Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Colonel Fazackerley Butterworth-Toast

This is a wondrous presentation about poetry
by

banyan huyck

on 19 December 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Colonel Fazackerley Butterworth-Toast

A poem by Charles Causley Colonel Fazackerley Butterworth-Toast The poem Colonel Fazackerley Butterworth-Toast is a narrative poem, meaning it tells a story. It must have a beginning, rising action, climax, falling action, and conclusion. It is in verse, so it also rhymes. The first two lines of a verse rhyme, as do the last two. There are nine stanzas, each consisting of four lines. The author of this poem is Charles Causley. Causley wrote many poems about World War II, as he served in the royal navy at this time. He also wrote many children's poems and has received many awards for them. (!) This Poem is an excellent example of antithesis due to the opposite actions of the characters. It is a narrative poem, meaning it tells a story rather than trying to prove a point or raise awareness, although it can do these as well. Also, this poem has an interesting connotation, such as the catchy title and amusing lines. These factors all prove that the poem Colonel Fazackerly Butterworth Toast is an amusing and entertaining peice of writing. Antithesis The poem Colonel Fazackerley Butterworth-Toast is an excellent example of antithesis. Antithesis means that aspects of the story are opposite. For example, when the ghost attempts to scare Colonel Fazackerley, he is out of control, whereas Colonel Fazackerley is in control as he invites the ghost to dine (quote). In this quote, Colonel Fazackerly is shaking in laughter and the ghost is shaking in anger. One of the characters finds this whole scenario quite amusing whereas the other finds it extremely annoying. Although Colonel Fazackerly thinks that this spectre is hilarious, the ghost finds Colonel Fazackerly's behavior to be rude (quote). In this passage from the poem, Colonel Fazackerly is eating dinner and drinking wine, which only living people tend to do, and the ghost flies in through the chimney, and living people are not able to fly. Finally, Colonel Fazackerley is alive, where the ghost is dead (he's a ghost), and these two aspects are opposites. In conclusion, this poem contains antithesis because the two main characters are opposite in their actions, feelings, and states of life. Narrative The poem Colonel Fazackerly Butterworth Toast is not only a catchy and interesting poem, but it also tells a story, and this makes it a narrative poem. Narrative poems have a start, middle and end. In other words they have a plot. (!) This is the beginning to the story, it introduces the characters, the setting and the mood. The characters of the story are Colonel Fazack, and the ghost remains to be nameless. The setting is in Colonel Fazackerly's castle and the mood of the story is supernatural and comical, since Colonel Fazackerly's reaction to the ghost is comical. Many stories have a genre, and this story falls under the category of comedy. (!) This quote is an example of the plot, after occurring events that change the ghost's perspective, the ghost decides to leave the mansion. The event that took place was that Colonel Fazackerly ceased to be scared of the ghost and the ghost was unable to frighten him, in his despair and failure, the ghost left the castle. (!) Even the characters of the story are amused, or at least one of them is. Comedy is meant to make the reader feel happy and amused, when the characters of the story have this feeling it can sometimes make the reader feel the same way. In conclusion, the poem Colonel Fazackerly Butterworth Toast is an excellent example of a narrative story. Connotation The connotation of this poem is mostly what makes it amusing. The connotation is what makes the poem COLONEL FAZACKERLEY BUTTERWORTH-TOAST interesting to read. The connotation is successful because the title is amusing and catchy, what the main character says is funny, and the rhyme and rhythm of the poem is catchy. First, the title is very catchy. It attracts the audience and makes them want to read the poem. The title "Colonel Fazackerley Butterworth-Toast" is funny, which makes it catchy. Next, what the main character, Colonel Fazackerley says is amusing. (!) The way he talks and the words he uses are different from what people are used to hearing, so they find it funny. Finally, the poem has rythm and it rhymes, which makes it interesting. (!) These two aspects make the poem sound more interesting (different than normal) and they make it easier to listen to. The rhythm and rhyme make the poem have melody. This is a huge aspect in connotation. In conclusion, the title, dialect, rhythm, and rhyme are all huge aspects of the connotation of this poem, which make it interesting to read. Basically, all these aspects of the connotation make the poem interesting to listen to not only as a story, but also just as words. In Conclusion... This poem does not really have a theme, nor is it very deep. Perhaps the theme could be that there is no need to fear anything. It is more likely that this poem was simply written to entertain, not teach a lesson. Essentially, the poem Colonel Fazackerley Butterworth-Toast is an amusing and entertaining piece of writing because it is an excellent example of antithesis, it is a narrative, and because it has an interesting connotation. A wondrous presentation by
JADE SMANIA
Accompanied by...
BANYAN LEHMAN 'Oh dear, what a pity!' said Colonel Fazak.
'I don't know his name, so I can't call him back.'
And then with a smile that was hard to define,
Colonel Fazackerley went in to dine.
But Colonel Fazackerley, just as before,
Was simply delighted and called out, 'Encore!'
At which the ghost vanished, his efforts in vain,
And never was seen at the castle again. Said the Colonel, 'With laughter I'm feeling quite weak!'
(As trickles of merriment ran down his cheek).
'My house-warming party I hope you won't spurn.
You MUST say you'll come and you'll give us a turn!' The ghost in his phosphorous cloak gave a roar
And floated about between ceiling and floor.
He walked through a wall and returned through a pane
And backed up the chimney and came down again. At this, the dread ghost made a withering cry.
Said the Colonel (his monocle firm in his eye),
'Now just how you do it, I wish I could think.
Do sit down and tell me, and please have a drink.' Colonel Fazackerley put down his glass
And said, 'My dear fellow, that's really first class!
I just can't conceive how you do it at all.
I imagine you're going to a Fancy Dress Ball?' On the very first evening, while waiting to dine,
The Colonel was taking a fine sherry wine,
When the ghost, with a furious flash and a flare,
Shot out of the chimney and shivered, 'Beware!' Colonel Fazackerley Butterworth-Toast
Bought an old castle complete with a ghost,
But someone or other forgot to declare
To Colonel Fazak that the spectre was there. Said the Colonel, 'With laughter I'm feeling quite weak!'
(As trickles of merriment ran down his cheek).
'My house-warming party I hope you won't spurn.
You MUST say you'll come and you'll give us a turn!'

