareness:
As we live in an increasingly diverse society, the images of different groups in the media may also present mixed messages.

Improved Academic Performance:
Studies show that there is a correlation between art and other achievement.
(Lynch, 2013)




Art & You!






"She quickly understood that painting her storehouse of memories was both a source of nourishment and a way to keep her world alive in her mind. As she began to paint, she also realized that the principles of art gave her a system for comprehending and navigating the three-dimensional world she could no longer see. Whatever she learned in her painting studio, working on a two-dimensional canvas, could be applied to her understanding of the vast world she lived in. After she understood spatial relationships and the principles of art, she could make her own way in the world as both an artist, and a human being." ( Blind Ambition Studios, 2011)
Art & You!


-
Sharing information
about your students positive behavior, special interests, or talents to other teachers. Partnership between art educators and special educators can stop negative experiences! (Gerber, 2011)

-Bring art into your classroom
by providing alternative ways to present information and/or assess learning. This may include using visuals/videos, assign a project instead of a test, draw a picture instead of answering a question, etc.!

- Use Adapted Resources
when making any type of art project in your class





References

Gerber, B. L. (2011). Art Education and Special Education: A Promising Partnership. 2011 NAEA Lowenfeld Lecture, 1-14.

Lisa Fittipaldi International Author and Artist (2011, December). In Blind Ambition Studios.. Retrieved May 2, 2014, from www.lisafittipaldi.com

Lynch, G. H. (n.d.). The Importance of Art in Child Development. In PBS Parents. Retrieved May 2, 2014.

Modification, Differentiation, Adaptation and the Art Classroom. (2012, January). In Artful Artsy Amy. Retrieved May 2, 2014, from http://artfulartsyamy.blogspot.com/2012/01/modification-differentiation-adaptation.html

(n.d.). In Special Needs in Art Education Issues Group. Retrieved May 2, 2014, from http://specialneedsart.weebly.com/

"Special Needs." BLICK. Dick Blick Art Materials, n.d. Web. 2 May 2014. <http://www.dickblick.com/categories/specialneeds/>.

Special Needs Art Lessons (n.d.). In Pinterest. Retrieved May 2, 2014, from http://www.pinterest.com/paintz/special-needs-art-lessons/

VSA Intersections: Arts and Special Education a Jean Kennedy Smith Arts and Disability Program of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts (n.d.). In Kennedy Center. Retrieved May 2, 2014, from https://www.kennedy-center.org/education/vsa/programs/special_education.cfm

Wellinghoff, J. (2005, July). Blind and Talented. In San Antonio Women. Retrieved May 2, 2014, from www.sawoman.com/blind-and-talented

Working With Special Needs Students in Art (n.d.). In Incredible Art Department. Retrieved May 2, 2014, from http://www.incredibleart.org/files/special.htm
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