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Smoking out does not equal dropping out.

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by

John Vaughan

on 6 May 2015

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Transcript of Smoking out does not equal dropping out.

Smoking out does not equal dropping out.
Research Hypothesis
There is a statistically significant relationship between the percent of children under the age of 17 who use marijuana and high school drop out rates.
Null Hypothesis
There is no statistically significant relationship between the percent of children under the age of 17 who use marijuana and high school drop out rates.
Turns out...
Null Hypothesis is true!
After conducting Descriptive statistics, the data reveals that there is very little correlation and significance between children under the age of 17 who smoke and high school drop out rates.
ANOVA
Coefficients
THANK YOU!
Model Summary
Scatterplot
The ANOVA F statistic is 2.892 which is fairly
low and close to 1.0 indicating that the mean
is a close prediction. The significance
value is > .05; therefore not very
reliable statistically.
The B coefficient for marijuana use is .864
which means that the HS Drop Out Rate
increases by .864% for every 1% increase in
marijuana use by children. But the .096
p-value and high Std error make
it statistically not a reliable
conclusion

The R-square is .059 which is
very low. It shows that Mary Jane
usage is a poor predictor of the
high school drop out rate.
As shown here, the data does not
have much of a linear relationship;
the regression line is a bit on the
deceptive side given the p-value
discussed earlier.
State MJ Use Drop Rate
RI 13% 23%
VT 11% 14%
CO 11% 26%
NH 10% 14%
D.C. 10% 41%
NM 9% 38%
NV 8% 37%
CA 8% 24%
Avg. 7.5% 21%
Sample Data
What does this mean for policy makers?

Efforts to curb MJ use will not likely improve high school graduation rates.
Full transcript