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The Passionate Shepherd to His Love doe <3

this is totally plagiarised
by

karl m

on 23 October 2013

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Transcript of The Passionate Shepherd to His Love doe <3

The Passionate Shepherd to His Love
Tone
The tone of this poem is rather exaggerated, enormous representation of one's love to another. The poem is basically romantic, where the author uses many different metaphors to demonstrate what kind of love the protagonist is willing to give. His tone is merely glorifying his love in different ways.
Rhyme Scheme
The structure of the poem is couplet (aabb)
"kirtle/myrtle"
Eye Rhyme:
Looks like it will rhyme but doesn't
"love/prove"
Internal Rhyme:
Words rhyming within the same sentence
"thee/me"
Slant/Near Rhyme
sounds similar but not perfect
"roses/posies"
Figurative Language
Scansion
The scansion of the poem is in iambic form
Almost each foot is in the order of unstressed, then stressed syllable.
The rhythm poem is written in iambic tetrameter, whereas each verse has 4 unstressed syllables, each followed by stressed syllables, totaling up to 8 syllables per verse.
There's an irregularity in the scansion in stanza 3, lines 9-12, whereas the iambic tetrameter is broken. Instead of the 8 syllable verses, lines 9 & 11 have 9 syllables.
This change of rhythm changes the scansion of the poem as it goes from iambic to trochaic.
Diction
Born in Canterbury, England, in 1564
His writing career only lasted 6 years out of his 29 year life
Known for many poems his most famous being The Passionate Shepherd to His Love
Christopher Marlowe
Alliteration:
And
we will
all the pleasures prove - Verse 2
And see the shepherds
feed
their
flocks
- Verse 6
Which from our
pretty
lambs we
pull
- Verse 14
A
belt
of straw and ivy
buds
- Verse 17
With
coral clasps
and amber studs - Verse 18
And if these pleasures
may
thee
move
- Verse 19
The
shepherd

swains

shall
dance and
sing
- Verse 25
For thy delight each
May-morning
- Verse 26
If these delights thy
mind may move
- Verse 27



Theme:
So What?
The structure of the iambic tetrameter makes the rhythm of the poem smooth and regular, for the purpose of attraction to the poem through the ears– making it sound euphonious.
The Parable of the Prodigal Son:
Imagery
The imagery's presence throughout the poem's purpose is for the author to paint a picture for the audience, and to appeal to the audience's senses.

First Stanza
In the first stanza, the imagery only starts from the 3rd verse. The author paints a picture using diction: "...hills and valleys, dale and field... craggy mountains yield." These lines relate to the extended metaphor that is found throughout the poem, which is the 'shepherd's field of love'.

The meaning of the imagery present in these lines is that the narrator promises to bring pleasure that is similar to the pleasure of the hills, valleys, etc.
Second Stanza
In the second stanza, the narrator describes how peaceful they will make their soon-to-be lover feel, and also describing what they will do together. His image of nature is pacifying and relaxing, and his diction is euphonious.

This euphonious diction sets a peaceful mood for the rest of the stanza.

Love Poetry Analysis
Similarities
Variations on the Word Love
Tone
- Atwood expresses to the reader an alternative meaning to how people interpret the word love.
- In the first 20 lines, the author expresses how blank and meaningless people use the word. This bitterness is evident in her description of love as “a word we use to plug/ holes with.”
- The author changes tone completely in the last 17 lines, “Then there’s the two/ of us. This word/ is far too short for us, it has only/ four letters.” Upon reading this line, it becomes evident that Atwood’s bitterness is not towards love itself, but towards the misleading image associated with it.
- Margaret Atwood shows love has become so misused that it has lost significance. Therefore, as a feeling, love is too deep and intimate to be represented by such a short word.

