Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Mascil conference 2014

No description
by

Justin Dillon

on 10 June 2017

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Mascil conference 2014

“We learnt all these amazing things in year 7 that we’d never heard of before, like molecules and atoms and electrons. I don’t know about you guys but I got really excited about it, I rushed home and told my mum about it.”
And then in year 9, we’re doing the same thing, year 10, doing the same thing, year 11, doing the same thing….. and it’s so repetitive.
End
92 student (Y6) interviews
85 student (Y8) interviews
75 parent interviews
11 schools (Y6)
41 schools (Y8)
Phase 1 - Autumn/Winter 2010 (Y6 - age 10)
Phase 2 - Autumn 2011 (Y8 - age 12)
Phase 3 - Autumn 2012 (Y9 - age 13)

248 state: 31 independent schools
73.8% of students agreed or strongly agreed that they learn interesting things in science lessons

58.1% agreed or strongly agreed that ‘science lessons are exciting’
72.4% believed that their parents think it is important to learn science

58.6% asserted that their parents think science is interesting
76.7% of students agreed or strongly agreed that scientists and people who work in science can make a difference in the world

66.2% believed that scientists make a lot of money

60.3% agreed that scientists are respected by people in this country
28.5% of students claimed they would like to have a job using science

16.6% agreed that they wanted to become a scientist
•parental attitudes to science

•attitudes towards school science

•self-concept in science

•gender

•ethnicity
Aspires

Prof Louise Archer
Prof Jonathan Osborne
Prof Justin Dillon
Dr Jen DeWitt
Dr Billy Wong
Mrs Beatrice Willis
And then in year 9, we’re doing the same thing, year 10, doing the same thing, year 11, doing the same thing….. and it’s so repetitive.
And then in year 9, we’re doing the same thing, year 10, doing the same thing, year 11, doing the same thing….. and it’s so repetitive.
And then in year 9, we’re doing the same thing, year 10, doing the same thing, year 11, doing the same thing….. and it’s so repetitive.
Science departments with a positive ethos, in which staff enjoy working collaboratively and students enjoy spending time and effort, are more likely to teach the sciences well (including the effective use of practical work) and to offer more out-of-class activities.


The role of informal science institutions in teacher education

Justin Dillon

Touching
Hearing
Moving
Sensing
Fearing
Laughing
etc.
Describing
Explaining
Predicting
Arguing
Critiquing
Defining
etc.
Impact of museum visits seems to be greater when...

Control
Choice
Challenge
Collaboration

Paris, S. G. (1998). Situated motivation and informal learning, Journal of Museum Education, 22(2/3), pp. 22-26.
Do we portray scientists as special people or scientists as ordinary people?
the scope and limits of an individual’s aspirations and ‘choices’ are shaped by the wider social structures within which they are located
Six girls were characterized as performing identities that fitted within a repertoire of ‘feminine science identity’. The ‘feminine scientist’ discourse is characterized by attempts to ‘balance’ an identification with science with performances of ‘appropriate’ (‘restrained’, not excessive (Skeggs 2004)) heteronormative femininity.

In other words, the Otherness of girls’ performances of ‘clever’ science identities is offset by their simultaneous performances of conventional femininity: that is, they ‘do’ science identities through ‘girling’.
Like Renold’s (2005) ‘square-girls’ who are ‘high-achieving, hard-working, rule-following and lacked any interest in popular fashion or ‘boys’ either as friends or boyfriends’ (p.64), the ‘Bluestocking’ girls in our study constructed themselves (and were described by their parents) as ‘non-girly’ and preoccupied with academic success.
e: justin.dillon@bristol.ac.uk
T: @justindillonUoB

A key reason is a widespread lack of ‘science capital’ among pupils and their families.
Science capital refers to science-related qualifications, interest, understanding (‘scientific literacy’) and contacts.
Evidence also indicates that girls have to do more ‘identity work’ to balance science aspirations with femininity because science careers tend to be associated with masculinity.
Middle-class families tend to be better equipped to foster and support their children’s science aspirations.
BUT
Phase I (2009/11)
9,319 students aged 10/11 (Year 6) in England
279 primary schools (248 state and 31 independent schools)

