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Poetry-Cinquain, Quatrain, Haiku, Concrete

Literature that expresses ideas, feelings, or tells a story in a specific form
by

Sarah Thursby

on 30 April 2015

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Transcript of Poetry-Cinquain, Quatrain, Haiku, Concrete

Kinds of
Stanzas

Poetry Form
Form
Cinquain
Cinquains
Couplet
Quintet
Limerick
Haiku
The Language of
POETRY
FORM -
the appearance of the words on the page
LINE -
a group of words together on one line of poetry
Two line stanza
Five line stanza
There was an Old Man of Nantucket
Who kept all his cash in a bucket.
His daughter, called Nan,
Ran away with a man,
And as for the bucket, Nantucket.
Moths go flying by
They are very beautiful,
fluttering around.
Poetic Form
A word is dead
When it is said,
Some say.
FORM, LINE, & STANZA
Stanza -
a group of lines arranged together
One word
Two words
Three words
Four words
One word
Cinquain
>One word
>Two words
>Three words
>Four words
>One word
A type of literature that expresses
-ideas
-feelings
-tells a story in a specific form (usually using lines and stanzas)
Defining
Poetry

Create 3 Of Your Own Cinquain
Write 4
fun!

!
I say it just
Begins to live
That day.
Triplet (tarcet)
Three line stanza
Quatrain
Four line stanza
Sestet (Sextet)
Six line stanza
Septet
Seven line stanza
Octave
Eight line stanza
A _____ line poem .
A _____ stanza poem.
Street
Fought, Shot
Killing, Dealing, Smoking
Snakes will not prosper
Deceased
By: Elijah E.
spaghetti
messy, spicy
slurping, sliding, falling
between plate and mouth
delicious
>1 Noun
>2 Adjectives
>3 Action Verbs (-ing)
>4 word sentence
>1 Synonym ln. 1
Poems
funny, clever
interesting, informing, rhyming
A way to vent
music

By Marquan J.
1 Noun
2 Adjectives
3 Action Verbs (-ing)
4 word Full Sentence
1 Synonym ln. 1
>1 Noun
>2 Adjectives
>3 Action Verbs (-ing)
>4 word Full Sentence
>1 Synonym ln. 1
>1 Noun
>2 Adjectives
>3 Action Verbs (-ing)
>4 word Full Sentence
>1 Synonym ln. 1
Mules
Stubborn, Unmoving
Braying, kicking, resisting
Not wanting to listen,
People
You 1 Noun
quiet, smart 2 Adjectives
learning, listening, writing 3 Verbs (-ing)
do your work well 4 word Sentence
Student 1 Synonym ln. 1
Haiku by
Alex Knight
Haiku: Japanese Poetry
Haiku by
Unknown
Ln 1 - 5 Syllables
Ln 2 - 7 Syllables
Ln 3 - 5 Syllables
Created by Ms. Thursby
Japanese Poetry
Haiku Poetry
3 lines long
1 stanza poem
unique form
Exactly 17 syllables
Poetry and love
will fill your heart forever,
or rip it to shreds!
Poetic Form
5
7
5
The bee flies quickly
It turns around and stings me
then dies on the ground.
5
7
5
Stupid Chimpanzees
throwing your feces at me!
Go back up your tree.
Ln 1: ________________
Ln 2: ___________________
Ln 3: ________________
5 Syl
7 Syl
5 Syl

Haiku Themes!
5
7
5
Seasonal Theme: haikus usually contain one word, called a kigo, that expresses the season (Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter)
Sometimes the words in the poems are more clues instead of actual seasons!
Cinquain
What is the season
and the word that gives us this clue in the last Haiku?
Thematic Clue
Assignment:
Write 3 haiku poems!
2 about NATURE
1 about anything
***School appropriate!
Kinds of Stanzas
Couplet
Quintet
Two line stanza
Five line stanza
Triplet (Tarcet)
Three line stanza
Quatrain
Four line stanza
Sestet (Sextet)
Six line stanza
Septet
Seven line stanza
Octave
Eight line stanza
Raise your hand to tell me the
name of the stanza used in HAIKU!!
TRIPLET (tarcet)
3 line stanza!