Diction
Rhyme Scheme
- There is no rhyme scheme (free verse/blank rhyme) in this poem as the author is trying to connect her thoughts about the word love in more personal manner.
- There are some slant/near rhymes "damp/up" and "finger/wonder"
- The author does this in order to set the reader's attention towards society's misuse of the word love
Figurative Language
- Canadian Poet
- Best known for her work as a novelist but she has also published fifteen books of poetry
- Won the Booker Prize and founder of Writer's Trust of Canada
Margaret Atwood
Third Stanza
In the third stanza, the narrator/author expresses a very floral image. The author includes words such as roses, posies, flowers, leaves of myrtle, etc. To change the image from a green-mountain-like picture into a more flowery image. These words describe how the narrator would cover his lover in roses in various ways.
Fourth Stanza
In the third stanza, the narrator/author expresses a very floral image. The author includes words such as roses, posies, flowers, leaves of myrtle, etc. To change the image from a green-mountain-like picture into a more flowery image. These words describe how the narrator would cover his lover in roses in various ways.
Fifth Stanza
In lines 17-18, the author expresses how much they are willing to feed their lover, whether it is "choral clasps" or "straw and ivy buds". The diction the author uses makes it seem like he is fruitful, rich, and is willing to share these things with their lover.
- The diction in this poem is simple and easy to read.
- Unlike the Passionate Shepherd to His Love, there is very little imagery, therefore the diction does nothing but express the author's feelings
- No hidden meanings
- Her attitude show that love has many different sides and can be viewed by many different perspectives, and furthermore, the general meaning has also been changed throughout the years.
Scansion
- The scansion in this poem is Iambic.
- The author uses this to stress the important key words in the poem.
- These important words set the tone of the author (examples: love, warm, speech)
Sixth Stanza
In the sixth stanza, the narrator expands his willingness to feed her and make her happy by developing his ideas, from the fourth and fifth stanzas, onto the sixth one. He expresses how much the narrator is ready and set to make their lover feel like a god(dess).
Seventh Stanza
In the seventh stanza, the author develops (and repeats) his first idea of the shepherd, which also relates the title of the poem. Moreover, the repitition of the shepherd is significant because it emphasizes the protagonist's character's importance, which is discussed in the theme and metaphor.
Theme
Alliteration
Imagery
Metaphors
Metaphors:
- In this poem, the theme is the variations on the word love.
- Atwood consistently mentions the difference between her view and society's view on the word love.
- She portrays this through imagery, metphors & alliteration
Although there are a few metaphors here and there, one of the most significant metaphors is the extended metaphor in the poem. The extended metaphor is the narrator/protagonist himself. Who is the narrator? A character that is giving you an invitation to eternal happiness; a character that is usually referred to as a shepherd, and his followers are referred to as his sheep; a character that can give you eternal happiness; a character that is referred to as loving.
- This is a
word we
use to plug - Verse 1
- As for the weed-seedinglings nosing
their though
- Verse 17
-
Love! Love!

sing
the
soldiers
- Verse 19
- to
fall
into, but that
fear

- The author uses imagery a numerous amount of times to allow the audience to understand that there is a significant change in people's mind about love.
- "red heart-shaped vacancies on the page that look nothing like real hearts"
- "How do we know it isn't what goes on at the cool debucheries of slugs under damp pieces of cardboard"
The theme of the poem is similar to the parable of the prodigal son, a famous story that is found in the Bible in Luke 15:11-32; this theme is "an open invitation to Love". As discussed earlier, the protagonist's character can be an extended metaphor for another character, which is Jesus. The theme is evident because of the way the protagonist is welcoming their love, through food, cleaning them up, etc. just like how the parable says: "“But the father said to his servants, ‘Quick! Bring the best robe and put it on him. Put a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet. 23 Bring the fattened calf and kill it. Let’s have a feast and celebrate. 24 For this son of mine was dead and is alive again; he was lost and is found.’ So they began to celebrate."
Personification
- " As for the weed seedlings nosing their tough snouts up amoung the lettuces, they shout it. Love! Love! Sing the soldiers raising their glittering knives in salute"
- Here the author uses personification to liven up her metaphors about the paradox she expresses within lines 13-20.
The structure of the iambic tetrameter makes the rhythm of the poem smooth and regular, for the purpose of attraction to the poem through the ears– making it sound euphonious.
So What?
The main subject is love
Both of the poems' rhythm is iambic
Both poems have slant/near rhyme
Both have alliteration to emphasize their respective themes of each poem
Both poems accentuate the importance of love
Both poems show the "get it or don't" principle about love
Both poems relate to the perspectives of the main character about love, based on events that they each experienced
LOVE YOU MISS ARHIN
- "This is a word we use to plug holes with."
- Love is just a word that will fulfill the completion of a sentence but isn't the right meaning
- "You can rub it all over your body and you can cook with it too"
- The author mentions how lotions and spices are named after love even though the name is tossed around
- "Insert it also in the one empty space on the printed form that comes with no instructions."
- Ex) Marital documents


