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The First Nations

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kyla sem

on 29 January 2014

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Transcript of The First Nations

T
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We

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answering

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questions
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First we will be talking about how the groups interacted with the environment
We will discuss how their mannerisms in these regards are different and similar to us today
How did they meet their physical needs?
Then on their way of life (culture, religion, political system,food etc.)
How did they use technology?
Where did they live, discuss their homes?
What did their diet consist of, what did they eat, how did they get this food, and how did they keep it from rotting?
What were the roles of the children, the males, the women, and who did what?
How did the environmental conditions influence their interaction with the environments?
.

What were the roles of the children, the male, and the female
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Algonquins

Ojibwe
Cree
Iroquois
Huron
Haida
Blackfoot
How
The

Groups
Interact

With

The

Environment
The Algonquins tried to interact in harmony with the environment. They took what they needed and no more. When the gardens lost the nutrients they moved their villages to another location so the land could rest.
The Ojibwe were active in resource management seeking ways to live in harmony with the environment.
The Cree believed in interconnectedness of all living things and lived in harmony with nature.
The Iroquois used the environment to meet their needs. Nature supply's them with their nourishment.
The Huron have a close interaction with the natural environment, they use the environment to supply them with clothing, food, shelter etc.
The Haida people used the environment to their advantage. They used the environment for their everyday needs and welfare.
The Blackfoot people used what was around them. They used buffalo for food, tipi's and shoes.
The Algonquins lived in wigwams in the spring/summer. In winter they lived in longhouses. They hunted for moose, caribou, seal, salmon, wolves and rabbits. They used bows and arrows, spears and knives. They ate food like fish, eel, beaver and more. Some Algonquins spoke english and others spoke french. The women wore long dresses, the Algonquin men wore breechcloths and leggings. They did beadwork and basketry art. The Algonquins transported by canoeing, dogs and snowshoes.
Way
Of

Life
The Ojibwe lived in wigwams. The Ojibway hunted for animal like deer, bears, trout and rabbits. They use bows and arrows, snares and spears. They ate vegetables, wild rice, maple sugar, fish, nuts and berries. Some Ojibwe's spoke english and some spoke their native Ojibwe language. They wore long dresses and breechcloths and leggings also. They did beadwork and dream catchers. The Ojibwe transported by canoeing.
The Cree lived in wattle and haude houses. They hunted for moose, caribou, bears, bisons and beavers. They used bows and arrows, knives, clubs and spears. They ate corn, beans, squash and fish. Most Cree people spoke english and french but some of them spoke their native Cree language. They also wore long dresses, breechcloths and leggings. They did quilting crafts, woodcarving and bead work. The Cree transported by birch bark canoeing.
The Iroquois lived in long houses. They hunted for dears, bears and rabbits. They used bows and arrows, spears, fishing poles, clubs and shields. They ate corn, beans, squash, wild berries, herbs, elk and fish. There were 6 different kinds of languages the Iroquois spoke, Mohawk, Seneca, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga and Tuscarora. The Iroquois wore gustoweh. The Iroquois did mask carving, native beadwork and porcupine quill work. The Iroquois transported by canoes.
The Huron lived in longhouses. They hunted for dear, bears and wolves. They used bows and arrows, spears, fishing poles, large nets and clubs. They ate corns, beans and squash. Some Huron spoke English and the others spoke their native Huron Windat language. The Huron men wore breech cloths and leggings, the Huron women wore skirts with a poncho-style blouses.They did poetry, weaving and bead work. The Huron transported by canoeing.
The Haida lived in rectangular cedar-plank house with bark roofs. They hunted animals like deer, bear, and mountain goats in the forests and mountains. They used bows and arrows, spears, snares and clubs. They ate clams, oyster, lobster and other shell fish.Almost all Haida people speak English, but some Haidas, also speak their native Haida language.Haida men wore breech clothes. Haida people wore moccasins and heavy caribou robes during winter. Women wore knee-length skirts and poncho-like capes.Haida artists are known for their fine basketry and woodcarving art, including carved masks and spectacular totem poles. They transported by dug-out canoes.