Phase II (2011/12)
5,634* students aged 12/13 (Year 8)
69 secondary schools (58 state and 11 independent schools)
*711 took part in Phase I and II survey
Favourite subject?
High STEM aspirations linked to:
What research questions might the following people have:
a) Aquarium education staff?
b) Science education researcher?
c) Policy-maker?
Young people’s motivations and career choices
The complementary roles of school and museum settings for learning
Science and the adult public
The impact of science learning experiences in museum settings
Dialogue and the deficit model – ‘public understanding of science and the democratic process’
The role of museum science learning – improvements to understanding and/or changes to attitudes?
‘Authentic’ experiences
Professionalising the practitioners

Young people’s motivations and career choices
The complementary roles of formal and informal settings for learning
Science and the adult public
The impact of science learning experiences in informal settings
Dialogue and the deficit model – ‘public understanding of science and the democratic process’
The role of informal science learning – improvements to understanding and/or changes to attitudes?
‘Authentic’ experiences
Professionalising the practitioners
What would a blended pedagogy look like?
What image of science and mathematics do we want to encourage?
Langley Academy
UK

'Museum learning school'

£23m
4. A blended pedagogy?
What kind of lab would the public like?
Question 4:
Should science engagement in schools be more like it is in museums?
Amy Seakins, King's College London/NHM
Translating your research for practitioners is hard (and expensive)
Q. What can we do to improve science education in school?

A. Do more science out of school
Take-home message 5:
Museum explainers can learn from school science research
Collaborative projects involving museums and university researchers will become increasingly important (and better funded)

Describing
Explaining
Predicting
Arguing
Critiquing
Defining
etc.

What's museum pedagogy?
Science is about asking questions
5. Issues and ideas
Read it
Write it
Draw it
Talk it
Do it
Reflective (Personal)
Reflexive (Internal)
Critically reflexive (External)
What can science educators do to help?

1. Focus science engagement on young children

2. Help them to realise that science opens doors

3. Support students who want to do science - particularly girls
'Science and mathematics are something special done by special people in special places', or, 'Science and mathematics are something ordinary done by ordinary people in ordinary places'?
Families constitute the single greatest source of influence on 10-14 year-olds’ aspirations.
A key reason is a widespread lack of ‘science capital’ among pupils and their families.
Science capital refers to science-related qualifications, interest, understanding (‘scientific literacy’) and contacts.
0. Experience of scaling-up
1. What's the challenge?
2. Interest or identity?
3. What do museums, etc. offer?
4. A blended pedagogy?
5. Issues and ideas
0. Scaling up
Permantapan Kerja Guru (PKG):
Strengthening of the Work of Teachers

‘From the teacher, by the teacher, and for the teacher’

Funded by: World Bank and UNDP

Instructors chosen from the ‘best teachers’ at junior high and senior high schools in each of the [then] 27 provinces

12 week courses overseas + workshops in Indonesia

Instructors then taught in their own classrooms for a semester

16-week in-service/on-service courses

2 weeks in-service - teachers' centre
8 weeks on-service - in-school coaching
2 weeks in-service - teachers' centre
8 weeks on-service - in-school coaching

Outstanding participants became Assistant Instructors

Science programme began in 1980
Extended to mathematics in 1982
To English in 1985
To Bahasa Indonesian in 1988
1. What's the challenge?
2. Interest or identity?
3. What do museums, etc. offer?
Formed the basis of the professional development approach used by;
Cognitive Acceleration through Science Education (CASE)
Cognitive Acceleration through Mathematics Education (CAME)
What's the way forward?
The first study was a large‐scale survey with 475 ISIs responding about the programmes they offer schools and teachers beyond one‐day field trips. A large majority of ISIs (73%) reported having one or more of these programmes, with more than one‐half (59%) providing one or more forms of teacher PD.
Full transcript