The Poem
Come live with me and be my love,
And we will all the pleasures prove
That valleys, groves, hills, and fields,
Woods, or steepy mountain yields.

And we will sit upon rocks,
Seeing the shepherds feed their flocks,
By shallow rivers to whose falls
Melodious birds sing madrigals.

And I will make thee beds of roses
And a thousand fragrant poises,
A cap of flowers, and a kirtle
Embroidered all with leaves of myrtle;

A gown made of the finest wool
Which from our pretty lambs we pull;
Fair lined slippers for the cold,
With buckles of the purest gold;

A belt of straw and ivy buds,
With coral clasps and amber studs;
And if these pleasures may thee move,
Come live with me, and be my love.

The shepherds's swains shall dance and sing
For thy delight each May morning:
If these delights thy mind may move,
Then live with me and be my love.

The Poem
This is a word we use to plug
holes with. It's the right size for those warm
blanks in speech, for those red heart-
shaped vacancies on the page that look nothing
like real hearts. Add lace
and you can sell
it. We insert it also in the one empty
space on the printed form
that comes with no instructions. There are whole
magazines with not much in them
but the word love, you can
rub it all over your body and you
can cook with it too. How do we know
it isn't what goes on at the cool
debaucheries of slugs under damp
pieces of cardboard? As for the weed-
seedlings nosing their tough snouts up
among the lettuces, they shout it.
Love! Love! sing the soldiers, raising
their glittering knives in salute.

Then there's the two
of us. This word
is far too short for us, it has only
four letters, too sparse
to fill those deep bare
vacuums between the stars
that press on us with their deafness.
It's not love we don't wish
to fall into, but that fear.
this word is not enough but it will
have to do. It's a single
vowel in this metallic
silence, a mouth that says
O again and again in wonder
and pain, a breath, a finger
grip on a cliffside. You can
hold on or let go.
First Stanza
In the first stanza, the author uses specific words, including "love, pleasures, hills and valleys, dale and yield", sounding euphonious to emphasize those soothing words. These words stress on the imagery that the author is attempting to give away to the audience. Moreover, the author reaffirms these smooth words to try to get the audience to feel what mood the author is setting.
Second Stanza
In the second stanza, the words the author chooses are a bit cacophonous, but he only uses these words (such as rock, flocks) in the first couplet to contrast with the second couplet; the second couplet's euphony contrasts with the first's cacophony with a more soothing diction (such as shallow rivers, melodious, madrigals). Not only does the contrasting stress on the diction that the author uses, it also reaffirms the peaceful imagery the author's portraying.
Third Stanza
Same thing that occurs in the first stanza, whereas the euphonious words stress on the imagery the author is trying to portray.
Fourth & Fifth Stanza
In the fourth stanza, the author's euphonious diction becomes more apparent and blunt. Words such as "gown, wool, lambs, linèd, and gold excessively accentuate the stanza's euphony that is ruptured with the cacophony that is apparent in the first couplet in the fifth stanza (using words such as choral clasps, studs), and then abruptly moves back to his euphony in the last two couplets of the fifth stanza.
Sixth & Seventh Stanzas
The same pattern that occurs in the fourth and fifth stanzas.
Enjambment
- The author uses enjambment in most of the poem
- Atwood does this in order to be unique compared to other authors that write about love
- It also appeals to the audience because the sentence structure is irregular
Full transcript