The Blackfoots lived in wigwams. They used spears, bows and arrows, and clubs. They hunted buffalo. They also ate ground squirrel, nuts and berries. The Blackfoot's either spoke English or their native Blackfoot language, or both. The Blackfoot women wore deerskin dresses and the Balckfoot men wore buckskin tunics and breechcloths and leggings. They did quill embroidery and native beading. They transported by rafts and using dogs pulling travois.
First

Nations

Mannerisms

Different
and

Similar

To

Us

Today
Aboriginals: Speed in absorbing our knowledge. By so much more it is probable that they should desire respect. That's why they have more respect for each other then us these days.
Ojibwe:They may not interrupt an older person who is talking. This means that they have respect for whoever is speaking not like us today. Which is why they accomplish more.
Cree: In the daily Cree life behavior or/and manners were expected to be performed all the time. So this is different from us today because the Cree people would actually try to behave and show manners but in today's life kids this generation dosen't put effort.
How

Did

They

Meet

Their

Physical

Needs
?
How

Did

The

Environmental

Conditions

influence

their

interaction

with

the

environments?
How

Did

They

Use

Technology?
Where
Did

They

Live
?

Discuss
Their

Homes
What

Were

The

Roles

Of
The

Children
,

The

Male
,

And

The

Female
?
What

Did

Their

Diet

Consist

Of
?

What

Did

They
Eat
?

How
Did

They

Get

This

Food
?

How
Did
They
Keep
It
From

Rotting
?
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From the realms of the human world, the sky dwellers, the water begins, forest creatures and all other forms of life, the beautiful Mother Earth gives birth to, nutures and sustains all life.
Mother Earth provides us with our food and clean water sources. She bestows us with materials for our homes, clothes and tools.

She provides all life with raw materials for our industry, ingenuity and progress.

She is the basis of who we are as real human beings that include our languages, our cultures, our knowledge and wisdom to know how to conduct ourselves in a good way.
If we listen from the place of connection to the Spirit That Lives in All Things, Mother Earth teaches what we need to know to take care of her and all her children.
All provided by our mother, the Earth.
First Nation people have a special relationship with the earth and all living things which they needed to supply them with food, clothing, shelter ect.
When the weather change they had to rely on different things in different seasons.
The First Nations used traditional forms of technology.

For example for transportation they made snowshoes, toboggan, canoes etc.
Also water has many uses, it served as many functions, including making wood pliable.
They also transform animal hides into soft, supple leather for clothing and footwear.
The Algonquins are original natives of southern Quebec and eastern Ontario, in Canada. Today they live in nine communities in Quebec and one in Ontario. Their type of home is a wigwam.
The Ojibwe are one of the largest American Indian groups in North America. There are nearly 150 different bands of Ojibwe Indians living throughout their original home land in the northern United States and southern Canada. Some of the Ojibwe's lived in wigwarms and some were nomadic so they lived in tipi's which were easy to set up and take down.
The Cree tribe is one of the largest American Indian groups in North America. There are 200,000 Cree communities throughout Cananda and in parts of northern United States. There are also 100,000 metis people in Cananda, many metis people descend from Cree Indians and French Canadian voyageurs. They lived in wigwams and tipis if they were nomadic.
The Iroquois tribes are original residents of the northeastern woodlands area. The heart of the Iroquois homeland is located in what is now New York today. or across the border in Canada ( Ontario or Quebec ). Other Iroquois groups were forced to move west to Oklahoma or Wisconsin during the 1800s and their descendants are still living there today.
The Huron are a tribe of Native Americans who originally inhabited an area of central Ontario. The Huron were the bitter enemies of the Iroquois, and - after being driven from their lands in 1650 - split into two factions. The first group traveled to Quebec, while the other, larger band moved into the Ohio Valley region. During the 1840's these people were moved on to Kansas. Many of these people still live in the Kansas area.

The Haida are a tribe from the Northern American coast. They are believed to occupy Haida Gwaii and Southeast Alaska. The tribe has been living in the Northern coast for hundreds of years
The Blackfoot Indian tribes were originally residents of the northern Plains, particularly Montana, Idaho and Alberta in Canada. This group of native Indians owned land communally and was ruled by a council of chiefs. Most Blackfoot people still live in this region today and are organiszed in traditional clans.
In

every
tribe

these

answers

are
the
same
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the first nations had a good attitude, respect and many more which make it easier for them to learn more.

