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a Professional Development Quest Portfolio

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Timothy Young

on 24 October 2013

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Transcript of a Professional Development Quest Portfolio

A Look Forward
Workshops
Communication & Observations
Literature
Mr. Young's Teaching Portfolio
Introduction
Hello, and welcome to my professional development quest portfolio. This presentation is designed to show you the BLANK in an organized, goal-driven set of documents that provide evidence of my knowledge, dispositons, and skills. Also provided, are reflections and self-assessments to help facilitate this process.
What's in the coffee?
I graduated in 2011 for the University of California, Santa Cruz with a Bachelors in Biology and minor in Education. I took a year off to explore different occupations and found one as a Para Educator. It was here working with students and teaching that I found my nitch. Shortly after I began my teaching credential and Master's program.
TPE DOMAINS
Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs) are designed to describe
the set of knowledge, skills, and abilities beginning teachers should have and be able to demonstrate. Teaching performance expectations describe teaching tasks that fall into six broad domains:

A. Making Subject Matter Comprehensible to Students
B. Assessing Student Learning
C. Engaging and Supporting Students in Learning
D. Planning Instruction and Designing Learning Experiences for Students
E. Creating and Maintaining Effective Environments for Student Learning
F. Developing as a Professional Educator
5 Year Plan
The following are a few plan projections into the future, approximately five years from now. These include trainings, courses, and workshops to meet my goals of continuous growth of my teaching skill sets of creating valuable lessons plans directed specifically to adhere the Common Core standards for Biology.

Strategies & Methods
Attend workshops that present valuable practices around planning instruction and how to resourcefully learn about students.
Communicate with administrators and the Biology Department Chair about the Common Core expectations. My main objective will be to get in clear alignment with the development of lesson plans.
Read literature that will make learning biology and science in general fun and engaging for students.

References
Alexander, A., Banta, T., Cross, P., El-Khawas, E., Ewell, P., Hutchings, P…Wright, B. (2006). Nine principles of good practice for assessing student learning. Retrieved from: http://teaching.uncc.edu/articles-books/best-practices-article.

Commission on Teacher Credentialing. (2013). California teaching performance expectations. Retrieved October 2, 2013 from http://www.ctc.ca.gov/educator-prep/TPA-files/TPEs-Full-Version.pdf

Garet, M. (2001). What Makes Professional Development Effective? Results from a national sample of teachers. American Educational Research Journal, 38 (4), 915-945. Retrieved from: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3202507

James A. Johnson, Diann L. Musial, Gene E. Hall, & Donna M. Gollnick. (2011). Foundations of American Education: Perspectives on Education in a Changing world (15th ed.). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey. Pearson Education, Inc.

Ventriglia, L.D. (2009). 21st Century questioning and problem solving: Infolinking. Mexico: Younglight Educate.

a Professional Development Quest Portfolio
If at anytime you wish to explore my portfolio on your own, just use your mouse to to navigate the page.
To begin, lets learn a little bit about who I am.
Artifact A1: Lesson Plan
Artifact A2: Literature Review
Artifact A3: Observation
A. Making Subject Matter Comprehensible to Students
Artifact B1: Literature Review
Artifact B2: Rubric
Artifact B3: Observation
B. Assessing Student Learning
TPE 2: Monitoring Student Learning During Instruction
Determining student progress toward achieving the state-adopted academic content standards
Using instructional strategies and techniques to support students' learning
TPE 3: Interpretation and Use of Assessments
Understanding a range of assessments
Using and interpreting a range of assessments
Giving feedback on assessment results

Artifact C1: Literature Review
Artifact C2: PowerPoint
Artifact C3: Workshop
C. Engaging and Supporting Students in Learning
 TPE 4: Making Content Accessible
Addressing state-adopted academic content standards
Prioritizing and sequencing content
Selecting and using various instructional strategies, activities, and resources to facilitate student learning
TPE 5: Student Engagement
Understanding of academic learning goals
Ensuring active and equitable participation
Monitoring student progress and extending student thinking
TPE 6: Developmentally Appropriate Teaching Practices
 a. Developmentally Appropriate Practices in Grades K-3
Understanding important characteristics of the learners
Designing instructional activities
Providing developmentally appropriate learning experiences
 b. Developmentally Appropriate Practices in Grades 4-8
Understanding important characteristics of the learners
Designing instructional activities
Providing developmentally appropriate learning experiences
TPE 7: Teaching English Learners
Understanding and applying theories, principles, and instructional practices for English Language Development
Understanding how to adapt instructional practices to provide access to the state-adopted student content standards
Drawing upon student backgrounds and language abilities to provide differentiated instruction

