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Got Plot?

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by

Kristin Gilbert

on 18 September 2016

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Transcript of Got Plot?

Got Plot?
Let's get serious for a moment
With a nearby partner, brainstorm and come up with a list of things that make a roller coaster "good"!
A GOOD novel is like a GOOD roller coaster...
Is this how you would want to look within the FIRST few sections of a roller coaster ride?
The SIX Elements of Plot
That's where the PLOT comes in...
Plot:
the events that make up a story.
A Roller Coaster Ride through the Elements of Plot
Learning Objectives:
Today, we will:
1. Identify and understand the six elements of a plot.

2. Understand that in a well-written novel or story, the progression of events is carefully placed.

3. Practice identifying the plot elements in Pixar short films.
Now, let's go for a QUICK RIDE
Discussion Questions:
1. What makes a roller coaster ride fun?

2. Would it be as exciting if a roller coaster traveled along a LONG, FLAT track? Why or why not?

3. How would you feel if the BIG drops or loops came right at the VERY beginning of the ride?
Probably NOT!
With that being said, authors don't want readers to look like this after reading the first few pages of a novel either.
Important:
These events follow an order!
a well-written plot is like a




well-designed roller coaster!
Big Idea:
Why is it so important for a story to follow the particular sequence of "plot elements" on a plot roller coaster?
Critical
Thinking
In other words, why can't I write a story where the climax comes before the rising action?
...and how they correlate to a roller coaster ride!
Exposition
Think about it:
Look at where the exposition is placed on the roller coaster track. Predict the purpose of the exposition within the plot.
Was your prediction close?
The
background information
characters
setting
exposition
How does the exposition correlate with a roller coaster ride?
A roller coaster can't be enjoyed unless
you GET ON IT!







Before you can get to this, you must stand in line and observe the ride, get buckled in, and wait.
Initiating Event
Rising Action
Think about it:
Look at the place where the rising action is located on the roller coaster track. Predict the purpose of the rising action within the plot.
Was your prediction close?
Usually the longest section of a novel, the includes events in which the
story is building
more than one
rising action
How does the rising action correlate with a roller coaster ride?
It is that long, typically slow hill that all roller coasters climb.


As the coaster crawls up the hill, the suspense and excitement builds within the riders!
Climax
Think about it:
Look at the place where the climax is located on the roller coaster track. Predict the purpose of the climax within the plot.
Was your prediction close?
The is
turning point
most exciting moment
How does the climax correlate with a roller coaster ride?
climax
Think about it:
Look at where the initiating event is positioned on the track. Predict its purpose within a story.
Was your prediction close?
The
starts the problem!
the conflict
initiating event
How does the initiating event correlate with a roller coaster ride?
The ride begins to move and you are about to climb the hill!


We've reached the top! The highest point of the track


and there is NOWHERE to go but DOWN! Riders' stomachs are full of those butterflies!
Falling Action
Think about it:
Look at the place where the falling action is located on the roller coaster track. Predict the purpose of the falling action within the plot.
Was your prediction correct?
The includes
events that near the end
falling action
How does the falling action correlate with a roller coaster ride?
The suspense is over and you can enjoy the exciting ride down the hill!






Put your hands up and enjoy all the things you experience on the way down!
Resolution
Think about it:
Look at where the resolution is located on the track. Predict the purpose of the resolution within the plot.
Was your prediction correct?
The is the
conclusion
resolution
How does the resolution correlate with a roller coaster?
You've SURVIVED the roller coaster!


You're back on flat ground and ready to exit the ride!
Wasn't that FUN!?
We do - Let's apply what we've learned!

Practice Activity #1
1. Watch the Pixar short film "Lifted"

2. As you watch, look for clues that indicate the different elements found on the plot roller coaster.


With your group, complete the plot roller coaster diagram located on the BACK of your notes.
Can you figure it out?
Which example below is of a
strong
plot? Which one is
weak
?
Example #1
Example #2
Joe goes for a walk in the woods. He enjoys his leisurely hike. He surveys the plant and animal life around him. He finishes his walk and goes home.
Joe goes for a walk in the woods. Before long, he comes across a snake that strikes at him from the side of the trail. He narrowly escapes the snake and hurries down the trail only to find himself a few feet from a black bear. He manages to sneak away without gaining the bear's attention, but as he continues down the path and comes to a crossroads, he discovers that he dropped his map during his flight and now has no idea which way to turn.
Joe goes for a walk in the woods. Before long, he comes across a snake that strikes at him from the side of the trail. He narrowly escapes the snake and hurries down the trail only to find himself a few feet from a black bear. He manages to sneak away without gaining the bear's attention, but as he continues down the path and comes to a crossroads, he discovers that he dropped his map during his flight and now has no idea which way to turn.
Example #2
is a strong plot!
In
Example #1
, there was no conflict, no action, and therefore, no real story. IT was just a boring list of events!
Example #2,
however, is full of ups and downs. It sets up our characters and setting at the beginning, and get into a bunch of ups and downs during his walk - just like a roller coaster.
Practice Activity - I do
Ms. Gilbert will model what you will do
1. Watch the Pixar short film "Dug's Special Mission"

2. As you watch, think about the different plot elements on your roller coaster plot notes.
As Ms. Gilbert models her think aloud of creating a plot roller coaster for "Dug's Special Mission," record what she writes on your paper.
YOU do - GRADED PRACTICE #2
Let's see what YOU can do on your own
1. Watch the Pixar short film "Presto"

2. Complete the plot diagram for the film ON YOUR OWN. Use your other plot notes as a guide!
On your OWN, complete the plot diagram for "Presto"
One more "We Do"
1. Watch Pixar's "Partly Cloudy" and make a list of the events that happen in order.

2. Complete the PLOT DIAGRAM for the film.
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