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Additive manufacturing in Aerospace

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Kawal Deep Singh

on 19 April 2014

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Transcript of Additive manufacturing in Aerospace

INTRODUCTION
Founded by William Edward Boeing and George Conrad Westervelt in 1916.
Headquarter based in Chicago.
What is Additive
Manufacturing?

Additive Manufacturing is a new process that operates by adding rather than subtracting.
Manufacturing Chamber
Why Change?
In conventional manufacturing, in cutting a part of titanium or aluminum, you are essentially wasting a large portion of that material.
Additive Manufacturing works on using a beam of lasers to cement powdered material into solid sections.
PROCESS
Additive Manufacturing

• Reduces wastage
• Allows for easy customization
• Can reduce outsourcing of
parts and sub assemblies
•Provides rapid prototype
development

Designing and Producing Shop Drawings of Object

Machining Parts – subtractive manufacturing
Measurement and Verification of Parts Dimensions: If NOT to requirements, part(s) are remanufactured.

If parts are the correct dimensions, they are assembled and the completed assembly is verified for correct operation. If NOT, corrections to the shop drawings are made and remanufactured. If it meets requirements, corrected as-built documents are produced.
3D Printing requires a digitized 3D designed model.
Computer Aided Design (CAD) or 3D Scanners are used to create the 3D Model.

Once the 3D model is created, the digital file is sent to a 3D printer for printing.
Once produced, the object is verified that it meets user requirements and specifications.
If NO, corrections are made to 3D Model and is re-printed.
If YES, 3D model is saved for future reproduction.

USE IN Aerospace field
Numerous airplane parts are currently being produced by this new production method due to the efficiency, speed and precision
ADVANTAGES IN AEROSPACE
WEIGHT REDUCTION
PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENTS
SIMPLIFICATION
COST OF GOOD SOLD IMPROVEMENT
LEAD TIME REDUCTION
REDUCE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT
OPPORTUNITIES FOR COMMERCIAL AVIATION
OPPORTUNITIES FOR SPACE
OPPORTUNITIES FOR MILITARY AND DEFENSE AIRCRAFT
Additive Manufacturing in Aerospace
Companies using this technology
Boeing
G.E. Aviation
NASA
Bombardier
AIRBUS
LOCKHEED MARTIN
ROLLS ROYCE
AM TECHNOLOGY IN BOEING

Parts produced and used by Boeing
Environmental control ducts
GEnx engine for dream liner and new 747 series
Forward fuselage for fuselage for the F/A-18E/F
3D scanning technology on 747 line
Brackets and Bearings
power feed driller used in SLS drill plate
32 different components for 787 dreamliner planes
Stock Market
Istanbul
Bejing
Seattle
New York
Rio de Janero
Paris
Financial Analysis
Los Angeles
Financial Analysis
Istanbul
Bejing
Sydney
Reference
Santa Barbara
Analysis:

Earnings are mainly cash-backed

High Return On Equity; Boeing used only $5,867 of equity compared to the $82,929 from liabilities.

High Net Operating Asset Turnover (21.71) but lower Net Operating Profit Margin (5.03%)

Return On Assets is 4.98%, the company gets $0.0498 for each $1 in assets. This number tells us that Boeing is very asset-intensive.

Company generates enough cash by “liquidating” current assets to pay current liabilities.
Trend Analysis:
•Using 2006 as our base year, net income has increased by 76%; however, in 2009 net income dropped below the base year by 41%.
Common size analysis:
•Boeing invests 4% on research and development whereas Lockheed only spends 1%. (These values are calculated as a percentage of sales)
•Boeing also makes a gross profit of 16% and Lockheed only makes 9%
COMPANY PROFILE
A manufacturing company operating in more than 100 countries
EMPLOYEES 313,000 PEOPLE WORLDWIDE
Headquarters in Fairfield,CT