Artifact F1: Literature Review
Artifact F2: Timeline
Artifact F3: Observation
F. Developing as a Professional Educator
TPE 12: Professional, Legal, and Ethical Obligations
Engaging and supporting students in learning
Planning and designing learning experiences for all students
Building Family and Community Relationships
TPE 13: Professional Growth
Development of Characteristics of Learners
Individual Learning Differences
Assessment
Stronger accountability for results

D. Planning Instruction and Designing Learning Experiences for Students
TPE 8: Learning About Students
Understanding child and adolescent development
Understanding how to learn about students
Using methods to learn about students
Connecting student information to learning
TPE 9: Instructional Planning
Establishing academic learning goals
Connecting academic content to the students' backgrounds, needs, and abilities
Selecting strategies/activities/materials/resources

E. Creating and Maintaining Effective Environments for Student Learning
TPE 10: Instructional Time
Allocating instructional time
Managing instructional time
TPE 11: Social Environment
Understanding the importance of the social environment
Establishing a positive environment for learning
Maintaining a positive environment for learning
Full Teaching Performance Expectations can be found here
@ http://www.ctc.ca.gov/educator-prep/TPA-files/TPEs-Full-Version.pdf
Reflections
Telling My Story
As I began this project of our Professional Development Quest Portfolio, I saw it as my most daunting project yet in this program. I kept reading the directions over and over again, looking for examples, and searching the book for answers. But I have finally gotten started on it and I find it a fun project to work on. It is true though what the Costantino and Lorenzo have said in their book Developing a Professional Teaching Portfolio, it has been a “worthwhile process for documenting teaching performance, fostering professional growth, and facilitating reflective thinking” (pg. 1) towards making “an organized, goal-driven set of documents that provide evidence of a teacher’s knowledge, dispositions, and skills” (pg. 2.) but it has been a process that has been “labor intensive and time consuming…feel[ing] overwhelmed at the thought of having to develop a portfolio.” (pg. 6)

My progress up to this point has been a real struggle. After evaluating the directions, I decided to use a Prezi, an online-based presentation platform. Through my work on my PDQP I can reflect on my progress in achieving competencies in my chosen TPE domains. I believe that I may have much to go with my TPE domains. While I have evidence and experiences to put down, I have yet to have more practical experience and evidence to show. I would say I have just laid down much of the scaffolding I would need to succeed in my TPE but have more to go.

With the TPE I have chosen I have strength with understanding much of the state-adopted academic content standards. The issues have been how to teach in a differentiated manner as well as planning out instructions. But once I have figured out a plan to do so for a lesson, I have been successful in demonstrating the ability to teach those standards.

In this PDQP I am going to make it a complete e-portfolio. So I will be continuously adding to this platform. This platform will allow me to link much different evidence to add to my PDQP. I will be trying to look at all the TPE competencies in my PDQP but I know it will take time and work to do so.

To start, I choose the first because it was the first one on the list. But when I think about it, all these TPE domains or CCS are professional needs and goals that all teachers should strive for to be a complete teacher. I do have a preference for which I feel are stronger for a teacher, but I feel that each domain provides a valuable tool.

A Look Forward
One of the most valuable skills a teacher should have in any subject is being able to learn, adapt, and mold to each of their students. So when I am looking in to my future and planning it out, I want to invest in strategies that will increase my skill sets. Among those strategies, I have found many to be workshops & conventions, literature, and seeking peers’ out. Each of these in their own helps enhance my own knowledge and skills that in turn will help my teaching skill and ultimately the students themselves.

Workshops and conventions are probably the most practical, as they will often keep up with the times, whether it is content or teaching strategies/planning. Because of this nature, they can be extremely useful but also time consuming. The couple I have listed here are examples of workshops that would interest me towards my teaching skills. The there listed look into science and math assessments, brain functions, and the mind. The first of the three looks at assessments; as a teacher I am always looking for ways students can best show their skills and allow me to assess their abilities. That is why II choose an assessment workshop because it will help me allow students to succeed best in the classroom. The latter two workshops are similar in that they allow me to best mold to the students. They deal with how the mind and brain work. Knowing how they work, knowing how people think, helps myself best teach to the student’s skills and abilities by giving them instruction that they can best interpret. As we learn more about how the mind and brain works, we also learn new techniques to help increase uptake of knowledge.

