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Principles of 3D Design

Launching the Imagination (textbook)
by

3D Design

on 2 April 2014

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Transcript of Principles of 3D Design

Intro
Combining Unifying Forces
Balance
Composition: A combo of multiple parts into a unified whole; all elements work together.
dialogue between positive and negative forms
opposing forces add vitality rather than causing confusion
each part contributes to a whole.
Using the components of unity to create a unique composition.
Refers to the distribution of weight or force among visual units.
Unity & Variety
Increasing Variety
Degrees of Unity
Grid and Matrix
Scale & Proportion
Emphasis
Emphasis: gives particular prominence to a part of a design
-focal point: the compositional device used to create emphasis
-emphasis and focal point are used to attract attention and create a strong visual and conceptual impact
Emphasis by Isolation
Emphasis through Contrast
PRINCIPALS
of
3 Dimensional Design

Repetition and Rhythm
Repetition-using the same visual element or effect any number of times within a composition





Rhythm-the organization of the
elements or effects into a
deliberate pattern
Repetition and Rhythm can be found in Tanija & Graham Carr's
Untitled
, 2001, through the clockwise, and then counter clockwise movement of the woven leather.
Scale: size of an object when compared to human size
-small scale: can be hand-held
-human scale: our size
-monumental scale: large objects and installations

Proportion: relative size of objects within an image.
Choosing the right scale and proportion can affect expressive power.
Three major types of balance:
Symmetrical balance:
Forms are mirrored on either side of central axis

Radial Symmetry:
Design elements extend out from a central point, as with the spokes of a wheel

Asymmetrical balance:
Creates equilibrium among visual elements that do not mirror each other on either side of an axis
-Contrast is created when two or more forces operate in opposition.
-Powerful compositions can be made with the right combinations of adversaries;
static/dynamic, smooth/textured, small/large, and curvilinear/rectilinear.
-an
anomaly
or breaking from the norm, to make something stand out

-we seek to connect verbal and visual information we are given, a mismatched word or isolated object may be used to attract attention
The
ELEMENTS
of design are the building blocks from which compositions are made.
The
PRINCIPLES
of design describe the ways these building blocks can be combined.
(oneness)
(difference)
Increasing unity- evidence of deliberation and order tend to increase unity.
Grouping
by location, orientation, shape & color
Containment
encourages seeking connections among visual units/ Horn: blocks unified statement despite their random distribution
.
Proximity - distance btwn visual units/ Nevelson: even the most disperate forms can become unified when they are placed in close proximity.
Continuity-
fluid connection among comp. parts when placed in close proximity.
Repetition-
same visual elements within a composition.
Closure-
the minds inclination to connect fragmenting into to produce a completed form.
- to convey an idea through suggestion rather than description
-when the viewer completes the image in his/her mind, it is often more memorable than an explicit image.
Difference in any aspect of a design increases variety, for example:
Compositional choices must support our conceptual intentions.
Line Quality: using lines of different diameter (thickness)
Texture: combine smooth an rough textures to add energy
Pattern: using symmetrical balance, or cross-hatching
Some designs require a high level of unity while others require increased variety. ex: The only significant variation is the contrast between interior and exterior textures.
A
grid
is created through a series of intersecting lines. A
matrix
is a
three-dimensional grid.
Both can unify a design by creating containment, continuity, and proximity.
Grouping
visual units and sub groups by location, orientation & shape. This triangularly shaped group can be split by the bleachers into two subgroups, with the tallest figure providing a visual exclamation.
Juan Muñoz, Many Times, 2000, wood, resin and mixed media, approx 6x12x3 ft.
Roni Horn, How Dickinson Stayed Home, 1993, solid aluminum and plastic. 26 cubes, ea. 3x3x3 in.
The blocks make a unified statement despite their random distribution
.

The room CONTAINS the alphabet

Containment
encourages seeking connections among visual units.
Proximity
- distance btwn visual units/ Nevelson: even the most disperate forms can become unified when they are placed in close proximity.
Continuity-
fluid connection among comp. parts when placed in close proximity.
Repetition-
same visual elements within a composition.
Closure-
the minds inclination to connect fragmented parts to produce a completed form.

- to convey an idea through suggestion rather than description

-when the viewer completes the image in his/her mind, it is often more memorable than an explicit image.
Zac Freeman,
Steve
, 2006. Found objects on a board, 60x48in.
Vik Muniz, from the series
Pictures of Garbage
, 2008. Recyclable goods at Jardim Gramacho, what was once the largest open-air dump and landfill in Rio de Jinero. Featured in the film
Wasteland
.
Chuck Close,
Lucas
, 1986–87, oil and graphite on canvas; 100 x 84 in
Eva Hesse, Accession II, 1967, Galvanized steel, rubber tubing, 30x30x30in.

Sol LeWitt, Untitled, 1965 (60" X 60" X 60")

http://radicalart.info/AlgorithmicArt/grid/minimal/Empty/

Ron Mueck (Australian, b. 1958). In Bed, 2005. Mixed media, 5 x 21 x 13 ft
Constantin Brancusi,
Maiastra
, 1912, Brass, 30x7x7in,
Golden Bird
, 1919, Bronze, 37in+48in base,
Bird in Space
, 1928, Bronze, 54x8x6in
Arnaldo Pomodoro, Sphere Within Sphere, 1965. Bronze, 45x46x47 ft., Dublin, Ireland.
Alexander Calder,
Rouge Triomphant
, 1963, sheet metal, rod & paint 9 x 19 x 15 ft
woven leather, acrylic paint, 13x9x29in.
Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation by Lynne Truss
Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation by Lynne Truss
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