So it is similar in comparison that they still show respect and we do , but it is different that they put an effort and this generation doesn't.

Children these days don't listen to adults or show GOOD attitude.
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Algonquin women gathered plants to eat, also did most of the child care and cooking. Men were hunters and sometimes went to war to protect their families. Both genders took part in storytelling, artwork, music and traditional medicine. Children play with each other, go to school and help around the house.
Ojibwe women were farmers and also took care of the child care and cooking. Men were hunters and sometimes went to war. Both genders practiced storytelling, artwork, music, traditional medicine, and they worked together to harvest wild rice. Children would play, go to school and do chores at home.
Cree women took care of the children, built their families house, gathered plants to eat, and herbs to use for medicine. Men were hunters and fishermen, and they sometimes went to war to protect their family. Both genders took part in storytelling, artwork, music, and religious festivals. Children would play, go to school and help around the house.
Iroquois women were in charge of family, property and farming. Iroquois clans were ruled by women, who made all the land and resource decisions for each clan. Men were in charge of hunting, trading and war. Both genders took part in Iroquois storytelling, artwork and music. Children would play, go to school and do chores.
Huron women were in charge of farming, property, and family. Huron women made decisions for the clans. Women could vote who would be chief but Huron men couldn't. Men were in charge of hunting, war and diplomacy. They made political decisions for the tribe. The Huron children go to school and help around the house.
Haida women gathered plants and herbs, wove baskets and cloth, they also did all the cooking and child care. The men were fishermen. hunters and sometimes went to war to protect their family. Both genders took part in storytelling, artwork and music. The Haida children do go school and helped around the house.
Blackfoot women were in charge of the home. Besides cooking and cleaning Blackfoot women built her family's house. Blackfoot men were hunters and sometimes went to war to protect their family's. Most Blackfoot chiefs were men. Both genders took part in storytelling, artwork and music.
Algonquin: Most tribes used two or three food-gathering techniques at once to get a varied diet. Native hunting and fishing weapons varied from tribe to tribe but the most common ones were bows and arrows, spears, harpoons, fish-hooks, and blowguns.
Ojibwe: They would eat fish soup, boiled fish, fish eggs, and cook fish. To save fish, they would string them and freeze them in the snow. The Ojibwe would hunt deer, ducks, pigeons, moose, fox, wolves, bears, rabbits, beavers and other small animals. They would use bow and arrows to hunt.
Cree: The Plains Cree followed the buffalo herds in a nomadic lifestyle. For the Eastern Cree, fishing and hunting seals from canoes were more important. They would eat deer, buffalo and other bigger animals.They would string them and freeze the fish in the snow to keep it from rotting.
Iroquois: Meat was also a large part of the Iroquois diet, it provided them strength and allowed them to endure the harsh winters.They trapped wild turkey, ducks and other birds.The Iroquois were also masters at storing food without modern day technologies like refrigerators and deep freezers. Instead they built storage racks inside that hung from the rafters.
Huron:Huron men were responsible for hunting and fishing. Bear, beaver, deer, wild boar, and many types of fowl were available to the Huron.Though food was plentiful, the Huron was processed and stored much of it in preparation for long, cold winter months. Pits in the floors of the longhouses stored baskets of food. Hunting required bows and arrows, and knives. Huron men fished with spear and nets, as well as fishing poles with line and bone hooks.


Haida:Spears were used, as were hooks, lines and nets. The Haida ate cod, smelt, herring, whale, seal, sea otters, sealions and other creatures found in the sea, plus deer, elk, moose, etc.Since the natives had no way of freezing the fish, salmon was smoked by hanging it over fires. This preserved the food and prevented it from rotting.
Blackfoot:Native hunting and fishing weapons varied from tribe to tribe but the most common ones were bows and arrows, spears, harpoons, fish-hooks, and blowguns. The Blackfoot people ate buffalo, deer, moose and mountain sheep and more. Since the natives had no way of freezing the fish, salmon was smoked by hanging it over fires. This preserved the food and prevented it from rotting.
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