The second strategy listed is communication. Communication with administration and other teachers is probably the most accessible of the strategy. For me, I am a visual and auditory learner. So hearing first hand how administration is aiming the schools education with standards as well as hearing from department chairs would make sure I am following standards. This would also allow me to learn techniques they use in the classroom that have worked or have failed. Peer observation falls in this category as well. If you can spend time observing other peer teachers, in and out of my subject, allows me to see first hand other strategies that can be adapted to my own teaching. Having others observe me will help give me prospective of my own teaching and allow me to improve in areas I may have deemed fit. This can be done continuously in one’s career so it can be a huge help towards my goal of continued learning of myself and for my students.

Lastly there is literature. There is the weakest of these three strategies I believe but can still be invaluable as a resource. There have been hundreds if not thousands of papers and books written about education. The one I have shown is one that my Master teacher gave me as a gift as I finished my student teaching. This book is a great one and I think that everyone should spend a summer reading. It gives practical advice and practices that I have found invaluable. While literature can become out of date or incorrect, you can skill learn from the past. Sometimes you can also find old strategies that may work with certain students. New literature will keep you up to date with current practices. This can be especially easier as more and more literature can be easily accessed online.

Progress Report
Final Thoughts
Teacher Performance
Expectations
TPE 1
Specific Pedagogical Skills for Subject Matter Instruction
Understanding the state-adopted academic content standards
Understanding how to teach the subject matter in the standards
Planning instruction that addresses the standards
Demonstrating the ability to teach to the standards
Linda Ventriglia
21st Century Questioning and Problem Solving
2009
Main Idea

Organizes curriculum to support student understanding of subject matter (TPE 1)



Supportive Evidence
“Foundational or factual questions are very important because they provide the structure or scaffolding for all knowledge” (Ventriglia, 2009, p.53)

Supportive Evidence
“Students learn to ask transformative critical thinking questions when they move from stating knowledge to constructing their own understandings of knowledge through examining, discussing, working on challenging problems and dealing with competing points of view” (Ventriglia, 2009, p.55)

Main Idea

Organizes curriculum and instructional strategies to develop deeper student learning (TPE 1)





Supportive Evidence
“The emphasis on linear problem solving and scripted direct instruction texts has left a huge void in concept learning. Students may know how to follow the logical problem solving steps but they often find it difficult to solve problems where there is no one right answer…students acquire problem solving skills through direct experience of exploring and confronting a challenge and by formulating new experiences to find solutions” (Ventriglia, 2009, pp.73-75)

Supportive Evidence
“Rowe (1987) found that when teachers extended their wait time to 3 seconds or more, the length of students’ responses, the incidence of critical and creative thinking and students’ understanding and achievement all increased” (Ventriglia, 2009, p.34)

Main Idea
Demonstrates knowledge of subject matter content and student development (TPE 1)


Supportive Evidence
“Teacher directed inquiry draws students into thoughtful interactions and reveals their level of thinking and conceptual understanding” (Ventriglia, 2009, p.13)

Supportive Evidence
“Open questions promote critical and creative thinking, encourage students to form hypotheses, speculate about possibilities, and invent new solutions in a format where discussion and analysis is promoted” (Ventriglia, 2009, p.25)
Supportive Evidence
Not all children learn at the same rate or at the same time. Differentiated instruction is the regular practice of employing a variety of instructional methods to match the different ways students learn and to accommodate the different levels of learning in a classroom. (Johnson, Musial, Hall, & Gollnick (2011). By assessing student’s strengths and weaknesses, using differential instruction, varying teaching strategies, and modifying lesson plans, we provide an equal opportunity for all students to learn.
Learning Goal







Activity:








Evidence of Student Learning
Artifact E1: Literature Review
Artifact E2: Classroom Management
Artifact E3: Observation
Artifact D1: Literature Review
Artifact D2: Lesson Plan
Artifact D3: Observation
Tim has struggled with content knowledge and the ability to describe complex concepts clearly and accurately. In order to address this issue, he has spent extra time reviewing content on his own before meeting with his mentor teacher to ask questions and rehearse lecture. Tim uses mostly established curriculum, but occasionally modifies sequence or structure to make the content more understandable to students. He is comfortable with the use of technology, and integrates it smoothly with his lessons.

-Lora Learner SSP Observations
Tim started the lesson with enthusiasm. This gets the students excited to learn and it helps specifically with the students who are struggling in biology. The lesson was about mutations, and Tim had made a power point for the lesson, which was great. The power point provided a good visual for the students to take notes from. I'm very happy with Tim's organization. He takes the time to make a power point (which he shares with his mentor teacher). This power point, as I mentioned, is a good visual for all students. Tim and I had met prior to the lesson to discuss not only the unit calendar, but the weekly and daily lessons. So Tim was prepared for students. Tim and I had met prior to the lesson to discuss not only the unit calendar, but the weekly and daily lessons. So Tim was prepared for this day; he had done his homework. Tim makes good use of his laptop and ipad by mixing technology into his lessons. At this point Tim knows almost everyone's name so he uses that to interact with the students. Slowly they're beginning to trust him as their teacher.