At this, the poor spectre - quite out of his wits -
Proceeded to shake himself almost to bits.
He rattled his chains and he clattered his bones
And he filled the whole castle with mumbles and moans. Colonel Fazackerley Butterworth-Toast
Bought an old castle complete with a ghost,
But someone or other forgot to declare
To Colonel Fazak that the spectre was there. At this, the poor spectre - quite out of his whits -
Proceeded to shake himself almost to bits.
He rattled his chains and he clattered his bones
And he filled the whole castle with mumbles and moans. "Colonel Fazackerley put down his glass
And said, 'My dear fellow, that's really first class!
I just can't conceive how you do it at all.
I imagine you're going to a Fancy Dress Ball?'" "On the very first evening, while waiting to dine,
The Colonel was taking a fine sherry wine,
When the ghost, with a furious flash and a flare,
Shot out of the chimney and shivered, 'Beware!' The ghost in his phosphorous cloak gave a roar
And floated about between ceiling and floor.
He walked through a wall and returned through a pane
And backed up the chimney and came down again. More on the Author... Charles Causley was born in 1917 and died in 2003 at the age of 86. He was famous for most of his children's poems, as well as his poems about World War II. His most famous poem is called Timothy Winters, a poem about an unfortunate boy growing up in a rough household.
But Colonel Fazackerley, just as before,
Was simply delighted and called out, 'Encore!'
At which the ghost vanished, his efforts in vain,
And never was seen at the castle again. Colonel Fazackerley Butterworth-Toast
Bought an old castle complete with a ghost
,But someone or other forgot to declare
To Colonel Fazak that the spectre was there. Said the Colonel, 'With laughter I'm feeling quite weak!'
(As trickles of merriment ran down his cheek).
'My house-warming party I hope you won't spurn.
You MUST say you'll come and you'll give us a turn!' Works Cited!!! "Monologues." N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Dec. 2012. <http://monologues.co.uk/
Childrens_Favourites/Colonel_Fazackerley.htm>.

"Poetry Archives." N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Dec. 2012. <http://www.poetryarchive.org/
poetryarchive/singlePoet.do?poetId=122>.

"Poetry Archives." N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Dec. 2012. <http://www.poetryarchive.org/
poetryarchive/singlePoem.do?poemId=124>.
Full transcript