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Intro. to Unit 1: Academic Paragraph Development

Freewrite, Intro. to Unit 1, Identifying Academic Paragraphs and More!
by

Prof Johnson

on 14 January 2019

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Transcript of Intro. to Unit 1: Academic Paragraph Development

Introduction to Unit 1:
Academic Paragraph Development

Today's Objectives
Homework: Please turn in your annotated readings by Lamott and Ballenger. Thanks!

This Week's Focus Question: What is a (generic) academic paragraph?

Introduction to Unit 1

Activity: Recognizing Academic Paragraphs
Please go to Moodle > Today's Date > Unit 1 Academic Paragraph Development and open...
Unit 1 Writing Assignment Instructions

On your own, you can read through...
Unit 1 Rubric
Templates
Examples
What is a (generic) academic paragraph?
Introduction to Unit 1
ACADEMIC PARAGRAPH DEVELOPMENT
To explore what (generic) academic paragraphs are, let's
1) review, 2) identify the major "parts" of an academic paragraph, and 3) complete a hands-on activity.
Review
What are some of the characteristics of academic writing?

Purpose, Audience, Stance, Etc.
Four Major "Parts"
of an Academic Paragraph
1) TOPIC SENTENCE
2) SUPPORTING POINTS
3) DETAILED EVIDENCE
4) CONCLUDING SENTENCE
Activity
Freewriting Journal Prompt
Class Portal > In-Class Activity: Recognizing Academic Paragraphs

This is also "homework" (see Moodle).

Please work on this while I talk to individual students in class.
Thanks!
As part of today's homework, you were asked to read "[Poopy] First Drafts" by Anne Lamott and "The Importance of Writing Badly" by Bruce Ballenger. Choose an article to respond to.

(And yes, I just ended a sentence with a preposition. Get over it.)

What is the purpose of the article (or the main argument)? How does the author support his or her argument; what evidence does he or she provide?
Don't forget to follow the Homework Schedule to learn when your drafts are due (early, middle, final).
Full transcript