-Pooya Hajjarian SSP Obsevations
Your timeliness regarding turn in of materials and completion of work is admirable. Lesson plans are complete and follow well in a sequential pattern. Collegiality with SSPs and other staff is excellent. Instruction is now personalized and student teacher rapport is viewable. Tim has adjusted well to working with two divergent teaching styles and seems to grow and prosper from the experience.
Artifact 1
Assessment in Math & Science
http://www.learner.org/resources/series93.html

Workshops give opportunity to learn additional tools to use in the classroom and can increase my own creative abilities. This workshop examines current assessment issues and strategies in K-12 math and science classrooms. Through video segments of real classrooms interspersed with lively discussions of practicing teachers and content experts, see how teachers deal with common issues and discover ways to use assessment to improve teaching and learning.

Artifact 2
The Brain: Teaching Model
http://www.learner.org/resources/series142.html

Another workshop worth looking into is one that not only looks in to how learning is achieved but the biological aspects as well. Developed from the original series The Brain, these flexible resources offer extensive footage and research into the inner workings of this amazing human organ, including findings on Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, autism, Parkinson's disease, and many other topics.
Artifact 3
Minds of Our Own
http://www.learner.org/resources/series26.html

This workshop focuses on the minds facets. These video programs further explore how children learn. Based on recent research, as well as the pioneering work of Piaget and others, Minds of Our Own shows that many of the things we assume about how children learn are simply not true. For educators and parents, these programs bring new insight to debates about education reform. This would be one that I may want to bring back to the classroom so students can learn how their own minds work to best suit them.
One of the most valuable and readily available sources for professional growth can come right from your department chair and or other staff members. I can learn from their experience and insight not only on how to adhere to common core but also with how to work with the population at that school. Their experience in creating and implementing lesson plans will help me create better plans to best fit my students. I can ask for feedback as well having them take time to observe my teaching. I can also take time to do observations of other classes to gain more experience. This would be my first course of action as it will orient myself in the community and best work with it.
2015
2016
2018
2017
2014
Communicate with Administration (TPE 12)
Communicate with Department Chair (TPE 12)
Observation of other teachers
Have others observe myself
Continued communication with Administration and Department chair (TPE 12)
Continued classroom observations of other and myself
Read & Review Literature on Teaching
Continued communication with Administration and Department chair (TPE 12)
Continued classroom observations of other and myself
Workshop: The Brain (TPE 9)
Continued communication with Administration and Department chair (TPE 12)
Continued classroom observations of other and myself
Workshop: Minds of Our Own (TPE 9)
Continued communication with Administration and Department chair (TPE 12)
Continued classroom observations of other and myself
Workshop: Assessment in Math and Science (TPE 9)
Teach Like a Champion was a gift from my Master Teacher when I finished my student teaching at the beginning of the summer. It is resource that I think every teacher should read to help give some prospective on teaching. I have started to read but yet finished it but have found it to be very useful in my instructional skills. It is a current text with real world appicaltion that will help me in the future. Evidence of this benifitting myseld would be seen in my evaluation as they continue to inprove as I implement more strategies and mindsets from this great book.
Vol. 38, No. 4 (Winter, 2001), pp. 915-945
Michael S. Garet, Andrew C. Porter, Laura Desimone, Beatrice F. Birman and Kwang Suk Yoon
What Makes Professional Development Effective? Results from a national sample of teachers

Main Idea
High Quality of Professional Development
Supportive Evidence
Continuous and ongoing teacher collaboration

Supportive Evidence
Explicit goal of improving students’ achievement of learning goals.
Attention to student thinking

Relevance
Professional development instructors are trying to achieve the goals of: Focus on content, Promote active learning, Foster coherence, and Reflection on teacher’s part. This literature allows a teacher to reflect on their own experience as well as compare it to others to better understand how they themselves are doing

Main Idea
Teachers and instructors are necessary as the center of education reform. It starts here with them that stems change.
Success is based on teacher
qualifications
and
effectiveness
in the classroom
“They must carry out the demands of the high standards.”
Supportive Evidence
Supportive Evidence
Alexander, A., Banta, T., Cross, P., El-Khawas, E., Ewell, P., Hutchings, P…Wright, B.