The leaves are crunching
and the heart breaks through the wall-
So sad when we fall.
Student-Created Poetry
Concrete/Shape
Poetry

\ A fox head I do see beneath me /
\ /
\ with very /
\ cunning eyes and /
\ and sly /
\ smiling /
\ lips. /
\ He /
\ stares /
\ at /
\ his /
\ M /
\ E /
\ A /
\ L /
\ ! /
\ /


Created by Ms. Thursby 12/7/2011
Concrete poetry
also known as SHAPE POETRY
typographical arrangement is as important in conveying the intended effect as meaning of words, rhythm, rhyme, and so on!
Create 3 concrete poems of your own
Diamonds
sparkling,
shining,
and
PErfeCT
O O
O O
O O
O O
O O
O O
O O
I LOVE YOU
Syllable
Sestet/Sextet
Form
Octave
Kigo
Stanza
Quintet
Cinquain
Triplet
Couplet
Synonym
Haiku
Septet
Syllables in Haiku
Another word for
Shape poetry
Poetry Quiz #1 Review
Ode Poetry
An ODE is a lyric poem of moderate length, usually containing a SERIOUS or MEDITATIVE nature.
The ode can praise or memorialize people, the arts of music and poetry, natural scenes, or abstract concepts.
The person, place, or object is
identified in the TITLE of the poem.
An ode is no shorter than 10 lines long!
They are usually meant to be sang or said with
rhythm.
Lines in an ODE rhyme!
It doesn't matter what the rhyme scheme is,
but your ode needs to have at least
2 LINES PER STANZA that rhyme.
Example of an ODE

Ode to the Dinosaurs

I sing of those who failed to make the Ark;
Who would have made that cockleshell capsize.
Despite their comeback in Jurassic Park
Still abject failures in most people’s eyes.
Absurd monstrosities – vast bulk, long necks,
Thick skins, huge jaws, and brains the size of peas –
“No wonder that they didn’t make the grade!
Tyrannosaurus Rex?
Rex, meaning king? It ruled the world? Oh please!
Mankind’s achievements put theirs in the shade!”

It’s true that they are dead, and we are not,
And yet… how long did they bestride the Earth?
Their intellects perhaps were not so hot,
And yet… how much is brainpower really worth?
For isn’t it the source of all our fears,
And of our speciocide the likely cause?
This culture we’re so proud of has survived
A mere few thousand years.
Compare that to the pea-brained dinosaurs -
A hundred million years or more they thrived.
Such stupid creatures didn’t have a hope
When Earth collided with an asteroid.
And if that happened now, how would we cope?
Not well. In fact, we too would be destroyed,
No matter that we’re thin-skinned and short-necked,
With larger brains. The ignoramus mocks,
But I maintain the dinosaurs should be
Remembered with respect.
They left their imprint in the very rocks;
Descendants of them sing in every tree.
A
B
A
B
C
D
E
C
D
E
F
G
F
G
H
I
J
H
I
J
K
L
K
L
M
N
O
M
N
O
A common rhyme scheme per stanza is: ABABCDECDE
Ode to a Superhero
by Weird Al Yankovic

Poor Peter Parker was pitiful
Couldn't have been any shyer
Mary Jane still wouldn't notice him
Even if his hair was on fire

But then one day he went to that science lab
That mutated spider came down
Oh, and now Peter crawls over everyone's walls
And he's swingin' all over town

La li la, li de da
La la, li le la da dum

Sling us a web, you're the Spider-Man
Sling us a web tonight
'Cause we're all in the mood for a hero now
And there's evil doers to fight

Now Harry the rich kid's a friend of his
Who horns in on Mary Jane
But to his great surprise it seems she prefers guys
Who can kiss upside down in the rain

"With great power comes great responsibility"
That's the catch phrase of old Uncle Ben
If you missed it, don't worry, they'll say the line
Again and again and again

Oh, la la la, di de da
La la, di di da da dum

Now Norman's a billionaire scientist
Who never had time for his son
But then something went screwy and before you knew he
Was trying to kill everyone

And he's ridin' around on that glider thing
And he's throwin' that weird pumpkin bomb
Yes, he's wearin' that dumb Power Rangers mask
But he's scarier without it on

Sling us a web, you're the Spider-Man
Sling us a web tonight
'Cause you're brave and you're strong and so limber now
But where'd you come up with those tights?

