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Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea Project

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by

Sarah Zhou

on 15 January 2013

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Transcript of Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea Project

Protective p. 93 "Miss Scatcherd wrote in conspicuous characters on a piece of paste-board the word 'Slattern' and bound it like a phylactery round Helen's ... forehead ... I ran to Helen, tore it off, and thrust it into the fire ..."

p. 344 "... she thrust up her candle close to my face, and extinguished it under my eyes ... I lost consciousness ... I became insensible from terror." p. 170 "On the second floor I threw away the candle."

p. 170 "There was a wall of fire protecting me but it was too hot, it scorched me and I went away from it." Fear-Inducing Misleading and Deceptive p. 72 "The dining-room was brilliantly lit. Candles on the table, a row of the side board, three-branch candlesticks on the old sea-chest. The two doors on to the veranda stood open but there was no wind. the flames burned straight ... I wondered why I had never realized how beautiful she was."

p. 124 "The light changed her. I had never seen her look so gay or so beautiful."

p. 125 "As I watched, hating, her face grew smooth and very young again, she even seemed to smile. A trick of the light perhaps." Vengeful and Destructive p. 35 "'Oh, my God, they get at the back, they set fire to the back of the house.' He pointed to my bedroom door which I had shut after me, and smoke was rolling out from underneath."

p. 39 "... Coco on glacis railing with his feathers alight. He made an effort to fly down but his clipped wings failed him and he fell screeching. He was all on fire ... it was very unlucky to kill a parrot."

p. 169 "I saw the wax candles too and I hated them. So I knocked them all down ... I saw the lovely colour spreading so fast." Two Cultures: The Worlds of
Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea Wide Sargasso Sea -
Jean Rhys Jane Eyre -
Charlotte Bronte Comforting and Dependable p. 88 "We went; following the superintendent's guidance, we had to thread some intricate passages, and mount a staircase before we reached her apartment; it contained a good fire and looked cheerful."

p. 401 "... when at a dim point, fair in among the marshes and the ridges, a light sprang up. 'That is an ignis fatuus, was my first thought; and I expected it would soon vanish. It burnt on, however, quite steadily; neither receding nor advancing ... it did not diminish, so it did not enlarge. It may be a candle in a house ..." Revealing and Illuminating p. 181 "There was a candle burning just outside, left on the matting in the gallery ... I became further aware of a strong smell of burning."

p. 255 "... there was a door apparent, which had then been concealed. This door was open; a light shone out of the room within." Whereas in Jane Eyre, Bronte uses fire to symbolize a sense of security and guidance, in Wide Sargasso Sea, Jean Rhys transforms this motif into a symbol of destruction and deception in order to highlight a clash between British and Jamaican culture due to the oppressive nature of British imperialism. IMAGINE now what if this was reality? YOU, as the imperialists, haven't had anyone or anything to fear.
YOU, as the oppressed people of Jamaica, have had everyone and everything to fear. with two different authors ...

two different perspectives ...

and two different purposes ... British imperialism has influenced literature and has transformed the universal motif of fire from one novel to the other.
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