Nine principles of good practice for assessing student learning.
Main Idea
TPE 3
Assess across the educational community.
Assessment as a larger set of conditions.
Not only outcomes, but experiences.
Relevance
Professional development instructors are trying assess students accurately and fairly. This literature allows a teacher to reflect on the students work with what to keep in mind when assessing students and how to best do so in different situations
Main Idea
TPE 2
Multidimensional learning
Ongoing assessment

Supportive Evidence
“not only what students know but what they can do with what they know.”
“employ(ing) a diverse array of methods, including those that call for actual performance…”
Supportive Evidence
“Assessment is a process whose power is cumulative.”

“…monitor progress toward intended goals in a spirit of continuous improvement.”
“Assessment is not task for small groups…but a collaborative effort.”

“…thinking in advance about how the information (assessment) will be used, and by whom.”

Supportive Evidence
“…information about learning outcomes is seen as an integral part of decision making.”

“…Provide information about the ways in which our students meet goals and expectations.”

Supportive Evidence
2015
2016
2018
2017
2014
Communicate with Administration (TPE 12)
Communicate with Department Chair (TPE 12)
Observation of other teachers
Have others observe myself
Continued communication with Administration and Department chair (TPE 12)
Continued classroom observations of other and myself
Read & Review Literature on Teaching
Continued communication with Administration and Department chair (TPE 12)
Continued classroom observations of other and myself
Workshop: The Brain (TPE 9)
Continued communication with Administration and Department chair (TPE 12)
Continued classroom observations of other and myself
Workshop: Minds of Our Own (TPE 9)
Continued communication with Administration and Department chair (TPE 12)
Continued classroom observations of other and myself
Workshop: Assessment in Math and Science (TPE 9)
Professional Development Opportunities for Teachers
Stanford University
CSET’s summer programs for teachers include:
The Stanford Summer Teaching Institute focused on the development of educators. The institute offers workshops in a range of areas, including teaching tools that can be used at all content and grade levels, innovative pedagogical practices, and ways to manage student learning.
Reasoning:
Classes such as this help continuously improve a teacher's ability to teach. I believe a teacher should try taking a class at least once a year to stay up to date with current technologies and theories so that they are always practicing the best practices. In this way the student would benefit the most and have a higher chance of succeeding.

Linda Ventriglia.
(2009)

Best Practices: Motivation and Student Engagement: Creating Power Learners
TPE 7: Teaching English Learners
Candidates know and can apply pedagogical theories, principles, and instructional practices for comprehensive instruction of English learners. They know and can apply theories, principles, and instructional practices for English Language Development leading to comprehensive literacy in English.
Learning a second language is easier for students who are able to learn it through interaction with other students. However, motivational factors influence second language acquisition and depend on individual attitude and desire to learn English. According to Ventriglia (2009) motivation to learn English is increased by the child’s desire to belong or identify with English speakers and lessened if the child’s desire is to retain their first language culture and identity. ELL students who identify with both cultures of the first and second language are usually more motivated in learning the second language. “Motivation styles are defined as interaction preferences” (Ventriglia, 2009, p. 50) and “the more students practice, the better their competence should become” (Fillmore, 2000, as cited in Ventriglia, 2009, p. 50).

Linda Ventriglia.
(2009)

Best Practices: Motivation and Student Engagement: Creating Power Learners
Candidates plan instruction that is comprehensive in relation to the subject matter to be taught and in accordance with state-adopted academic content standards for students.
“Lesson plans are organized, written instructions that teachers present a well-organized set of learning experiences for their students. The objective of the lesson specify the teacher’s expectations for what the students will learn or be able to do as a result of the lesson. When teachers plan objectives that specify the criteria for success, they are clarifying for themselves what the students must be able to do to demonstrated mastery of the skill or understanding of the lesson’s concepts” (Eby, Herrell, & Jordan, 2011, p. 67).
Seating Chart
Pearson Classroom Management. Classroom Management Simulations.
Creating Positive Student-Teacher Relations
One of the greatest indicators of student success is the teacher-student relationship. Teachers who form positive relationships with their students have better success at motivating their students.
When students feel they matter, are a part of and included in the classroom as a person and not just a student, it creates a bond between the student and teacher which enhances the academic achievement and success of the student. In Creating Positive Student-Teacher Relationships, the importance of establishing a positive student-teacher relationship was reflected in the way the teacher interacted with the students, their families and showed a genuine interest in the students as individuals, both inside and outside of the classroom (Pearson, 2010).
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