It's a pretty sad day at the funeral
Norman Osborn has bitten the dust
And I heard Harry said he wants Spider-Man dead
Aw, but his buddy Pete he can trust

Oh, and M.J. is all hot for Peter now
Aw, but Peter, he just shuts her down
Mary Jane, don't you cry, you can give it a try
Again when the sequal comes 'round

Oh, la la la, di de da
La la, di di da da dum

Sling us a web, you're the Spider-Man
Sling us a web tonight
'Cause we all sure could use us a hero now
And we think that you'll do all right
Ode to Toilet


In sickness I have sought
your cooling grace
and you have received
without question or shame
the parts of my being
that I could no longer contain.

You have soothed
the cramping of my bar-torn body,
supported the thorough cleansing
of my noisy soul
when no one else would listen.

You have tolerated
all the vile projectiles
I could hurl,
always remaining constant
refreshing my view of life
allowing catharsis
epitomizing receptivity.

Oh Goddess of the Toilet
I thank you
Your job: Create 2 odes following the steps:

1. Choose a topic (one outside)
2. Plan the structure (what's the end product?)
3. Rhyme poem can be ABABCDECDE
4. 10 line minimum
-Can be 2 separate odes of 10 lines each
5. Title your poem "Ode to ______"
Ode to Teachers

Thank you for being there for me:
You've given me the ultimate gift.
You spent your money on that amazing degree,
just so students aren't set adrift.
Now if it sounds like I'm sucking up,
all you have to do is ask.
I'm truly not! Their sacrifice is something to discuss
If I still haven't swayed your mind, silly pup,
Well, you can kiss my ... A+.

You have to appreciate your power to learn!
These people are here for the community.
The kids in Africa only yearn
for such a great opportunity.
What you do is excellent.
Don't ever forget!
Love, kindness, and care -
you really are a Godsend.
Whenever we make you upset,
just know we haven't learned to appreciate you yet. I swear.

Jacob Pleschourt 4/20/2015
Ode to Furry Things

Furry things all over the world...
Men, pets, and even my girl.
I see them here, I see them there,
I see furry things everywhere.
It costs extra to get a haircut,
they have hair on their face, their back,
and even their butt!
You see them in zoos,
you see them in the streets
You see them with their boyfriends,
their boyfriends are creeps.

By Saul
Dylan C.
Penetrating pain,
perplexing power,
Fascinating Fame,
Frusterating founder.
Hobson K.
Tiny Tim's ticking clock
ticks the time it takes
tall Tommy to walk the tower.

Tiny Tim's ticking clock
ticks the time it takes Tim to travel
to tall Tommy's town.
Marcus H.
The cats hissed in a stable
the cats hissed under the table.
Unable to catch a mouse
that came out of a house
the mouse bounced
in the cats hissing mouth.
Guy M.
Prison
Cells, Hell
repeating, sleeping, hurting
I would press restart
Life
Sour
Colorful
Crunchy
Sweet
Loving
Delicious
Tasty
Delightful
W
H
I
T
E
H
A
R
D
P
L
A
I
N
D
I
R
T
Y
POP
By Artavies M. (6th Hr)
Poetic Forms -
Free Verse
Free Verse by Robert Graves

I now delight

In spite

Of the might

And the right

Of classic tradition,

In writing

And reciting

Straight ahead,

Without let or omission,

Just any little rhyme

In any little time

That runs in my head;

Because, I’ve said,

My rhymes no longer shall stand arrayed

Like Prussian soldiers on parade

That march,

Stiff as starch,

Foot to foot,

Boot to boot,

Blade to blade,

Button to button,

Cheeks and chops and chins like mutton.