Additive manufacturing in GE
A game changer for the company
GE has over 300 3D printers across the company
$27m lab set up to use 3D printing in aircraft engines.
In 2012, the company acquired Morris Technologies and its sister company Rapid Quality Manufacturing in Cincinnati, Ohio. Both companies specialized in additive manufacturing.
Sales of 3D printers and related services rose 29 percent in 2012, to $2.2 billion
developed a fuel nozzle for the LEAP engine that is up to 25 percent lighter
Laser Sintering titanium into complex shapes
Future implementations
GE will need to make around 25,000 nozzles annually within three years.
By 2020, more than 100,000 additive parts are expected to be in service
In 2016, GE will enter a new jet engine into service called the CFM LEAP—the first in GE’s line to incorporate 3D-printed parts.
GE plans to spend tens of millions of dollars to invest in new technology and, over the next five years
the future of GE may include 3D printing ceramics, piezoelectrics, piezoceramics, resistors, inductors, and capacitors
100,000 3D printed parts in service within GE (GE9X) and CFM (LEAP) engines by 2020
GE AVIATION
SWOT ANALYSIS

strength
Technical effectiveness
vast knowledge of improving technologies
diversity in the work place
GE9x and leap engine in future
strong market growing
acceptance of new ideas
Diversified Product Portfolio
excellent management

weakness
not having appropriate market research technology
loosing customers to new prospects for research and development
competitors honing in on vital market
Substantial Debt Burden

Threats
other competing companies
loss of economic resources
Since it is a powerful global brand, economic and political risks
Fluctuating currencies and economic recessions can affect global businesses severely
opportunities
association and correlation with niche markets
Creating global relationships
Increased Demand for Commercial Airplanes
ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING IN THE AEROSPACE INDUSTRY

THEN, NOW AND THE FUTURE…..


KAWAL DEEP SINGH OLUSOLA iYIOLA
991347497 991341735
FUTURE OF ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING


Revenues from Additive Manufacturing to Reach $805 Million by 2019
The Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II fighter reportedly will have 900 AM parts
The PW1500G engine in Bombardier C series will contain 24 additively manufactured metal parts when it enters service in 2015.
Aircraft manufacturers material consumption by 75%
Use of concept of selective laser melting
Honeywell exploits it to build heat exchangers and metal brackets
Pratt & Whitney is using the technique in making blades and vanes for compressors inside jet engine





We appreciate Prof Farzard Rayegani for the opportunity he gave us to explore this important sector and for believing in Us.

“3D printers are only equipment, but equipment doesn’t do much if you don’t know how to use it
Dr. Farzad Rayegani,

We would like to express our gratitude to Professor Femi Adegun who has helped and supported us throughout our process from initial advice and contacts in the early stages of conceptual inception & through ongoing advice & encouragement to this day
THANK YOU
Content
Introduction
Traditional vs Additive
A.M. in Aerospace
Focused Companies
Boeing
GE Aviations
The Future

BACKGROUND OF ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING IN BOEING
INVESTED HEAVILY IN AM
UTILIZING SLS SINCE 2002
77 RAPID MANUFACTURED LASER SINTERED PART DESIGNS ON FIVE SEPARATE AIRCRAFT PLATFORMS
HAS MANUFACTURED 20,000 FLYING PARTS WITHOUT ANY FAILURE
SWOT ANALYSIS
Strengths and Weaknesses
World's largest aerospace company
170 000 employees in 70 countries
28 000 suppliers and partners (strong network)
Robust focus on R&D
WEAKNESSES
Profit decreasing by 3,6 billion US$
Labor problems
SIGNIFICANT RELIANCE ON SUBCONTRACTORS AND SUPPLIERS
Complex supply chain
FINANCIALLY SOUND AND SHAHOLDER FRIENDLY
HIGHLY DEPENDENT ON U.S. GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS
BENEFITS OF USING AM
PRODUCTION
ELIMINATE NON RECURRING TOOLING COST
FASTER PART DELIVERY TIMES
SUPPLIER FLEXIBILITY
DIRECT FABRICATION
50% COST REDUCTION
67% CYCLE TIME REDUCTION
PRODUCT
REDUCE PART COUNT AND WEIGHT
LOWER INVENTORY AND TRANSPORTATION COST
IMPROVE LIFE CYCLE PRODUCT COST
strong market position in many of its business segments
INTERNATIONAL PRESENSE
OPPORTUNITIES
Increasing demand of commercial airplanes
Airplane servicing and modification
Expanding in the south east
Defense spending
International travel growth
THREATS
Credit market crisis
Decrease in western countries' defense spending
Competition
Increasing component's prices
Rising fuel costs
Slowdown in the commercial jet market
STRENGTH

Accounting Analysis
Forecasting
-The net operating profit margin (NOPM) = 5.03% (defined as NOPAT/Sales)
-The net operating asset turnover (NOAT) = 4.18 (defined as Sales/Yearend NOA (not the average NOA))
Full transcript