No! No!

My rhymes must go

Turn ’ee, twist ’ee,

Twinkling, frosty,

Will-o’-the-wisp-like, misty;
5
Form =>
1
Cherry blossoms commonly denote spring
mosquitoes are used for summer
snow portrays winter
Limerick Poetry
Limericks
-Popular form in children's verse
-Often comical, nonsensical, and lewd
-Well known as Mother Goose Nursery rhymes (1791)
Limericks - Rhyme Scheme
1st two lines rhyme
third and fourth rhyme together
fifth either repeats first or rhymes with it
1) - / - - / - - / (A)
2) - / - - / - - / (A)
3) - / - - / (B)
4) - / - - / (B)
5) - / - - / - - / (A)
Dashes = weak syllables
Back slashes = stresses
Edward Lear's
Book of Nonsense
(1846)
There was an Old Man with a beard,
Who said, “It is just as I feared!
Two Owls and a Hen,
Four Larks and a Wren,
Have all built their nests in my beard!”
There was a Young Lady whose chin
Resembled the point of a pin:
So she had it made sharp,
And purchased a harp,
And played several tunes with her chin.
- Edward Lear
There once was a young lady named bright
Whose speed was much faster than light
She set out one day
In a relative way
And returned on the previous night.
- Anonymous
Limerick Examples
Your turn!
Write 2 limericks of your own.
- / - - / - - / (A) (8 syllables)
- / - - / - - / (A) (8 syllables)
- / - - / (B) (5 syllables)
- / - - / (B) (5 syllables)
- / - - / - - / (A) (8 syllables)
Be careful: these poems can become "dumb"
There once was a fish who could talk.
He wanted to learn how to walk.
He jumped from the sea,
Fell right onto me,
And I nearly died from great shock.
-Anonymous
There once was a squishy, young pear
who had ugly, fluffy white hair
He once liked to roll
so was put in a bowl
where he grew new hair for his pear.
There once was a ball playing man
who had an unusual tan
When he got a touchdown
the sun lit his crown
and he blinded the fans in the stand.
Digital Poetry
Digital Poetry
Electronic literature
Wide range of poetic approaches
Crucial use of COMPUTERS
Ways to display poetry:
CD-ROM
DVD
Installations in Art Gallery
World Wide Web
Internet
Digital Poetry AKA e-poetry
Relatively new
Most written since the 1990s
Billy Collins
"Forgetfulness"
The name of the author is the first to go
followed obediently by the title, the plot,
the heartbreaking conclusion, the entire novel
which suddenly becomes one you have never read, never even heard of,

as if, one by one, the memories you used to harbor
decided to retire to the southern hemisphere of the brain,
to a little fishing village where there are no phones.

Long ago you kissed the names of the nine muses goodbye
and watched the quadratic equation pack its bag,
and even now as you memorize the order of the planets,

something else is slipping away, a state flower perhaps,
the address of an uncle, the capital of Paraguay.

Whatever it is you are struggling to remember,
it is not poised on the tip of your tongue
or even lurking in some obscure corner of your spleen.

It has floated away down a dark mythological river
whose name begins with an L as far as you can recall

well on your own way to oblivion where you will join those
who have even forgotten how to swim and how to ride a bicycle.

No wonder you rise in the middle of the night
to look up the date of a famous battle in a book on war.
No wonder the moon in the window seems to have drifted
out of a love poem that you used to know by heart.
Rhyming Poetry
Rhyme Scheme -
Pattern of rhymes at end of line
Denoted by using letters for matching rhymes
ababcc
aabbcc
Rhyming Poetry
An ember sparked will softly glow,
and fed by fuel, will grow and grow.
I once was cinder, sparked by you,
first timid. . . till the flames then grew.

And so our start was touch of dawn,
with amber hue, for I was drawn
to eyes so welcoming and warm
I never guessed you’d do me harm.

Like morning glory, love in June
the rapture of mid-afternoon,
romance of which the ancients wrote,
our passion had no antidote.

And with the dusk, though scarlet tinged,
our love began to come unhinged,
for clouds arrived, which filled your eyes, extinguishing bright twilight skies.
With cold of night came shadows’ pall,
and I could not tear down your wall.
By midnight’s hour, the fire was dead.
Mere ashes smoldered in its stead.

You left, and should you reappear,
I’ve vowed to shun you. Now I fear
the very thing for which I yearn -
one touch. . . and then again - to burn.
Cinder Girl
by Andrea Dietrich
Rhyming Poetry Cont'd
Bear in There
by Shel Silverstein
There's a Polar Bear
In our Frigidaire--
He likes it 'cause it's cold in there.
With his seat in the meat
And his face in the fish
And his big hairy paws
In the buttery dish,
He's nibbling the noodles,
He's munching the rice,
He's slurping the soda,
He's licking the ice.
And he lets out a roar
If you open the door.
And it gives me a scare
To know he's in there--
That Polary Bear
In our Fridgitydaire.
aabb
ccdd
Rhyme Scheme
eeff
gghh
iijj
kkll
Spoken Word Poetry
1. Choose subject (have attitude)

2. Pick your poetic devices (repetition, rhyme, beat)

3. Performance (eye contact, projection, enunciation)

4. Memorization (or fake it)

5. Power poetry - must be spoken on screen or off by YOU
Sonnets
What is a sonnet?
14 lines
Strict rhyme scheme
Written in iambic pentameter
Sonnet Characteristics:
14 lines -
broken down into 4 quatrains
Rhyme scheme -
Shakespearean sonnet: abab cdcd efef gg
Iambic Pentameter -
10 beats per line, alternating unstressed and stressed syllables
The Sonnet and its Quatrains:
1st Quatrain - establish the subject
2nd Quatrain - develop a theme
Number of lines: 4
Rhyme: ABAB
Number of lines: 4
Rhyme: CDCD
3rd Quatrain - round off the theme
Number of lines: 4
Rhyme: EFEF
4th Quatrain - conclude the sonnet
Number of lines: 2
Rhyme: GG
Iambic Pentameter
In Review: Iambic Pentameter
Iam -
Metrical foot consisting of 2 syllables (unstressed then stressed: daDUM)
Penta -
Means 5
Meter is regular rhythmic pattern
Like 5 heartbeats -
daDUM daDUM daDUM daDUM daDUM

Sonnet 18
by William Shakespeare
Two households, both alike in dignity,
In fair Verona, where we lay our scene,
From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,
Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.
From forth the fatal loins of these two foes
A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life;
Whose misadventured piteous overthrows
Do with their death bury their parents' strife.
The fearful passage of their death-mark'd love,
And the continuance of their parents' rage,
Which, but their children's end, nought could remove,
Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage;
The which if you with patient ears attend,
What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.
Romeo and Juliet: Prologue
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date:

Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed,
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed:

But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st,

So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.
A
B
A
B
C
D
C
D
E
F
E
F
G
G
Non-Shakespearean Sonnets
Acquainted With The Night
by Robert Frost

I have been one acquainted with the night.
I have walked out in rain—and back in rain.
I have outwalked the furthest city light.

I have looked down the saddest city lane.
I have passed by the watchman on his beat
And dropped my eyes, unwilling to explain.

I have stood still and stopped the sound of feet
When far away an interrupted cry
Came over houses from another street,

But not to call me back or say good-by;
And further still at an unearthly height,
One luminary clock against the sky

Proclaimed the time was neither wrong nor right.
I have been one acquainted with the night.
Ozymandias
by Percy Bysshe Shelley

I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,

And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed;

And on the pedestal these words appear:
"My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!"
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay

Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.
Your turn!
Write 1 Shakespearean Sonnet.

-14 lines (3 quatrains and 1 couplet)
-10 syllables per line

-Rhyme Scheme: ABAB CDCD EFEF GG

-In each stanza:
1. Establish the subject
2. Develop the theme
3. Round off the theme
4. Conclude the sonnet
See the full transcript